State Archives  > Research Topics > Women's History
Women's History Resource Guide for the Pennsylvania State Archives

Caroline E. Radesky
Summer 2008

Introduction

Throughout American history, the intersectionality of gender, class, and race has constructed women’s lived experiences.  This resource guide highlights the Pennsylvania State Archives’ holdings pertaining to women’s unique experiences throughout the state’s rich history. The guide was created with the hopes of making women’s history resources readily accessible to researchers at the Pennsylvania State Archives.

Items for the guide were carefully selected from the holdings of the Archives in order to create an inclusive representation of women’s experiences throughout both Pennsylvania and United States History. Such items include government produced record groups, manuscript groups, and photographs housed at the Archives. Moreover, holdings pertaining to women or various ethnic, racial, and class backgrounds were included in order to create a more inclusive history.  However, not all items produced by or pertaining to women were included in this guide. As such, researchers may need to consult other finding aids and resource guides at the Pennsylvania State Archives in order to further their research.

The guide is organized according to record group (RG) or manuscript group (MG) number. Record groups are further arranged according to series number. As manuscript groups do not include series numbers, key items pertaining to women’s history are listed. Researchers are encouraged to consult finding aids found in the research room for further information on the holdings of manuscript groups.

Furthermore, three indexes are included with the women’s history resource guide. The first is a general index in the front of the guide. This index lists every record group, series number, and manuscript group throughout the guide. At the end of the guide, record group and manuscript group indexes are included. These indexes are organized alphabetically by subject. Subjects were chosen based on common themes found amongst the holdings. Lastly, a brief bibliography of U.S. and Pennsylvanian women’s history sources are included to help patrons further their research.

Should researchers have any further questions, please consult an archivist at the PA State Archives.

Caroline E. Radesky
August 2008

General Index to Women’s Resources at the PA State Archives
[*Also see RG and MG Subject Indexes for more information]

Record Groups

  • Record Group 1
    • Glass Lantern Slides of Pennsylvania Market Houses, 1920. {#1.9}
  • Record Group 2
    • Index to Churches and Beneficial Societies, 1831. {Series #2.16}
  • Record Group 7
    • Committee Book, 1785. {Series #7.1}
    • Minute Books, 1779-1781, 1783-1784, 1788. {Series #7.2}
    • Committee Bills, 1971-1972, 1977-1978. {Series #7.4}
    • Committee Books, 1790-1819. {Series #7.5}
    • Committee Hearing Transcripts, Testimony and Reports, 1965-1974. {Series #7.6}
    • Committee Minutes, 1945-1978. {Series #7.7}
    • Dead Bills, 1965, 1973-1976, 1979-1980.{Series #7.8}
    • History of House Bills and Resolutions, 1953, 1959, 1962-1964, 1971-1972. {Series #7.9}
    • House and Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1971-1978. {Series #7.10}
    • House File, 1790-1903. {Series #7.11}
    • Journals, 1791-1810, 1959-1962, 1969-1978. {Series #7.12}
    • Legislative Journal Papers, 1974-1978. {Series #7.13}
    • Minute Books, 1797-1798, 1813-1814, 1821-1822, 1856, 1957-1980. {Series #7.14}
    • Official Bills of the House of Representatives, 1971-1980. {Series #7.16}
    • Official Resolutions, Senate Bills and Governors' Messages, 1979-1980.{Series #7.17}
    • Record of Action on Bills in the House, 1881. {Series #7.18}
    • Records of Citations, 1969-1970, 1973-1974.) {Series #7.19}
    • Record of House and Senate Bills, Veto Bills, and Messages Remaining on the Table, 1980. {Series #7.20}
    • Committee Hearing Transcripts, Testimony and Reports, 1855, 1872, 1915, 1933, 1940-1941, 1955-1956, 1959-1961, 1963, 1965-1985. {Series #7.29}
    • Committee Books, 1810-1850, 1897-1899. Microfilm Rolls 3513-3514 for the period up to 1850. {Series #7.38}
    • House Resolutions in the Senate, 1969-1972. {Series #7.46}
    • History Ledgers of House and Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1905-1909, 1932. {Series #7.47}
    • History of Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1953, 1959, 1961-1962, 1964, 1971-1972. {Series #7.48}
    • Work Time Book for Cleaning Women, 1919-1923. {Series #7.83}
  • Record Group 10
    • Robert P. Casey Issues File, 1987-1994. {Series #10.3}
    • Proclamations, 1987-1995.{Series #10.5}
    • Bureau of Affirmative Action, Commonwealth Agency Files, 1972-1987. {Series #10.23}
    • General Subject File, 1970-1985. {Series #10.24}
    • General File, 1917-1920.{Series #10.31}
    • Scrapbooks, 1917-1920. {Series #10.36}
    • Commission History Files, 1962-1986. {Series #10.46}
    • Correspondence from Readers of Commission Reports and Publications, 1974-1978. {Series #10.47}
    • Newsletters of Women's Organizations, 1972-1985. {Series #10.48}
  • Record Group 11
    • Legal Opinions, 1920-1965. {Series #11.2}
    • Reports, 1886-1987. {Series #11.15}
    • Prenatal Care and Pregnancy Evaluation Reports, 1974-1980. {Series #11.17}
    • State HIV Planning Council Minutes, 1991-1993. {Series #11.24}
    • Migrant Health Program Patient Files, 1963-1988. {Series #11.31}
    • Quarterly Reports of Abortions Performed, 1974-1979, 1980-1985, {#11.58}
  • Record Group 13
    • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Executive Director, 1945-1988. {#13.1}
    • Reports, Correspondence, and Research File Relating to the War History Program, 1938-1947. {Series #13.48}
    • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Curators and Directors, 1965-1978. {Series #13.71}
    • Administrative Files of Directors and Assistants, 1923-1944. {Series #13.85}
    • Administrative and Public Relations File of Research Assistants, 1942-1946. {Series #13.99}
  • Record Group 15
    • General Correspondence, 1958, 1963, 1965, 1967-1974. {Series #15.2}
    • News Clipping File, 1973-1978. {Series #15.5}
    • Speech and Press Release File, 1972-1977. {Series #15.6}
    • State Prisoner Statistical Reports of Weekly Admissions and Discharges, 1953-1962.{Series #15.15}
  • Record Group 16
    • Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Labor and Industry, 1913-1916.{Series #16.1}
    • Annual Reports of the Factory Inspector, 1890, 1892-1897, 1899-1911. {Series #16.2}
    • Biennial Report of the Department of Labor and Industry, 1919-1920. {Series 16.3}
    • Reports and Related Records, 1919-1927. {Series #16.4}
    • Area Labor Market and Manpower Reports and Newsletters, 1954-1967. {Series #16.7}
    • Labor Market Area Reports, 1964-1968. {Series #16.10}
    • Motion Picture Films, Including World War Informational Films, [ca. 1941-1943]. {Series #16.14}
    • Labor Dispute Case Files, 1938-1943, 1951-1953. {Series #16.16}
    • Biannual Report of the Bureau of Rehabilitation, 1921-1922. {Series #16.17}
    • Records of the Governor's Committee on the Employment of the "Handicapped", 1954-1978. {Series #16.18}
    • Accident Prevention and Industrial Hygiene Course Book for State Factory and Building Inspectors, 1937. {Series #16.19}
    • Biennial Report of the Industrial Board, (printed), 1921-1922. {Series #16.20}
    • Departmental Bulletin Books, 1925-1930.{Series #16.21}
    • Monthly Bulletin Books, 1914-1934. {Series #16.28}
    • Monthly Reports of Work Injuries in Pennsylvania, 1972-1975.{Series #16.29}
    • Pennsylvania Labor and Industry Review Books, 1939-1945, 1947-1949. {Series #16.31}
    • Reports File, 1906-1958. {Series #16.32}
    • Selected Readings on Occupational Diseases, [ca. 1940]. {Series #16.34}
    • Special Bulletin Books, 1924-1963. {Series #16.35}
    • Legal Files, 1937-1968. {Series #16.37}
    • Minutes, 1937-1977. {Series #16.38}
    • Digest of the Transactions of the Industrial Board, 1914-1916. {#16.41}
    • Legislative Voting Records, 1911-1936. {Series #16.46}
    • Annual Reports, 1937-2005. {Series #16.47}
  • Record Group 19
    • Civil War Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1861-1866. {Series #19.11}
    • Commissions File, 1861-1929. {Series #19.14}
    • Bonus Administration Files for the Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War, 1898-1987. {Series #19.221}
  • Record Group 21
    • Commissioners of Indian Trade Accounts, 1758-1766. {Series #21.2}
    • Minutes of the Provincial Council, 1682-1775. Microfilm Rolls 570-595 {Series #21.8}
    • Miscellaneous Papers, 1664-1775. {Series #21.9}
  • Record Group 22
    • Annual Reports of Private Secondary Schools, 1971-1972. {Series #22.8}
    • Annual Reports of Public Secondary Schools, 1971-1972. {Series # 22.10}
    • Higher Education General Information Surveys on College Enrollments, 1960-1971. {Series #22.11}
    • Reports of Degrees and Other Formal Awards Conferred, 1962-1965, 1968-1972. {Series #22.14}
    • Directories and Reports of the Vocational Education Management Information System, 1970-1979. {Series #22.15}
    • Administrative Correspondence, 1972-1978.{Series #22.16}
    • Committee Studies, 1969-1976. {Series #22.17}
    • Minutes of the Board of Normal School Principals, 1920-1931.{Series #22.18}
    • Minutes of the Board of Presidents of State Teachers' Colleges, 1931-1977. {Series #22.19}
    • Minutes of the Board of State College and University Directors, 1971-1975. {Series #22.20}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees of State Colleges and the State University, 1954-1965, 1971-1977. {Series #22.21}
    • Specialized Correspondence, 1965-1977. {Series #22.22}
    • Records of Equal Rights Program Activities, 1965-1977. {Series #22.24}
    • State Board of Censors Applications for Examination, 1915-1951. {Series #22.25}
    • Daily Minutes, 1939-1956. {Series #22.26}
    • General Correspondence, 1924-1956. {Series #22.27}
    • Legal Briefs, 1915-1921, 1928-1940. {Series #22.28}
    • Reports, 1925-1951. {Series #22.29}
    • Rules, Procedures and Forms, 1915-1956. {Series #22.30}
    • Annual Reports of High Schools, 1898-1919. {Series #22.96}
    • Annual Reports of School Districts, 1897-1919. {Series #22.97}
    • Applications for Teaching Certificates, 1866-1922. {Series #22.98}
    • Correspondence of the Postwar Education Committee of the State Council of Education and the Postwar Planning Commission, 1943-1947.{Series #22.99}
    • Minute Books of the State Board of Education, 1911-1920. {Series #22.105}
    • Minutes, Correspondence, and Exhibits Relating to the Investigation of the Department of Public Instruction by the Joint Legislative Committee on Finances, 1932-1934. {Series #22.106}
    • Miscellaneous Reports, 1955-1971. {Series #22.109}
    • Records Examinations for Permanent Certificates, 1897-1919. {Series #22.113}
    • Twenty Five Year Reports of County and District Superintendents, 1900-1925. {Series #22.121}
  • Record Group 23
    • Administrative Correspondence, 1963, 1969-1970. {Series #23.1}
    • Correspondence Relating to Birth Control and Planned Parenthood, 1958-1959. {Series #23.2}
    • News Releases, 1955-1964, 1972-1974. {Series #23.4}
    • Speeches, 1955-1962. (2 folders) {Series #23.5}
    • State Institution Files, 1959-1971. {Series #23.6}
    • State Supervised Hospitals' History File, 1914-1973. {Series #23.10}
    • Alphabetical Register of Female Patients, [ca. 1886-1926] {Series #23.16}
    • Daily Report Books of Male and Female Wards, 1879-1956. {Series #23.21}
    • Female Attendants' Payroll Books, 1890-1917. {Series #23.23}
    • Female Admission Registers, 1884-1923. {Series #23.24}
    • Record Book of Female and Male Epileptics, 1887-1891. {Series #23.44}
    • Women Nurses' Payroll Book, 1917-1923. {Series #23.48}
    • Day and Night Report Books, 1936-1937. {Series #23.71}
    • Female Patients' Clothing and Property Book, 1890-1903. {Series #23.83}
    • Hydro-Therapy Reports, 1913-1923. {Series #23.91}
    • Minutes of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors, 1885-1945. {Series #23.104}
    • Record of Condition of Female Patients When Received, 1876-1904. {Series #23.119}
    • Superintendent's Reports, 1928-1932. {Series #23.126}
    • Account of Clothing Issued to Female Patients, 1851-1862. {Series #23.136}
    • Annual Reports of the Harrisburg State Hospital, 1851-1921. {Series #23.145}
    • Daily Registers, 1851-1969. {Series #23.156}
    • Electroshock Treatment Record Book, [ca. 1941-1958]. {Series #23.158}
    • Ledger of Patient Accounts, 1851-1866. {Series #23.172}
    • Medical Case Book, 1851-1867. {Series #23.177}
    • Medical Case Books of the Female Department, 1880-1922. {Series #23.178}
    • Medical Journals, 1922-1936. {Series #23.180}
    • Register of Female Patients, 1852-1884. {Series #23.198}
    • Admission Book of the Insane Department of the Pittsburgh North Side City Home, 1911-1916. {Series #23.232}
    • Admission Registers, 1925-1941. {Series #23.233}
    • Alms House Registers, 1876-1884. {Series #23.234}
    • Case Book of Allegheny City Farm, 1884-1887. {Series #23.236}
    • Case Books of Pittsburgh City Home and Hospital, 1879-1912. {Series #23.237}
    • Patient History Books, 1879-1884. {Series #23.239}
    • Register of Discharges and Deaths, 1950-1958. {Series #23.240}
    • Annual Reports of the Committee on Lunacy, 1885, 1887-1890. {Series #23.244}
    • Annual Reports of the Norristown State Hospital, 1882-1959. {Series #23.245}
    • Audio Tapes and Motion Picture Films, 1961-1962, 1968. {Series #23.248}
    • Daily Register of Admissions, Visits, Deaths and Discharged Female Patients, 1938-1940. {Series #23.253}
    • Index of 1,180 Post Mortems of the Insane, 1938-1940. {Series #23.255}
    • Death Registers of Females, 1909-1942. {Series #23.276}
    • Discharge Registers of Females, 1907-1942. {Series #23.278}
    • General Registers of Female Patients, 1895-1908, 1920-1939. {Series #23.280}
    • Patient Characteristics and Statistical Register Book, 1940-1942. {Series #23.284}
    • Admission Registers, 1900-1980. {Series #23.288}
    • Female Admission Books, 1883-1910. {Series #23.303}
    • Female Case Books, [ca. 1883-1913.] {Series #23.304}
    • Index to Female Case Books, [ca. 1883-1913]. (1 volume) {Series #23.306}
    • Public Information Motion Picture Films, 1948-1976. {Series #23.340}
    • Miscellaneous Manuals, Reports and Related Printed Materials, 1934-1967. {Series #23.344}
    • Institutional Population Records, [ca. 1882-1920]. {Series #23.345}
    • Records of Admissions, Discharges and Deaths at State Institutions, [ca. 1882-1920]. {Series #23.348}
    • Administrative File of the Secretary of Welfare, 1955-1958. {Series #23.349}
    • Reports on County Poor Relief, 1932-1939. {Series #23.353}
    • Reports, 1937-1938. (3 volumes) {Series #23.370}
    • Correspondence with Dr. Henry I. Klopp, Superintendent of the State Homeopathic Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania, 1912-1922. {Series #23.372}
    • Miscellaneous Large Photographs, undated. {Series #23.419}
  • Record Group 25
    • Minutes of the Executive Committee of the Independence Celebration Commission, [ca. 1922-1923]. {Series #25.36}
    • Minutes of the Commission's Executive and Women's Executive Committees, 1938. {Series #25.88}
  • Record Group 26
    • Bonds, Assignments, Contracts, Acts, Titles and Other Miscellaneous Documents from the Safe of Room 309, 1775-1949. {Series #26.43}
    • Federal Campaign Expense Reports for the US House of Representatives, 1972-1981. {Series #26.58}
    • General Election Statistical Files, 1960-1984. {Series #26.60}
    • Registration Figures, 1950, 1960, 1964, 1966, 1967-1972. (1 microfilm roll) roll #3826 {Series #26.81}
    • Charter Books, 1812-1875, {Series #26.108}
    • Index of Academies, Colleges and Female Seminaries, undated. {Series #26.115}
    • Records in the Secretary's Office as surveyed by the CWA Project, December 1933 to February 1934 (microfilm)
  • Record Group 27
    • Executive Correspondence and Petitions, 1775-1776 and undated. {Series #27.2}
    • Accounts, 1776-1777 and undated. {Series #27.7}
    • Executive Correspondence and Petitions, 1777-1790 & undated. {Series #27.28}
    • Executive Correspondence, 1776-1777 & undated. {Series #27.8}
    • Minute Books, 1776-1777. {Series #27.9}
    • Minute Book, 1777. {Series #27.15}
  • Record Group 28
    • "Mothers' Pension" Account Books, 1913-1917. {Series #28.62}
  • Record Group 30
    • Ku Klux Klan General Files 1923-1940. {Series #30.18}
  • Record Group 33
    • Affidavits, 1770-1806. {Series #33.4}
    • Agreements, 1783-1811, 1814 & undated. {Series #33.6}
    • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1961-1963, 1971-1984. {Series #33.7}
    • Allocatur Dockets, 1924-1954, 1971-1999. {Series #33.8}
    • Amicable Actions Papers, 1782-1809. {Series #33.9}
    • Appearance and Continuance Dockets, 1740-1795.{Series #33.11}
    • Appearance Dockets, 1795-1829, 1838-1953, 1965. {Series #33.12}
    • Appearance Papers, 1858-1879. {Series #33.13}
    • Bundles of Miscellaneous Court Papers With Index, 1790-1883. {Series #33.23}
    • Cases Stated File, 1783-1793 & undated. {Series #33.25}
    • Certiorari and Habeas Corpus Papers, 1753-1775, 1777-1787. {Series #33.26}
    • Claims Docket, 1778-1779. {Series #33.28}
    • Declarations, 1749-1802 & undated. {Series #33.34}
    • Debit Sans Breve Papers, 1802-1805, 1810-1812. {Series #33.36}
    • Depositions, 1778-1828. {Series #33.37}
    • Discontinuance Papers, 1783-1800. {Series #33.38}
    • Divorce Papers, 1786-1815.{Series #33.41}
    • Equity Dockets, 1837-1874. {Series #33.43}
    • Equity Papers, 1836-1875, 1877, 1880. {Series #33.44}
    • Escheat Papers, 1796-1822. {Series #33.45}
    • General Motion and Divorce Docket, 1750-1837 (Divorces 1800-1805 only). {Series #33.52}
    • Interrogatories, [ca. 1787-1827]. {Series #33.56}
    • Journals, 1895-1898. {Series #33.57}
    • Judgment Dockets, 1756-1896. {Series #33.58}
    • Minute Books, 1806-1816, 1819-1952. {Series #33.64}
    • Minutes, 1788, 1793, 1795-1800, 1802-1804. {Series #33.65}
    • Miscellaneous Case Papers, 1810-1813. {Series #33.66}
    • Miscellaneous Records of the Supreme Court of Nisi Prius, [ca. 1770-1800]. {Series #33.69}
    • Motions and Rules, 1789-1829. {Series #33.73}
    • Opinions, 1842-1949. {Series #33.78}
    • Perpetuation of Testimony Dockets, 1781-1801. {Series #33.84}
    • Petitions, 1781-1815.{Series #33.85}
    • Petitions,1793-1818. {Series #33.91}
    • Settlement of Accounts Case Papers, 1776-1804. {Series #33.103}
    • Verdict Papers, 1804-1812 & undated. {Series #33.114}
    • Writs of Habeas Corpus and Petitions, 1771-1863. {Series #33.118}
    • Writs of Habeas Corpus for Black Slaves and Indentured Servants, 1784-1787.{Series #33.119}
    • Writs of Inquiry, 1780-1826. {Series #33.120}
    • Court Papers, 1757-1761, 1763, 1765-1766, 1778-1782, 1786-1787. {Series #33.126}
    • General Gaol Delivery Dockets, 1778-1828. {Series #33.127}
    • Minutesand Writs of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, 1780-1808. {Series #33.128}
    • Mittimus Papers, 1783-1785, 1788, 1792-1793, 1795, 1798-1799, 1801, 1804. {Series #33.129}
    • Allocatur Dockets, 1967-1999. {Series #33.181}
    • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1961-1986. {Series #33.132}
    • Dockets, Including Lancaster and Chambersburg District Dockets, 1800-1961 {Series #33.140}
    • General Correspondence, 1810-1964. {Series #33.141}
    • Judgments Entered and Opinions Filed, 1954-1960. {Series #33.142}
    • Miscellaneous Court Records Including Histories and Rule Book, 1848-1949. {Series #33.145}
    • Opinion Papers, 1810-1965. {Series #33.151}
    • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1971-1979. {Series #33.161}
    • Allocatur Dockets, 1987-1999. {Series #33.186}
    • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1892-1980. {Series #33.168}
    • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1892-1966, 1987-1999. {Series #33.169}
    • Miscellaneous Orders-Disbarments, Suspensions, Reinstatements, Amendments to Rules, etc. 1946. {Series #33.188}
    • Miscellaneous Papers, 1799-1908. {Series #33.170}
    • Motion Dockets, 1904-1940. {Series #33.171}
  • Record Group 34
    • Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community, Subject Files the Executive Director, 1970-1983. {Series #34.11}
  • Record Group 38
    • Appeal Papers, 1895-1956. {Series #38.3}
    • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1915-1947. {Series #38.7}
    • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1921-1939. {Series #38.8}
    • Motion Docket Papers, 1916-1917. {Series #38.9}
    • Motion Dockets, 1895-1954. {Series #38.10}
    • Opinions, 1895-1937. {Series #38.11}
    • Allocatur Dockets, 1937-1948. {Series #38.16}
    • General Correspondence, 1907-1964. {Series #38.22}
    • List of Judgments and Opinions Filed, 1951-1953. {Series #38.25}
    • Minute Books, 1895-1965. {Series #38.26}
    • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1955-1986. {Series #38.27}
    • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1937-1978. {Series #38.28}
    • Motion Dockets, 1936-1940, 1956-1961. {Series #38.29}
    • Opinions, 1896-1923. {Series #38.30}
    • Minute Books, 1896-1938. {Series #38.41}
    • Opinions, 1916-1923. {Series #38.42}
    • Minute Books, 1896-1983. {Series #38.48}
    • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1899-1983. {Series #38.49}
    • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1896-1983. {Series #38.50}
  • Record Group 47
    • Married Women to Secure their Separate Earnings- Bradford County, March 19, 1873-June 13, 1891. {#47.16}
    • Tax Assessment Rolls, 1900-1960, Dauphin County. {Series #47.34}
    • Divorce, Lunatic and Drunkard Indexes. 1880-1930, Dauphin County. {Series #47.71}
    • Midwife Register, 1921-1924, Dauphin County. {#47.84}
    • Midwife Registration Receipt Book, 1921-1924, Dauphin County. {Series #47.85}
    • Birth Returns and Other Records for Negroes and Mulattos, 1785, 1788-1826, 1830. {Series #47.119}
    • Tax Assessment Books, 1822-1894, Perry County. {Series #47.194}
    • Book of Laws, 1913, Allegheny County . {Series #47.200}
    • Charters, 1838, 1855-1856, 1860-1861, 1864-1877, 1879-1883, 1887-1901, 1903-1909, 1927, 1938, 1940-1966, Lehigh County {#47.218}
    • Petitions of Married Women to get their Separate Earnings, 1875-1887, Erie County. {#47.219}
  • Record Group 57
    • Bloomsburg University Board of Trustees Minutes, 1927-1967. (microfilm rolls # 5047-5044) {Series #57.1}
    • Bloomsburg University Catalogs, 1867-1980. (Microfilm rolls # 5228-5239) {Series #57.2}
    • Bloomsburg University Faculty Government Minutes, 1970-1985. (Microfilm roll 5075) {Series #57.3}
    • Bloomsburg University Student Government Council Minutes, 1945-1982. (Microfilm roll 5072-5073) {Series #57.4}
    • Bloomsburg University Yearbooks, 1915-1987. (Microfilm roll 5209-5211) {Series #57.5}
    • California University of PA Board of Trustee Minutes, 1910-1984. (Microfilm roll 5049-5055) {Series #57.6}
    • California University of PA Yearbooks and Yearbook in Review, 1913-1917, 1919-1920, 1929. (Microfilm rolls # 5251-5265, 5418) {Series #57.7}
    • California University of PA Catalogs, 1869-1973. (Microfilm rolls # 5240-5249) {Series #57.8}
    • Cheyney University Catalogs, 1975-1987. (Microfilm roll 5378) {Series #57.9}
    • Cheyney University, The Record, 1979-1988. (Microfilm roll 5379) {Series #57.10}
    • Cheyney University Yearbooks, 1939-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 4630-4632) {Series #57.11}
    • Clarion University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1886-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5064-5078) {Series #57.12}
    • Clarion University Catalogs, 1889-1957. (Microfilm rolls # 5393-5399) {Series #57.13}
    • Clarion University College Pathfinder (Student Yearbook), 1975-1987. (Microfilm roll 5382) {Series #57.14}
    • Clarion University Faculty Forum Minutes, 1976-1988. (Microfilm roll 5056) {Series #57.15}
    • Clarion University Faculty Senate Minutes, 1960-1982, 1988. (Microfilm roll 5057-5059) {Series #57.16}
    • Clarion University Graduate Catalogs, 1969-1989. (Microfilm roll 5380) {Series #57.17}
    • Clarion University Student Senate Minutes, 1942-1988. (Microfilm roll 5060-5063) {Series #57.18}
    • Clarion University Summer Catalogs, 1958-1978. (Microfilm roll 5381) {Series #57.19}
    • Clarion University Yearbooks, 1909-1987. (Microfilm roll 5383-5391) {Series #57.20}
    • East Stroudsburg University Catalogs, 1921-1922, 1931-1932, 1939-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5280-5301) {Series #57.21}
    • East Stroudsburg University Yearbooks, 1915-1982. (Microfilm rolls # 5266-5279) {Series #57.22}
    • Edinboro University Catalogs, 1870-1871, 1896-1898, 1923-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5302-5316) {Series #57.23}
    • Indiana University of PA Scrapbooks, 1940-1975. (Microfilm rolls # 5400-5416) {Series #57.24}
    • Kutztown University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1866-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5082-5088) {Series #57.25}
    • Kutztown University Catalogs, 1866-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5317-5330) {Series #57.26}
    • Kutztown University Faculty Senate Minutes, 1964-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5089-5104) {Series #57.27}
    • Kutztown University Student Government Board Minutes, 1977-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5105-5108) {Series #57.28}
    • Kutztown University, The Key-Student Handbooks, 1936-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5348-5354) {Series #57.29}
    • Kutztown University Yearbooks, 1911-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5331-5347) {Series #57.30}
    • Lock Haven University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1914-1984. (Microfilm rolls # 5076-5080) {Series #57.31}
    • Lock Haven University Bulletins and Catalogs, 1878-1897, 1911-1970. (Microfilm rolls # 5420-5424) {Series #57.32}
    • Lock Haven University Yearbooks, 1913-1985. (Microfilm rolls # 5425-5431) {Series #57.33}
    • Mansfield University Catalogs, 1864-1865, 1893-1896, 1911-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5372-5377) {Series #57.34}
    • Mansfield University Faculty Advisory Council Minutes, 1966-1967, 1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5109) {Series #57.35}
    • Mansfield University Treasurer's Minutes, 1955-1959. (Microfilm rolls # 5081) {Series #57.36}
    • Mansfield University Yearbooks, 1918-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5357-5371) {Series #57.37}
    • Shippensburg University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1929-1982. (Microfilm rolls # 5110-5112) {Series #57.38}
    • Slippery Rock University Academic Forum Agenda/Minutes, 1966-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5118-5119) {Series #57.39}
    • Slippery Rock University Alumni News, 1945-1971. (Microfilm rolls # 5446) {Series #57.40}
    • Slippery Rock University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1968-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5113-5117) {Series #57.41}
    • Slippery Rock University Catalogs and Bulletins, 1889-1907, 1914-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5432-5439) {Series #57.42}
    • Slippery Rock University, Ginger Hill, 1956-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5447-5448) {Series #57.43}
    • Slippery Rock University Yearbooks, 1898-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5440-5445) {Series #57.44}
    • West Chester University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1869-1890, 1919-1981. (Microfilm rolls # 5120-5130) {Series #57.45}
    • West Chester University Catalogs, 1871-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5470-5486) {Series #57.46}
    • West Chester University School Newspaper, 1924-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5449-5454) {Series #57.47}
    • West Chester University Yearbooks, 1910-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5455-5469) {Series #57.48}

Manuscript Groups

  • Manuscript Group 6: Diaries and Journals Collection
  • Manuscript Group 7: Military Manuscript Collection
  • Manuscript Group 8: Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous)
  • Manuscript Group 9: Pennsylvania Writers Collection
  • Manuscript Group 43: Dock Family Papers
  • Manuscript Group 46: Ephrata Cloister Collection
  • Manuscript Group 67: Harris Family Papers
  • Manuscript Group 73: Liliane Stevens Howard Collection
  • Manuscript Group 84: McCreath Family Collection
  • Manuscript Group 90: John R. Miller Collection
  • Manuscript Group 93: Moore Family Papers
  • Manuscript Group 98: Orbison Family Papers
  • Manuscript Group 100: Pennsylvania Association of Women Deans
  • Manuscript Group 101: Pennsylvania State Temperance Union Papers
  • Manuscript Group 123: Mrs. Elisha D. Swift Papers
  • Manuscript Group 133: Welles Family Collection
  • Manuscript Group 143: Sarah R. Meseroll Collection
  • Manuscript Group 150: Henry C. Corbit Collection
  • Manuscript Group 156: Edward Martin Papers
  • Manuscript Group 171: Samuel W. Pennypacker Papers
  • Manuscript Group 184: Reading Labor Advocate Records
  • Manuscript Group 185: Harmony Society Papers
  • Manuscript Group 190: James H. Duff Papers
  • Manuscript Group 200: Poster Collection
  • Manuscript Group 201: Gertrude Howard Nauman Collection
  • Manuscript Group 208: Raymond P. Shafer Papers
  • Manuscript Group 211: Richmond Ladies Soldiers Aid Society
  • Manuscript Group 212: William E. Stewart Collection
  • Manuscript Group 213: Postcard Collection
  • Manuscript Group 214: Warren J. Harder Collection
  • Manuscript Group 215: Ethnic Studies Collection
  • Manuscript Group 216: Carlisle Indian School Collection
  • Manuscript Group 218: Photograph Collections
  • Manuscript Group 219: Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection
  • Manuscript Group 262: Special Microfilm Collections
  • Manuscript Group 264: International Utilities Political Memorabilia Collection
  • Manuscript Group 275: Misc. Manuscripts of the Revolutionary War Era
  • Manuscript Group 278: Eunice Mildred McCloskey Papers
  • Manuscript Group 283: Genevieve Blatt Papers
  • Manuscript Group 290: Valley Forge Branch of the Woman's National Farm and Garden Association
  • Manuscript Group 297: Mary Sachs Collection
  • Manuscript Group 298: Lucile Wilson Collection
  • Manuscript Group 299: Commonwealth Association of Students
  • Manuscript Group 309: Milton J. Shapp Papers
  • Manuscript Group 317: Mary Barnum Bush Hauck Collection
  • Manuscript Group 335: Violet Harner Wise Photos
  • Manuscript Group 342: George H. Earle Papers
  • Manuscript Group 350: American Association of University Women, Pennsylvania Division Records
  • Manuscript Group 351: Julious F. Sachse Deposit of Ephrata Cloister Materials
  • Manuscript Group 354: Old Economy Village Collection
  • Manuscript Group 357: Pennsylvania Women's Legislative Exchange Records
  • Manuscript Group 366: Graeme Park Collection
  • Manuscript Group 368: General Assembly Collections
  • Manuscript Group 386: Pennsylvania Federation of Women's Clubs Records
  • Manuscript Group 404: Dick Thornburgh Papers
  • Manuscript Group 406: Robert P. Casey Collection
  • Manuscript Group 409: Oral History Collection
  • Manuscript Group 420: John W. Harper Collection
  • Manuscript Group 437: Karl Arndt Collection of Harmony Society Materials
  • Manuscript Group 447: Landis Valley Farm Museum Collection
  • Manuscript Group 452: Pennsylvania Elected Women's Association Records
  • Manuscript Group 481: Records of the Pennsylvania Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs
  • Manuscript Group 494: C. DeLores Tucker Papers
  • Manuscript Group 495: Landis Family Papers

 

Pennsylvania State Archives
Women's History Resource Guide

Record Groups:

Record Group 1
Records of the Department of Agriculture

The Department of Agriculture was created in 1895 to encourage the development of agriculture, horticulture, forestry and related industries. A State Board of Agriculture, having been established in 1876 to investigate subjects relating to improvements in agriculture, continued to function alongside the Department in an advisory capacity. Legislation passed in 1919 and 1923 abolished the State Board of Agriculture, the Agricultural Commission and the Livestock Sanitary Board, thereby consolidating regulatory activities pertaining to agriculture within the Department. Functions relating to forestry had been transferred to the Department of Forestry in 1901. The Department of Agriculture is responsible for promoting the efficient marketing of farm products and for dealing with appropriate investigator and service problems. The Department acts to stem the deleterious effects of animal and plant disease as well as the spread of insect pests. In addition, the government body implements measures in order to safeguard the public against impure or misrepresented foods, fertilizers and pesticides. The State Farm Products Show Commission and the State Harness Racing Commission serve as administrative commissions within the Department of Agriculture.

  • Glass Lantern Slides of Pennsylvania Market Houses, 1920. {#1.9}
    • The file consists of lantern slides of interior and exterior views of public markets in Pennsylvania, [ca. 1920]. Slides include images of African American and white women at market.

Record Group 2
Department of the Auditor General

The Office of the Auditor General formed in 1809 in order to replace and assume many of the duties previously held by the offices of the Comptroller General and the Register General. The offices of the Comptroller General and the Register Genera had originally formed in order to liquidate claims against the state for services performed during the Revolutionary War and to assist in the final settlement of public accounts. In 1821, the Office of the Escheator General the US government dismantled the position’s prior duties relating to the estates of individuals dying intestate without heirs or kindred, then fell under the purview of the Auditor General.

By 1859, the Auditor General had gained recognition as an elective office. The Fiscal Code of 1929 transferred the function of collecting taxes from the Department of the Auditor General to the newly created Department of Revenue. Under the Code, the Department developed into a true auditing agency.

As the chief auditor of the state's fiscal affairs, the Auditor General is responsible for insuring that the Commonwealth receives all moneys to which it is entitled and that public money is spent legally and properly. The Auditor General adjusts claims against the Commonwealth, examines tax settlements made by the Revenue Department, and oversees the examination of practically every financial transaction involving the state.

  • Index to Churches and Beneficial Societies, 1831. {Series #2.16}
    • Arranged alphabetically by name of church or beneficial society. An index created in 1831 that lists the names of all the churches, seminaries, and beneficial societies then active in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. This series includes various women's societies, seminaries, and other organizations.

Record Group 7
Records of the General Assembly
Microfilmed

Legislative power is vested in a General Assembly, which consists of a House of Representatives and a Senate. The General Assembly has the authority to enact laws, appropriate funds and levy taxes. Additional powers of the legislature include the proposal of constitutional amendments, the impeachment of public officials, the maintenance of investigatory authority, and the confirmation of certain executive appointments. The first State General Assembly was a unicameral body established under the Constitution of 1776. The authors of the Constitution equipped the legislature with vast powers which enabled it to dominate the other two branches of state government. This imbalance was corrected with the adoption of subsequent constitutions, beginning with the Constitution of 1790.  The 1970 document created a bicameral assembly and a popularly elected governor. For additional materials relating to Legislative Service Agencies, see the Records of the Legislative Reference Bureau (RG-36).

  • Committee Book, 1785. {Series #7.1}
    • Committee record book for the first session of the Tenth General Assembly. Information provided is name of committee, committee number, names of those serving on the committee, and a brief description of the business assigned to the committee. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Minute Books, 1779-1781, 1783-1784, 1788. {Series #7.2}
    • Minute books of the sessions of the original unicameral General Assembly. Information provided is date of session, description of bills introduced and voted upon, motions made, names of members voting yea or nay and appointments made. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Committee Bills, 1971-1972, 1977-1978. {Series #7.4}
    • Bills submitted by committees in the House of Representatives. Includes documents and issues pertaining to women.
  • Committee Books, 1790-1819. {Series #7.5}
    • Record of petitions received and bills sent to committees. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Committee Hearing Transcripts, Testimony and Reports, 1965-1974. {Series #7.6}
    • Transcripts of hearing testimony and reports of the various committees of the House of Representatives. Information provided in the hearing transcripts is name of committee, House bill number, printer's number, place and date of hearing, names of those present, subject of bill under consideration, names of those giving testimony and transcript of the testimony taken. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Committee Minutes, 1945-1978. {Series #7.7}
    • Minute books and committee record sheets of the committees of the House of Representatives. Information provided in the minute books is date of meeting, names of the members present, names and numbers of bills considered by the committee, motions made by members of the committee, names of members making and seconding motions, names of each member voting yea or nay, and signature of the secretary of the committee. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Dead Bills, 1965, 1973-1976, 1979-1980.{Series #7.8}
    • Records of House bills that died in committee. Information provided is number of bill, title of bill, transcript of proposed bill, names of sponsors, date introduced, date sent to committee, name of person by whom introduced and their seat number, date returned to committee, and the complete text of the bill. Includes bills pertaining to women.
  • History of House Bills and Resolutions, 1953, 1959, 1962-1964, 1971-1972. {Series #7.9}
    • Published histories of bills and resolutions introduced in the House of Representatives. Information provided is House bill or resolution number, act number where applicable, printer's number, names of legislators by whom introduced, date bill or resolution was introduced, text of the bill, and date referred to committee or date approved. Includes bills pertaining to women.
  • House and Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1971-1978. {Series #7.10}
    • Original House and Senate bills and resolutions. Information generally provided is bill or resolution number, date of bill or resolution, names of sponsors, and text of the bill or resolution. Includes bills pertaining to women.
  • House File, 1790-1903. {Series #7.11}
    • Among the legislative topics addressed in the House File are petitions asking that marriages be annulled. Other records concern elementary education, immigration, regulation of the practice of medicine, regulation of the sale of butter, regulating the sale of alcoholic beverages, prohibitions relating to the Sabbath, Fugitive Slave Act, and women's issues.
  • Journals, 1791-1810, 1959-1962, 1969-1978. {Series #7.12}
    • Legislative journals of the activities of the House of Representatives commencing February 24, 1791. Information provided is date of session, numbers and titles of bills considered, a description of the business conducted and votes taken, and messages delivered by the Governor or the Secretary of the Commonwealth. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Legislative Journal Papers, 1974-1978. {Series #7.13}
    • Papers used for preparing the published Legislative Journals concerning the activities of the House of Representatives. Information provided is date of session, numbers and titles of bills considered, a description of the business conducted and votes taken, and messages delivered by the Governor or the Secretary of the Commonwealth. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Minute Books, 1797-1798, 1813-1814, 1821-1822, 1856, 1957-1980. {Series #7.14}
    • Minute books of the House of Representatives. The minute book for December 20, 1797- January 4, 1798 contains a record of petitions received and testimony taken in the investigation of contested elections in Montgomery County. The minute books dated December 17, 1813-March 28, 1814 and December 4, 1821-April 2, 1822 are records kept by the Clerk of the House of Representatives tracking the votes on legislation. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Official Bills of the House of Representatives, 1971-1980. {Series #7.16}
    • Official bills of the House of Representatives including bills returned from preceding session, tabled and miscellaneous bills, judiciary bills returned, bills vetoed by the Governor together with reasons for the veto, bills on the Speaker's desk pending action, House Resolutions and Concurrent Resolutions, Bills Vetoed by Governor and Read over the desk and laid on the Table, House and Senate Bills Pending Action, Bills Signed by the Governor, and Bills Table Automatically or by Motion. Includes bills pertaining to women.
  • Official Resolutions, Senate Bills and Governors' Messages, 1979-1980.{Series #7.17}
    • Copies of House and Senate bills and resolutions and messages from Governor Richard Thornburgh to the House of Representatives informing the House that he had signed a particular piece of legislation. Includes bills pertaining to women.
  • Record of Action on Bills in the House, 1881. {Series #7.18}
    • Record book of actions taken on bills in the House of Representatives. The type of information provided is bill number, date introduced, name of sponsor, date referred to committee, committee to which referred, date reported out of committee, number of readings, and final disposition of the bill. Includes bills pertaining to women.
  • Records of Citations, 1969-1970, 1973-1974.) {Series #7.19}
    • Records of resolutions, legislative citations, and expressions of sympathy and congratulations issued by the House of Representatives. The two volumes are a record of bills before the House providing bill number, date introduced, surname of sponsor, very brief description of subject, and date reported out of committee. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Record of House and Senate Bills, Veto Bills, and Messages Remaining on the Table, 1980. {Series #7.20}
    • House and Senate bills, veto bills, and messages remaining on the table in the House of Representatives at the end of the session. Information provided is date of bill or message, number and title of bill, and the transcript of the bill or message. Includes bills pertaining to women.
  • Committee Hearing Transcripts, Testimony and Reports, 1855, 1872, 1915, 1933, 1940-1941, 1955-1956, 1959-1961, 1963, 1965-1985. {Series #7.29}
    • Individual transcripts are generally indexed internally by names of witnesses. Typed transcripts of committee hearings and testimony. Information provided is name of committee, date of hearing, names of committee members present, index of witnesses, and verbatim transcript of the testimony given. Among the materials present are the May 5, 1936 preliminary report of the Joint Legislative Committee investigating poor relief pursuant to the House Resolution 110-1935, House Bill 322 (on employment discrimination), no-fault divorce, etc. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Committee Books, 1810-1850, 1897-1899. Microfilm Rolls 3513-3514 for the period up to 1850. {Series #7.38}
    • Register of letters and petitions received by Senate committees. Information provided is date petition or correspondence was received, committee to which referred, and a brief description of the subject of the petition or correspondence. Includes documents from and pertaining to women.
  • House Resolutions in the Senate, 1969-1972. {Series #7.46}
    • Transcripts of House resolutions introduced into the Senate. Information provided is resolution number, names of sponsors, date passed in the House, transcript of the resolution and date introduced in the Senate. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • History Ledgers of House and Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1905-1909, 1932. {Series #7.47}
    • Ledgers of House and Senate Bills and Resolutions providing a legislative history of each bill or resolution introduced. Information provided is House or Senate bill or resolution number, names of sponsors, date introduced, name of bill or resolution, date sent to committee and name of committee to which sent, date reported out of committee, dates of readings, and disposition of the bill or resolution. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • History of Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1953, 1959, 1961-1962, 1964, 1971-1972. {Series #7.48}
    • Published volumes entitled History of Senate Bills and Resolutions in the Senate that were prepared by the Secretary of the Senate and the Legislative Reference Bureau. Information provided is date of session, bill or resolution number, title of bill or resolution, names of sponsors, and a description of the actions taken. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Work Time Book for Cleaning Women, 1919-1923. {Series #7.83}
    • Monthly time book of work performed by cleaning women employed by the Senate. Information provided is name of employee, dates on which she worked, total number of days worked for the month, rate of pay per day, and amount paid for the month.

Record Group 10
Records of the Office of the Governor

The Constitution of 1790 and succeeding constitutions have placed supreme executive power in the Office of the Governor. As the chief executive officer of the Commonwealth, the Governor is responsible for directing and supervising the activities of the administrative departments, boards and commissions under his authority in order to insure the faithful execution of the laws of the Commonwealth. The Governor is the commander-in-chief of the military forces of the state, except when they are called into federal service. Legislative and judicial powers, including the remission of fines, the commutation of sentences, the granting of reprieves and pardons in conjunction with the recommendations of the Board of Pardons, and the right to veto bills of the General Assembly, are vested with the chief executive. The Governor is also responsible for submission of the state budget for consideration by the legislature. Though Senate confirmation is required for some appointments, either directly or indirectly, the Governor controls the appointment of patronage positions within most state administrative agencies. The Governor is elected for a four-year term and may serve a consecutive term.

Pennsylvania Commission for Women, 1962-1986

  • Commission History Files, 1962-1986. {Series #10.46}
    • Files documenting events sponsored by and/or associated with the Pennsylvania Commission for Women. The types of documents filed include correspondence, minutes, annual reports, newspaper clippings, memoranda, Governor's proclamations, proposals, brochures and pamphlets, training manuals, Senate Bills, photographs, fiscal information and budget reports, service purchase contracts, press releases, publications, speeches, travel vouchers, and employee evaluations. Since much of the employee information files contain Social Security numbers, consideration will be taken in by the State Archives as to whether they will be accessible to researchers. The events and organizations that the commission documented in its files include the Bicentennial Women's Center, Equal Rights Amendment, Parent Outlook Program, Women's Equality Day, and the National Women's Education Fund.
  • Correspondence from Readers of Commission Reports and Publications, 1974-1978. {Series #10.47}
    • Miscellaneous correspondence to and from the Pennsylvania Commission for Women.
  • Newsletters of Women's Organizations, 1972-1985. {Series #10.48}
    • Miscellaneous newsletters and pamphlets from feminist and women's issues groups such as the YWCA (Young Women's Christian Association), Pennsylvania Federation of Women's Clubs, League of Women Voters, and the American Association of University Women.

Governor Robert P. Casey, 1987-1995.

  • Issues File, 1987-1994. {Series #10.3}
    • Letters and accompanying documentation concerning topics of public interest received by the Governor's Office which generated a large volume of correspondence and received special handling by the staff. Due to volume, this file was maintained separately from the general correspondence file. Issues include: Abortion, AIDS, Child Abuse, Child Support, Children / Youth, Christian Heritage Week Petitions, College Funding, Cost of Living Allowance, Day Care, Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania, Domestic Violence, Drugs, Education, Education Funding, Gay Rights, Gays in the Military, Home Schooling, Homeless, State Board of Nursing, Office of Minority and Business Enterprise, Pornography, Prevailing Wage, Sex Education, Welfare Reform, WIC Program, Widow Tax, Women in the Military, Woodhaven Center, Affirmative Action, Sexual Minorities, Women's Commission, Commission on Ethnic Groups, Equal employment, Native Americans, NOW, Women and the Law, Alice Paul Day, ERA, and women representatives.
  • Proclamations, 1987-1995.{Series #10.5}
    • Official proclamations issued by the Governor concerning days, weeks and months of official celebration and observances. Examples of topics include Women’s History Month and Alice Paul Day.
  • General File, 1917-1920.{Series #10.31}
    • Miscellaneous files from the Council of National Defense & Committee of Public Safety. The files include studies and polls, lantern slides, blueprints, photographs, and county histories detailing each county's role during World War I. Includes information on the Women's Land Army.
  • Scrapbooks, 1917-1920. {Series #10.36}
    • Newspaper clippings, press releases and memoranda detailing the activities and promoting the ideas of the Council of National Defense & Committee of Public Safety. News Clippings of the War Commission (World War I), 1917-1921. Many of these may have been used as propaganda tools during World War I to entice recruitment, heighten troop morale, support farm productivity, and press the necessity for home front support. Includes information on women during the war.

Bureau of Affirmative Action

  • Commonwealth Agency Files, 1972-1987. {Series #10.23}
    • Files documenting the affirmative action plans of Commonwealth agencies. The amount of material and content of the files vary from agency to agency. Typical records that can be found in this Series include correspondence, memoranda, affirmative action plans, training programs, pamphlets, hand written notes, and job evaluation sheets. Since many of the job evaluation sheets have Social Security numbers, consideration will be taken in by the State Archives as to whether they will be accessible to the researcher.
  • General Subject File, 1970-1985. {Series #10.24}
    • Subject files dealing with issues of the Bureau of Affirmative Action. Some of the subjects covered include the Affirmative Action Work Group, Department of the Navy, March of Dimes, sexual harassment, and the Civil Service Commission, among others. The files contain memoranda, minutes, newspaper clippings, research papers, statistical studies, news releases, newsletters, and correspondence. Such items document women in the work place, sexual harassment, etc.

Record Group 11
Records of the Office of Health

The Act of April 27, 1905 (PL 312) created The Department of Health in order to replace the State Board of Health and Vital Statistics, a government  body that had been established in 1885. The Department has the authority to enforce all statutes pertaining to public health and the rules and regulations passed by Pennsylvania's Advisory Health Board. The Advisory Health Board is composed of eleven members appointed by the Governor and is charged with establishing rules and regulations for the prevention of disease, the protection of lives and health, and the provision of health services to counties and other political subdivisions. In addition to enforcing statutes and regulations pertaining to public health matters, the Department works to prevent and suppress outbreaks of disease and to ensure high quality health care at a reasonable cost.  In order to ensure its goals are met, the department coordinates a comprehensive statewide health program. As part of its responsibilities, the Department of Health operates numerous State Health Centers which serve as the primary public health service units in their communities. The Department funds bureaus and programs concerned with the control and prevention of cancer and communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS, conducts laboratory research, collects health statistics on preventative and educational programs for mothers and their children as well as drug and alcohol abusers, and regulates pharmaceutical drugs, devices, and cosmetics. Over the years, the responsibilities of specific bureaus and divisions within the Department of Health have been shifted, reorganized, or transferred to other departments. Related materials will be found in the Records of the Department of Environmental Resources (RG-43), Records of the Department of Education (RG-22) and Records of the Department of Public Welfare (RG-23).

  • Quarterly Reports of Abortions Performed, 1974-1979, 1980-1985, {#11.58}
    • Reports filed by hospitals, physicians or facilities that were approved to perform abortions under Act 209 of September 10, 1974 (The Abortion Control Act, 35 P.S. 6606). Information found in these reports is the total number of abortions performed during each quarter and the name and address of the reporting facility. Types of institutions performing abortions include health clinics, women's centers, Planned Parenthood clinics, physicians' offices, hospitals and medical centers. Other information found includes the name of the contact person regarding the data reported and statistical tables showing the number of abortions performed broken down by weeks of gestation, type of procedure, age of woman, and the woman's state and county of residence.
  • Legal Opinions, 1920-1965. {Series #11.2}
    • Records of legal cases and opinions relating to the operations at the Department of Health consisting of certificates, letters, memoranda, rules and regulations. Divided by program, each file contains a listing of major decisions or events concerning specific topics. Examples of the types of materials found in the various files include nurse wifery, labor sanitation, and maternal and child care.
  • Reports, 1886-1987. {Series #11.15}
    • Among the items found are annual and biennial reports of the State Board of Health and Vital Statistics, Department of Public Health, and the Department of Health, 1886, 1942-1944, 1950-1952, 1955-1967, 1969-1974, 1982-1983, 1984-1985; Pennsylvania Health Bulletins, 1912, 1916-1917; Rules and Regulations of the Department of Health, 1928; Organization and Functions of the Department of Health, 1938; a Manual for Public Health Nurses, 1940; State Health Plans, 1976-1987; and a study of maternal mortality in Pennsylvania, 1976.
  • Prenatal Care and Pregnancy Evaluation Reports, 1974-1980. {Series #11.17}
    • A record of a five-year federally sponsored project initiated in 1972 to study prenatal care and pregnancy. Information provided on the 21 page confidential questionnaire includes a card and interview number, the mother's name (masked) and mailing address (township, borough or city), the child's name (masked), the date of the delivery, the outcome of the delivery, the name of the hospital, the name and address of the attending physician or clinic, the date of interview, the name of the interviewer, the date the records were abstracted, and the names of the abstractor, encoder, and verifier. There are 61 questions relating to prenatal care and maternal behavior, 15 questions relating to the mother's socioeconomic background, and 32 questions concerning medical information contained in hospital or other health department records.
  • State HIV Planning Council Minutes, 1991-1993. {Series #11.24}
    • The State HIV Planning Council was created by a Federal Act in 1990 to coordinate strategy for dealing with the emergent epidemic of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) cases resulting from the spread of the Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV). Meetings dealt with issues such as the role of the Bureau of HIV/AIDS; funding for testing, research, and prevention; and the impact of immigration on the future course of the epidemic. Also addressed were problems of racial and ethnic representation, the passage of state legislation concerning HIV, budgetary concerns, and statistical profiles of HIV/AIDS cases in Pennsylvania. The HIV Planning Council was disbanded in 1996 and its responsibilities were merged into those of the Bureau of Preventive Health Programs.
  • Migrant Health Program Patient Files, 1963-1988. {Series #11.31}
    • The patient files contain a registration sheet and medical records prepared during each patient visit. Information found includes the patient's name, date of birth, home address, local or camp address, race, and date of visit. Some records contain such additional information as the patient's occupation and the names of parents, dependents, next of kin, and employer. This series includes information on women.

Record Group 13
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission

The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission was created in 1945 to consolidate the functions of the Pennsylvania Historical Commission, the State Museum and the State Archives. Charged with the responsibility of preserving the Commonwealth's historic heritage, the Commission administers the state archival and records management program and numerous museums and historical sites. The Commission also assists local historical societies and governmental agencies in all matters regarding historical preservation, conducts research and publication programs to promote Pennsylvania history, and manages the State Records Center. The Commission operates through its Bureau of Archives and History, Bureau of Museums, Bureau of Historic Sites and Properties, and Bureau of Historic Preservation.

The State Archives was originally created as the Division of Public Records in 1903 as an administrative unit in the State Library. A State Museum was also created under the State Library in accordance with legislation passed in 1905. As part of a general reorganization in 1919, the State Library became the State Library and Museum. In 1923, the State Library and Museum was made an administrative unit of the Department of Public Instruction along with the Pennsylvania Historical Commission, which had functioned as an independent commission since its establishment in 1913. Under the Department of Public Instruction, the State Library and Museum worked through five sections: the General Library, Law Library, Library Extension, Archives and History, and the State Museum.

  • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Executive Director, 1945-1988. {#13.1}
    • Governor's house, Women's Advisory Committee, 1967-1974.
  • Reports, Correspondence, and Research File Relating to the War History Program, 1938-1947. {Series #13.48}
    • Research files, budgets, organizational charts, procedures, reports, surveys, published articles, photographs, and correspondence of the War History Program directed by State Historian Sylvester K. Stevens and Assistant Historian Marvin H. Schlegel. The War History Program collected records used to document Pennsylvania's involvement in World War II. Their efforts resulted in the publication of three volumes. The research file contains a rich assortment of original records that are divided into the subcategories labeled Economic Aspects, Social Aspects, Governmental and Political Aspects, Personalities, Industrial Contributions to War Production, Newspapers, and War Casualties. The records relating to industrial contributions to the war effort contain approximately eighty photographic prints depicting women working in factories. In addition, there are raw materials such as annual reports, correspondence, photographs, and literature relating to the contributions of colleges and universities, Civil Air Patrol, teacher shortages, war production training, and Pennsylvania women's clubs.
  • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Curators and Directors, 1965-1978. {Series #13.71}
    • Administrative records, memoranda, and correspondence files of the Curators of Archaeology, Natural Science, Fine and Decorative Arts, Military History, and Science, Industry and Technology in the William Penn Memorial Museum. Subject folders for correspondence include Pennsylvania Federation of Women's Clubs and the Women's Advisory Committee.
  • Administrative Files of Directors and Assistants, 1923-1944. {Series #13.85}
    • Budget records, museum exhibit materials, photographs, and correspondence files of Director Frederic A. Godcharles (1923-1931), Director C. F. Hoban (1932-1935), Assistant Director Gertrude B. Fuller (1936-1939), Acting Assistant Director Henry W. Shoemaker (1939), and Assistant Director Mabel E. Bitner (1938-1944). The museum exhibits for the period 1932-1935 included American Indian Exhibits, Evolution of Home Heating, Pennsylvania Authors, and Pennsylvania Notable Women.
  • Administrative and Public Relations File of Research Assistants, 1942-1946. {Series #13.99}
    • Correspondence, reports, newspaper clippings and photographs relating primarily to the Commission's education programs on the theme "Pennsylvania: Keystone of Democracy" and the War History Program. The Research Assistants of the Executive Director of the Pennsylvania Historical Commission were the forerunners of the present day Public Information Office. They collected, researched, and publicized information on Pennsylvania's contribution to the war effort during World War II. Among the 280 photographs are images of women employed in war production.

Record Group 15
Records of the Department of Justice

The Department of Justice represented the government in litigation involving the Commonwealth and was responsible for providing legal advice to the Governor and all departments, boards and commissions. The head of the Department and chief law enforcement officer of the state was the Attorney General, whose appointment was first mentioned in the Constitution of 1776. Prior to 1923 the Department of Justice was known as the Attorney-General's Department. Included in the Department of Justice were the Board of Pardons, first established in 1874, and the Bureau of Correction, which was created in 1953 to administer the state correctional institutions formerly maintained by the Department of Welfare. The Attorney General became an elected officer in accordance with a constitutional amendment approved in 1978. The first elected Attorney General assumed office in 1981, and the functions of the Department of Justice were transferred to the Office of the Attorney General, and to the Governor's Office Bureau of Corrections, which later became a Department in its own right. The Commonwealth was one of the first political entities to abolish the use of corporal punishment for crime and to replace it with a system of rehabilitation through incarceration.

  • General Correspondence, 1958, 1963, 1965, 1967-1974. {Series #15.2}
    • Correspondence of the Attorney General relating to such diverse subjects as the Affirmative Action Program, Labor and Industry, Pennsylvania Program for Women and Girl Offenders, Legal Protection of Women, and Residency of Married Women for Tuition.
  • News Clipping File, 1973-1978. {Series #15.5}
    • Newspaper clippings relating to such diverse subjects as abortion, adoption, adultery, affirmative action, Child Abuse, Homosexuals, Ku Klux Klan, Racial Discrimination, and Sex Discrimination.
  • Speech and Press Release File, 1972-1977. {Series #15.6}
    • Transcripts of speeches delivered by Attorneys General J. Shane Creamer. Information is date of speech or press release and the text of the speech or release. Subjects include cases before state and federal courts, consumer protection, crime statistics, and grant announcements issued by the Department of Justice. Topics of speeches include women and the law and women's liberation.
  • State Prisoner Statistical Reports of Weekly Admissions and Discharges, 1953-1962.{Series #15.15}
    • Weekly census, population counts, admissions and discharge statistical reports. Information provided in census records include breakdowns of the prison population by race, adults and juveniles, "lifers," "barr walker cases," habitual criminals, deficient delinquents, "death house" inmates, and infants. Records include the State Correctional Institution for Women

Record Group 16
Records of Labor and Industry

The Department of Labor and Industry was created in 1913 to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth relating to the welfare and safety of industrial employees. It replaced the Department of Factory Inspection, an outgrowth of the Office of Factory Inspector, which had been established in 1889. The Department administers laws and programs relating to workmen's compensation, workmen's unemployment insurance, labor relations, mediation, minimum wages for women and minors, conditions of labor, fair employment practices and employment security.

  • Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Labor and Industry, 1913-1916.{Series #16.1}
    • Reports compiled by the Bureau of Statistics and Information in the Department of Labor and Industry for the benefit of the General Assembly. Information given includes statistical breakdowns of the number of employed persons in Pennsylvania by gender, race, citizenship status and the types of employment. Information is provided on various classes of industry and reveals each industry's capital market value, the number of days of operation, the number of male and female employees, the average daily wages paid, and the percentages of males and females, "Negroes" and foreigners employed in each industry. Accident statistics are also categorized by industry and reveal the causes and nature of the accidents reported. Other statistical charts provide breakdowns on disease rates and wage rates by industry. Narrative reports of the Industrial Board reveal the standards and codes adopted, "timely tips" issued for the benefit of employers and workers by the Department, and mediation and arbitration activities that occurred during the year. For the year 1915, there are also reports on the Workmen's Compensation Bureau and the State Workmen's Insurance Fund.
  • Annual Reports of the Factory Inspector, 1890, 1892-1897, 1899-1911. {Series #16.2}
    • Reports prepared by the Factory Inspector for the Bureau of Industrial Statistics, and after 1893 for the Governor, concerning the conditions observed at the manufacturing facilities inspected during the year. Accident reports generally give the name of the manufacturer, the location, the date of the accident, the name of the injured person and his or her place of residence, the cause of the accident, the extent of the injury, and where the victim was treated. Other statistical reports on factory inspections generally give the name of manufacturer, the type of goods manufactured, the number of male and female employees, and the number of females under the age of 12 and between the ages of 12 and 16. Also found is information concerning sanitary conditions observed, the date the inspection was conducted, and occasional explanatory notes. From 1903, the statistics on employees are also categorized by type of industry and by the inspection district and give the total number of male and female employees, of minor children aged 14-16, and of minors dismissed for lack of a certificate by reason of being underage or illiterate. Some reports also contain narrative summaries on sanitary conditions, women's and child labor and related topics.
  • Biennial Report of the Department of Labor and Industry, 1919-1920. {Series 16.3}
    • Report consists of narratives submitted by each of the Bureaus responsible for Employment, Inspection, Mediation and Arbitration, Workmen's Compensation, Industrial Board and Hygiene and Engineering. A report on the Industrial Board summarizes rulings on petitions, the approval of safety devices, industrial codes and on such labor practices as allowing minors to run motion picture machinery or work with explosives or allowing women to work on railroads or streetcars. Studies and surveys conducted by the Board include one on the "Colored" population of Pennsylvania, an industrial safety study conducted in cooperation with Bryn Mawr College, and a sketch on the wartime activities of the Industrial Board. The report from the Bureau of Workmen's Compensation provides a breakdown of funds disbursed and the report from the Bureau of Mediation and Arbitration discusses wages and capital lost as a result of the 555 labor strikes that occurred in 1920. The Bureau of Employment reported on the status of soldiers returning to work, immigrant employment, and the new Bureau of Rehabilitation that assisted disabled workers and veterans in finding employment. Moreover, the series includes information on women's and children's labor laws.
  • Legislative Voting Records, 1911-1936. {Series #16.46}
    • Information generally provided for each legislator's voting record includes the year of the legislative session, type of session (general, special, extraordinary), bill number, bill title or purpose, legislative journal page, the person's vote (yea, nay, not recorded) and often the total tally of yeas and nays. Lists and charts documenting the voting records of various legislators, primarily on labor-related topics such as workers' rights, industry regulation, pollution, taxation, the elderly and child and female laborers.
  • Reports and Related Records, 1919-1927. {Series #16.4}
    • Activity reports of the Department of Labor and Industry, and related publications and studies. The activity reports include biennial reports of the Department for 1919-1920, quadrennial reports for 1919-1923, biennial reports of the Industrial Board for 1919-1920 and an annual report of the Bureau of Workmen's Compensation, 1921. Also present is a survey of the Workmen's Compensation Board and Bureau, 1927, and a report of the Division of Industrial Hygiene and Engineering covering the period from January 1, 1922 to July 1, 1922. The publications and studies include A Compilation of Labor Laws of the Commonwealth, 1849-1921; Labor Law Administration in Pennsylvania by Robert H. Wettach, 1921; and Female and Child Labor in Pennsylvania, ca. 1920.
  • Area Labor Market and Manpower Reports and Newsletters, 1954-1967. {Series #16.7}
    • Bimonthly reports and newsletters relating to various regional labor markets in the Commonwealth. Narrative descriptions summarize changing unemployment rates, anticipated labor needs, past changes in the unemployment rate, the anticipated labor supply, and the composition and adequacy of the current unemployed labor force. Also present is information on training programs, labor turnover rates for various manufacturing firms, hours and earnings, housing and other community facilities, the effects of federal programs in aiding distressed areas, and economic redevelopment program activities. Tables give breakdowns of the number of non-agriculture wage and salary workers and the unemployed population by gender. There are also breakdowns by gender for each industry and information concerning labor turnover in various types of manufacturing industry.
  • Labor Market Area Reports, 1964-1968. {Series #16.10}
    • Reports on labor market conditions in Pennsylvania containing narrative descriptions summarizing changing unemployment rates, labor needs, the historical fluctuations in the unemployment rate, the anticipated labor supply, the composition of the current unemployed labor force, and the anticipated adequacy of the labor force. The reports also provide information on training, labor turnover rates for various manufacturing firms, statistics on hours and earnings, housing and community facilities, the effects of federal programs in aiding distressed areas, and community redevelopment activities. Tables give breakdowns of the total labor force and the number of unemployed workers by gender
  • Motion Picture Films, Including World War Informational Films, [ca. 1941-1943]. {Series #16.14}
    • Public information films (16 mm) obtained by the Bureau of Employment Security from federal government agencies. Most were made during World War II and deal with such topics as the role of women in the war effort and the use of railroads by the military. Titles include:
        • “All Out for Victory” (Job Mobilization) (16mm, 1 reel)
        • “Community at War” (War Manpower Mobilization Board) (16mm, 1 reel)
        • “Glamour Girls of 1943” (Job Mobilization) (16mm, 1 reel)
        • “Lifeline of the Nation” (Railways) (16mm, 1 reel)
        • “Railroaders Always” (Military Railroad Service) (16mm, 1 reel)
        • “Woman Power” (Job Mobilization) (16mm, 1 reel)
        • “Women of Steel” (Job Mobilization) (16mm, 1 reel)
        • “Women on the Warpath” (Willow Run, PA Job Mobilization) (16mm, 1 reel)
  • Labor Dispute Case Files, 1938-1943, 1951-1953. {Series #16.16}
    • Preliminary reports and summary final reports, memoranda, and correspondence concerning mediation of labor dispute cases. Information given generally includes the case number, the name and location of the company, the type of industry, the nature and cause of the dispute, the craft concerned, and the duration of the dispute. The final disposition reports reveal terms of the final settlement, the number of employees affected (broken down by gender), and the number of firms or employers affected by the dispute. The types of industries represented include the building trades, coal mining, the leather trades, paper manufacture, metal fabrication, clothing manufacture and the lumber industry. Women's case files are included in the series.
  • Biannual Report of the Bureau of Rehabilitation, 1921-1922. {Series #16.17}
    • Report documenting the activities of the Bureau of Rehabilitation. Information is provided on the use of federal funds for civilian rehabilitation programs and there are statistical breakdowns by age, race, literacy, schooling, gender, marital status and the number of dependents for displaced employees who were aided in finding new work by these programs.
  • Records of the Governor's Committee on the Employment of the "Handicapped", 1954-1978. {Series #16.18}
    • Minutes, correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, pamphlets, brochures, and workshop materials relating to the Governor's Committee for the Employment of the “Handicapped”. "Handicapped" women's correspondence is included in this collection.
  • Accident Prevention and Industrial Hygiene Course Book for State Factory and Building Inspectors, 1937. {Series #16.19}
    • Training course book used for a course conducted under the joint auspices of the United States Department of Labor's Division of Labor Standards, the Institute of Local and State Government, the University of Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania State College and the University of Pittsburgh. Contains test questions, narrative text, and procedures for inspecting industrial facilities. Subjects covered include basic safety inspection requirements, the fundamentals of conducting safety inspections, maintaining good housekeeping, the use of safety guards, and restricting access to areas where machinery is operating. There is also material relating to safety issues in particular "women's industries" such as laundry and textiles.
  • Biennial Report of the Industrial Board, (printed), 1921-1922. {Series #16.20}
    • Report specifying the duties and powers of the Industrial Board, summaries of meetings held, and summaries of the safety services provided. Information found includes the nature of industrial sanitation and safety standards enforced, types of head and eye protection employed, and safety precautions to be followed in laundries, tunnel construction, air compressor operation, the use of scaffolding and ladders, and the operation of locomotive boilers. There is also a list of safety appliances approved by the Board including electrical devices, motion picture devices, mechanical appliances and fire protective devices. Separate industrial codes applying specifically to women and children are given and there are abstracts of surveys on women's homework and the employment of children in theater and educational motion pictures.
  • Departmental Bulletin Books, 1925-1930.{Series #16.21}
    • Bulletins issued from the Secretary to the various bureaus of the Department of Labor and Industry. Information found includes new laws governing the agency and the functions of each bureau, regulations concerning the employment of minors, Act 466 regulating employment of women, and the definitions of the "forward," "penalty," "petition," and "administration" clauses in department regulations.
  • Digest of the Transactions of the Industrial Board, 1914-1916. {#16.41}
    • Yearly summaries of the activities of the Industrial Board. Each recap is broken down into different sections, usually topics or codes which the board was considering during that year. Issues such as administrative actions, child labor law, codes of operation, code amendments, new codes, fire prevention and women's labor law.
  • Monthly Bulletin Books, 1914-1934. {Series #16.28}
    • Public information bulletins issued monthly by the Department of Labor and Industry. Information is also found concerning a variety of safety issues, accidents reported, employment statistics, sanitation, child labor, workmen's compensation, health, industrial relations, and female labor. .
  • Monthly Reports of Work Injuries in Pennsylvania, 1972-1975.{Series #16.29}
    • Summary reports on work related injuries reported to the Bureau of Occupational Injury and Disease Compensation, the predecessor of the Bureau of Worker's Compensation. The reports highlight the causes of injuries in both manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries, the leading characteristics of such injuries, and a monthly comparison of work injuries in manufacturing and non-manufacturing industries for the preceding two years. Included are statistical tables and charts revealing gender and age distributions of injured workers, the nature of the injuries and the accidents that caused them, and the number of fatalities and long term disabilities.
  • Pennsylvania Labor and Industry Review Books, 1939-1945, 1947-1949. {Series #16.31}
    • Books containing public information pamphlets published quarterly by the Department of Labor and Industry. These reviews generally provide summaries of the functions and activities of the various boards and bureaus in the Department, rules and interpretations issued by the Industrial Board, and lists of departmental publications. Between 1941 and 1945 each review pamphlet was dedicated to a specific theme such as labor, industry, health in industry, safety, inspection, wartime transportation, plastics, textiles and women's labor.
  • Reports File, 1906-1958. {Series #16.32}
    • Reference reports and studies maintained by the library of the Department of Labor and Industry. The reports relate to such topics as accidents and safety, asbestosis, building permits and housing, unemployment rates, disabled and older workers, interstate cooperation and compacts, labor unions, industrial disputes, and women's labor.
  • Selected Readings on Occupational Diseases, [ca. 1940]. {Series #16.34}
    • Edited by J.C. Phillips, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania and technical adviser for Works Progress Administration Project #16712, these readings were designed to help define occupational diseases for the purpose of determining appropriate compensation. The readings define the scope of the problem of occupational disease, provide a classification of occupational diseases, describe experiences in specific industries, provide technical analyses of various types of occupational disease, explore the methods of dispensing occupational disease compensation, and give a legislative and administrative history of occupational diseases in America and abroad. A section is devoted to women and occupational disease and methods are given for reporting and conducting statistical analysis of such diseases to assist in achieving more timely diagnosis, prevention and control.
  • Special Bulletin Books, 1924-1963. {Series #16.35}
      • No. 3, Industrial Home Work in Pennsylvania-1923 (1 volume)
      • No. 4, Labor Laws-1924 (1 volume)
      • No. 5, Labor Laws-1925
      • No. 9, Union Wage Scale and Hours of Labor-1925
      • No. 10, Conference on Women and Children in Industry
      • No. 11, Industrial Home Work and Child Labor
      • No. 26, Philadelphia Migratory Child Workers and School Attendance (1 volume)
      • No. 27, History of Child Labor Legislation in Pennsylvania
      • No. 29, Hours and Earnings of Men and Women in the Silk Industry
  • Also include information regarding women's labor law, wage discrimination, fair wage law, child labor, industrial homework, and the 1925 Conference on Women in Industry.
  • Annual Reports, 1937-2005. {Series #16.47}
    • A nearly complete run of Labor Relations Board annual reports, dating from the inception of the Board in June 1937. The style of the reports varies over the years, although the type of information contained in them remains basically unchanged. There was a year-by-year volume numbering system utilized until its discontinuation in 1977, with subsequent reports containing either one, two, three or even four years in one single document. The studies include data on the cases which were heard during the course of the calendar year or years, both specific and cumulative, a general accounting of the overall activities for the time period in question, as well as information related to new laws enacted which had a direct impact on the Board and its work. Information on women's labor is included in this series.
  • Legal Files, 1937-1968. {Series #16.37}
    • Legal briefs, appeals, court opinions, court orders, and related court papers concerning adjudication cases brought before the Labor Relations Board that were appealed in the judicial system. The cases concern employee representation, collective bargaining, and unfair labor practices. Women's cases are included in this collection.
  • Minutes, 1937-1977. {Series #16.38}
    • Minutes of the meetings of the Labor Relations Board that was created by Act 295 of 1937 for the purpose of establishing harmonious understanding between labor and industry. The motions generally relate to cases involving representation of employees, collective bargaining, and unfair labor practices which were brought before the board by labor and management representatives under the Provisions of the Labor Relations Act.

Record Group 19
Records of Department of Military and Veterans' Affairs
Partially Microfilmed

The Department of Military and Veterans Affairs is responsible for administering the Pennsylvania National Guard, the Pennsylvania Veterans Commission, the State Armory Board, the Scotland School for Veterans Children, and veterans' homes in Erie, Hollidaysburg, Spring City (Chester County), Scranton and Pittsburgh. It also administers various assistance programs to veterans. Established in 1793 as the Adjutant General's Department and recognized as the Department of Military Affairs under the Administrative Code of 1923, the government body assumed the name of the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs in 1995. The head of the Department is the Adjutant General, whose office and duties are defined in the 1793 code. Once included in the Department, the State Athletic Commission was placed in the Department of Revenue in 1937.  The Pennsylvania Aeronautics Commission’s functions were transferred from the Department of Military Affairs to the Department of Transportation in 1970.

  • Bonus Administration Files for the Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War, 1898-1987. {Series #19.221}
    • Administrative files created in conjunction with Pennsylvania's reimbursement of funds and bonuses to veterans for honorable service in the Spanish American, World War I, World War II, Korean and Vietnam wars. Main files include: correspondence, forms, news releases, newspaper clippings, newsletters, statistics, and copies of related legislation. The bulk of the records are related specifically to the World War II bonus. Two additional topics covered are Pennsylvania's World War II Repatriation of War Dead program, and the Real Estate Tax Exemption plan for veterans. The series includes women who served in both World War II and Vietnam.
  • Civil War Muster Rolls and Related Records, 1861-1866. {Series #19.11}
    • Arranged by regiment and thereunder by company. Included in the Series are the following subseries: Alphabetical Rolls. The rolls are arranged alphabetically by the soldiers' surnames. Entries usually give the name, rank, civilian occupation, and residence; the unit, regiment, company, and commanding officer; and the date and place where the roll was taken. Particulars about sickness or injuries are also sometimes noted. Descriptive Lists of Deserters. Lists give the names, ages, places of birth, height, hair and eye color, civilian occupations, and ranks of deserters; the units, regiments, and companies to which they were assigned; and the dates and places from which they deserted. Muster-In Rolls. Entries usually list the name, age, rank, unit, regiment, and company of the soldier; the date and place where enrolled; the name of the person who mustered him in; the term of enlistment; the date of mustering in; and the name of the commanding officer. Remarks concerning promotions and assignments are sometimes recorded. Muster-Out Rolls. The dated lists ordinarily give the soldier's name, age, rank, unit, regiment and company; the date, place, and person who mustered him in; the period of enlistment; and the name of the commanding officer. Particulars concerning pay earned, promotions, capture by the enemy and the like _ regularly appear. Muster and Descriptive Rolls. Generally the rolls provide name, age, town or county and state or kingdom of birth, civilian occupation, complexion, height, eye and hair color, and rank; the unit, regiment, company and commanding officer; and the amount of money received for pay, bounties, and clothing. The muster rolls also document women who enlisted as men and were later discovered. On such individual enlisted as Charles D. Fuller (D-46). However, Fuller was "discovered to be a female," according to a notation on the muster out roll.
  • Commissions File, 1861-1929. {Series #19.14}
    • Record of the commissioned officers serving under the Adjutant General of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Entries on these copies of the commissions list the names and residences for each of the officers, the dates of the commissions, the dates from which ranks were to be held, and the brigades to which they were assigned. Included are letters regarding elections of officers, recommendations for transfers, offers to organize companies, and applications to serve in the military or in non-military support roles. Requests from women are included.

Record Group 21
Records of Proprietary Government
Microfilmed

Under the First Frame of Government drawn up by William Penn in 1682, the Provincial Council was to consist of seventy-two popularly elected members with the Governor presiding over the body and also having three votes. The Council was to govern in the absence of the Governor, appoint judges, create courts of justice, regulate trade with the Indians, and issue municipal regulations. The Council could also call and dismiss the Assembly at will and held the exclusive right to initiate legislation. The Assembly, on the other hand, possessed the right to approve or reject bills passed by the Provincial Council and to propose amendments. The Council was also to serve as the highest court of the Province.

Numerous objections were raised to the implementation of the First Frame of Government and these were addressed in the Second Frame of Government, adopted in April, 1683. Under the Second Frame, the Provincial Council consisted of three members from each county with the total membership not being allowed to exceed seventy-two or fall below eighteen. The triple vote of the Governor provided for in the First Frame was abolished but he was now given veto power. The Governor could perform no public act "except in the presence of the Council," and the Council retained control over the Assembly and legislation as stipulated in the First Frame of Government. When William Penn returned to England in 1684, he turned the government over to the Provincial Council and its president, Thomas Lloyd. William Penn subsequently grew dissatisfied with the performance of the Council and stripped it of its executive powers. In December 1686, he appointed a five-man commission. Dissatisfied once more, Penn heeded the advice of Thomas Lloyd and appointed John Blackwell Deputy Governor in July 1688. When Blackwell was removed two years later, the government returned to the hands of Provincial Council President Thomas Lloyd.  Lloyd was appointed Deputy Governor of the Province in 1691. Benjamin Fletcher replaced Lloyd in April, 1693 after Penn lost the government of the colony. During Fletcher's tenure, the Council became an appointed rather than an elected body. Once he resumed authority in 1694, William Penn appointed William Markham as his Deputy Governor.

Markham found himself at odds with both the Council and the Assembly. Consequentially, Markham acted without the Council for an entire year. When Markham finally recalled the Council in September 1696, he decided to recognize the body as appointed rather than elected. Markham needed money for defense, but the Assembly denied the Deputy Governor.  Markham eventually granted greater powers to the Assembly in exchange for their cooperation in what came to be known as "Markham's Frame of Government." This frame took away some of the Council's powers, giving both the Council and Assembly the right to propose legislation. Both houses needed to consent in order for legislation to pass. Although the Governor in Council could still call the Assembly at any time, the right of adjournment passed to the Assembly.

On October 28, 1701 William Penn's new Charter of Privileges was adopted. It remained until the overthrow of the proprietary government in 1776. The Charter of Privileges contained no reference to the Council as a legislative body and, therefore, the Council was excluded by implication from the legislative process. Membership was appointive and tenure was at the Proprietor's pleasure. Consequently, the best known and most conservative inhabitants of the Province and of devoted friends of the Proprietor comprised the Council. In the Governor's absence, the Council could exercise all of his powers except those relating to legislation. Advice and consent of the Council was still necessary for the Governor to act on matters of government, but this restriction was no longer in force after 1763.

All of the Provincial Council records in the custody of the State Archives were microfilmed under the sponsorship of the National Historical Publications Commission and may be located by consulting the Guide to the Microfilm of the Records of the Provincial Council, 1682-1776, in the Pennsylvania State Archives by Donald H. Kent and Martha L. Simonetti (Harrisburg: 1966). Index information cards for each document that were filmed at the time give the title and description of the item, the endorsement of the Council, if any, and the place or places where the record has been published. For related types of materials on the Provincial Council see also the Logan Papers (Manuscript Group 379), Richard Peters Papers (Manuscript Group 498), Shippen Family Papers (Manuscript Group 595), Penn Manuscripts (Manuscript Group 485), Miscellaneous Collection (Manuscript 425), and Provincial Council Papers (Manuscript Group 1040) at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania located at 1300 Locust Street in Philadelphia. Rough minutes of the Provincial Council for the period May 15, 1693 to August 13, 1717 will be found in the collections of the American Philosophical Society and these were microfilmed as part of the Library of Congress and the University of North Carolina joint State Microfilm Records Project that was completed in 1950. Israel D. Rupp, writing under the pen name of "A Gentleman of the Bar," published a book entitled Early History of Western Pennsylvania in 1849 that contains an appendix relating to Indian affairs in the Provincial period. This appendix contains transcripts of instructions of the Governor and Council to the delegates attending Indian conferences, journals containing minutes of conferences, messages from the Governor and Council to the Indians, and peace treaties.

  • Commissioners of Indian Trade Accounts, 1758-1766. {Series #21.2}
    • Grouped by fort or town and arranged thereunder chronologically by date of entry. Indian trade accounts kept by Treasurer John Reynolds for the Commissioners of Indian Trade. Information provided in the cash summary tables is date of entry, location of trade, and amount. Information provided on individual trader accounts is date of entry, name of trader or merchant, amount on interest, and amount to Province of Pennsylvania. Trader and merchant names include Mary Coates, Margaret Coates, Mildred Roberts, Joseph Richardson, William Fisher, Rachel Pemberton, Mary Sorrell. Mary Taggart, Beulah Paschal, Elizabeth Paschal, Sarah Hasell, Thomasina Hasell, Hannah Growden, Margarett Hyatt, Ann Ohill, Mary Richardson, Elizabeth Griffitts, Elizabeth Warner, Anna Warner, Hannah Allen, Barbara Gheer, Mildred Roberts,
  • Minutes of the Provincial Council, 1682-1775. Microfilm Rolls 570-595 {Series #21.8}
    • Minutes of the proceedings of the Provincial Council of Pennsylvania covering the period from March 10, 1682/3 to December 9, 1775. It is believed that the earliest records and minutes of the Provincial Council were kept on loose sheets of paper and only later recorded in books as evidenced by the frequent long intervals of dates and blank spaces left for documents. The published minutes are indexed externally, alphabetically by name and subject in General Index to the Colonial Records of Pennsylvania in 16 Volumes and the Pennsylvania Archives in 12 Volumes prepared and arranged by Samuel Hazard (Philadelphia: 1860). In the forth volume of the collection, Native American men are described as "women". This illustrates the influence of Anglo American gender roles amongst the American Indians of the period.
  • Miscellaneous Papers, 1664-1775. {Series #21.9}
    • Miscellaneous correspondence, agreements, proclamations, land grants, deeds, receipts, memoranda, depositions, assignments, warrants, surveys, returns of survey, patents, wills, minutes, ledgers, lists and reports. Information provided varies with type of document. Subjects touched upon include the agreement between the English and the Dutch at New York in 1664, Quit Rent Act of 1705/6, the Pennsylvania-Maryland boundary dispute, the Militia Bill, Indian treaties, the French and Indian War, and Connecticut claims. Includes cases and testimonies of women.

Record Group 22
Records of the Department of Education
Partially Microfilmed

The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction was established under the Constitution of 1874. It replaced the Office of Superintendent of Common Schools, which had been created in 1857 to assume the duties relating to the administration of public schools originally lodged with the Secretary of the Commonwealth by the Free School Act of 1834. By 1876, the officials working under the Superintendent were commonly known as the Department of Public Instruction. The powers and duties of this Department _greatly increased in 1923 when the State Library and Museum, the State Board of Censors, the Public School Employees' Retirement Board, the Pennsylvania Historical Commission, and the various State professional examining boards were made administrative units of Public Instruction.

In keeping with its responsibility for the administration the State's educational policies, the Department of Public Instruction supervised the public school system, distributed State subsidies to school districts, administered teachers' colleges and vocational-education programs, issued licenses for certain professions, and operated the State Library. Several administrative units were eventually separated from the Department. In 1945, the Historical Commission, the Museum and the State Archives were merged to form an independent agency, the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The State Board of Censors was abolished in 1956 once the act creating it was declared unconstitutional by the State Supreme Court. In 1963, the professional examining boards transferred to the jurisdiction of the Department of State. In 1969, the name of the Department of Public Instruction changed to the Department of Education.

  • Annual Reports of Private Secondary Schools, 1971-1972. {Series #22.8}
    • Annual reports relating to pupils, subjects, general data, and enrollment for private secondary schools, filed with the Department of Education for the period 1971-1972. Information furnished includes name of the school, county, address, signature of administrator and date, date received by the Bureau of Statistics, number of days in the school year, length of school day in hours, number of class periods in average school day, length of average class period in minutes, number of teachers, enrollment by subject and grade, distribution of twelfth-grade graduates by age, number of graduates who applied for admission to a degree granting institution by gender, and a chart showing distribution of total graduates by post-high school activity.
  • Annual Reports of Public Secondary Schools, 1971-1972. {Series # 22.10}
    • Information furnished for each school includes name of the administrative unit, county, name of school or intermediate unit, address, name and signature of principal with telephone number, signature of administrator and date, date received by the Division of Statistics, opening and closing date of school year for teachers and pupils, number of days in school, length of school day in hours, number of class periods in average school day, length of average class period in minutes, number of graduates who applied for admission to a degree granting institution by gender, and a chart showing distribution of total graduates by post-high school activity. Categories for post-high school activities include various types of post-secondary institutions and programs, as well as types of occupations, all broken down by race and sex.
  • Higher Education General Information Surveys on College Enrollments, 1960-1971. {Series #22.11}
    • Information furnished by each institution includes name of the institution, signature of administrator and date, and date received by the Bureau of Statistics. Reports filed from 1960 to 1968 include full-time and part-time enrollments, and freshmen full-time student enrollments broken down by gender. Reports filed from 1969 to 1971 include full-time and part-time enrollments and credit hours registered, broken down by gender for undergraduates, graduate students, non-degree students, and first-time freshmen.
  • Reports of Degrees and Other Formal Awards Conferred, 1962-1965, 1968-1972. {Series #22.14}
    • Annual reports submitted by each institution of higher education relating to degrees, certificates, and diplomas conferred. The reports for 1962 to 1965 are broken down into two categories: Associate's Degrees, Certificates and Diplomas, and Bachelor's and Higher Degrees. Information furnished includes name and location of the institution, name of administrator and date, and date received by the Bureau of Statistics, and type and number of degrees conferred, by gender, for each program. The reports for 1968 to 1972 are broken down by type of institution. Information furnished includes name and location of the institution, name of administrator and date, and reporting date, type and number of degrees conferred, by gender, for each field of study.
  • Directories and Reports of the Vocational Education Management Information System, 1970-1979. {Series #22.15}
    • Reference directories to secondary and post-secondary schools in Pennsylvania that offered Vocational Education programs and reports providing analysis of such programs. The directories specify the types of programs offered, course offerings, total enrollment, and enrollment by grade level at each school, by region, county, and school district. The reports provide a descriptive analysis of Vocational Education programs by providing data that includes total enrollment, enrollment broken down by race, gender and grade, course offerings, program duration, and cooperative opportunities.
  • Administrative Correspondence, 1972-1978.{Series #22.16}
    • Correspondence of the Commissioner of Higher Education who headed the Office of Higher Education. File headings include correspondence to presidents of state colleges and universities, 1972-77; Gladys S. Hardy, 1976-1977; Lincoln University Special File, 1977-1978; Edward C. McGuire, 1977; Violet R. Smith, 1977; hearing transcripts re: Violet R. Smith, 1977; trust fund, 1974-1977; and Harold C. Wisor, 1977.
  • Committee Studies, 1969-1976. {Series #22.17}
    • Series contains minutes, studies, reports, and conference records of special committees within the Office of Commissioner of Higher Education. Subjects include campus unrest; coordinators of Higher Education Eastern Seaboard Enclave; classification and compensation study; degree programs; employee performance and development guide; Master Plan For Higher Education; institutional master plan; and Task Force on Two-year Post-Secondary Education in Pennsylvania. This series includes information on early women in higher education.
  • Minutes of the Board of Normal School Principals, 1920-1931.{Series #22.18}
    • A record of meetings of the Board of Normal School Principals. A typical agenda includes the date, time and location of the meeting and a list of those members attending the meeting. Topics discussed include admission requirements, committee appointments, committee reports; course of study, curricula, finances, length of school year, redistricting, summer school sessions, and school vacation dates. As normal schools had high female attendance rates, this collection includes information on women in higher education.
  • Minutes of the Board of Presidents of State Teachers' Colleges, 1931-1977. {Series #22.19}
    • A record of meetings of the Board of Presidents of State Teachers Colleges. A typical agenda includes the date, time and location of the meeting and a list of those members attending the meeting. Topics discussed include athletics, committee appointments, budget, committee reports, curriculum, enrollment, faculty, fees, finances, salaries, school year calendar, and standards. Includes information on women in higher education.
  • Minutes of the Board of State College and University Directors, 1971-1975. {Series #22.20}
    • A record of meetings of the Board of State College and University Directors. A typical agenda includes the date, time and location of the meeting and a list of those members attending the meeting. Topics discussed include budgets, capitol projects, committee appointments, committee reports, faculty, fees, legislation, programs, purchasing, residency requirements, salaries. Includes information on women in higher education.
  • Minutes of the Board of Trustees of State Colleges and the State University, 1954-1965, 1971-1977. {Series #22.21}
    • A record of meetings of the Board of Trustees of State Colleges and Universities. Information provided from agenda formats varies for each of the thirteen state owned schools. A typical agenda includes the call to order that gives the date, time and campus location of the meeting. Also frequently listed are the name of the members and guests invited to attend the meeting. Reports discussed include the President's report on the budget, and those submitted by the Athletic Committee, Budget and Finance Committee, Institutional Development Committee, Personnel Committee and the Public Relations Committee. Common topics include faculty appointments, retirement, accreditation, building development, gifts, grants, tuition fees, and student assistance. Includes information on women in higher education.
  • Specialized Correspondence, 1965-1977. {Series #22.22}
    • Specialized correspondence of the Commissioner of Higher Education. Topics include Baskin's private dorms, Bridgewater Case (Clarion State College), California State College student problems, Commonwealth university system, faculty development, Fund for Improvement of Post-Secondary Education, Indiana University presidential search, Millersville conference originals, moratorium on branch campuses, off-campus centers study (Heald-Hobson), Open College Study, Penn-Jersey common market, Prison education, Servicemen's Opportunity College, Speeches, State College Missions, Tenure, West Chester presidential search, and Westchester State College censure. Includes information on affirmative action and women's education.
  • Annual Reports of High Schools, 1898-1919. {Series #22.96}
    • Annual reports filed by high schools with the Department of Public Instruction. Information contained in the reports includes the number of months in the year that the school was open, the number of who were pupils enrolled broken down by gender, the number of students who graduated, the number of teachers employed, and the number of pupils studying each subject.|
  • Annual Reports of School Districts, 1897-1919. {Series #22.97}
    • Annual reports filed by each school district with the Superintendent of Public Instruction. Information given includes the number of schools in the district, the number of years in the course of study; the number of scholars, the district tax rate, treasurer's receipts, the number of months in the year the school was open, the number of pupils enrolled by gender, the number of students graduating, the number of teachers employed, and the number of pupils studying each subject.
  • Applications for Teaching Certificates, 1866-1922. {Series #22.98}
    • Applications for permanent, provisional, temporary, special, and temporary special continuation teaching certificates submitted to the Superintendent of Public Instruction. The type of information given varies with the forms utilized. Application forms for provisional college certification provide the name, age, address, county of residence, and college of the candidate; the college courses that he or she studied; the date that the diploma was issued; and the dates that the application was received and the certificate granted. Application forms for permanent certification, on the other hand, usually only indicate the name, address, semesters of teaching experience, and school district of the applicant; the date that the application was received; and the date that certification was granted. As teaching was one of the few professions open to women, this collection includes information on women in higher education.
  • Correspondence of the Postwar Education Committee of the State Council of Education and the Postwar Planning Commission, 1943-1947.{Series #22.99}
    • This Series contains correspondence, memoranda, reports, and plans and procedures that outline the organization, responsibilities, activities and goals of the Postwar Planning Commission and the Postwar Education Committee. Topics addressed by the documents include funding, literacy, vocational training, education, memorials, counseling, employment, school facilities, and readjustment of veterans and civilians to a peacetime economy. Includes information on women and education.
  • Minute Books of the State Board of Education, 1911-1920. {Series #22.105}
    • Minutes documenting the meetings of the State Board of Education. A typical record includes the date, time and location of the meeting, a list of the names of those members attending the meeting, and a summary of the discussion. Topics discussed include admission requirements, committee appointments, curricula, appropriations, expenses, investigations, lighted school rooms, graduation requirements, conditions of school buildings, legislation, physical education, vocational education, and federal education reports and plans. Includes information on women and education.
  • Minutes, Correspondence, and Exhibits Relating to the Investigation of the Department of Public Instruction by the Joint Legislative Committee on Finances, 1932-1934. {Series #22.106}
    • Minutes, correspondence, and exhibits relating to the investigation of the Department of Public Instruction by the Joint Legislative Committee on Finances. Areas investigated by the committee include the nature of the departmental organization, the functions performed, and staff salaries; teacher salaries; teacher preparation colleges; the overabundance of students being trained to be teachers; costs of maintaining school buildings; and school funding. Exhibits include summaries of duties of the department and the bureaus, financial information, organizational charts, employee and salary rosters, reorganization proposals, reports, publications, purchasing procedures, teacher placement and education summaries, curricula, enrollment, and graduation and tuition information on colleges and universities. Suggestions to improve education and reduce spending discussed by the committee and the department included cutting personnel, closing colleges dedicated to training teachers, cutting salaries, reorganizing the Department, and reorganizing public schools. Includes information on women and education.
  • Miscellaneous Reports, 1955-1971. {Series #22.109}
    • This Series is comprised of reports filed with the Superintendent of Public Instruction relevant to elementary, secondary and higher education in Pennsylvania. Topics covered by the reports include curricula, state colleges and universities, special education, vocational education, the Master Plan of Higher Education, library standards, and Project Upward Bound. Includes information on women and education.
  • Records Examinations for Permanent Certificates, 1897-1919. {Series #22.113}
    • This Series contains the record of the examination results of applicants for teaching certificates filed with the Department of Public Instruction. Information contained on the forms includes the names of the members of the examining committee including the chairman and secretary; the number of applicants; the number of applications approved; the names, and sometimes, the address of the applicants; the number of terms each applicant taught; each applicant's examination score as well as their percentage marks in each of several subjects including spelling, reading, writing, arithmetic, history, government, hygiene, algebra, geography, and pedagogy; and finally, either the number of the certificate issued or the date the certificate was issued to each successful applicant. As teaching was one of the few professions open to women, this collection includes information on women in higher education.
  • Twenty Five Year Reports of County and District Superintendents, 1900-1925. {Series #22.121}
    • Reports submitted by the county or district superintendent at the request of the Department of Public Instruction to correlate with similar reports that had been completed in 1877 and 1900. The purpose of the reports was to call attention to noteworthy achievements, specific epochs of change and progress, important dates, outstanding personages, and other information showing what had been accomplished and the nature of future needs. Information discussed in the reports includes enrollment and teacher statistics, the status of school facilities and equipment, district organization, growth of high school (secondary) education, teacher training, curriculum development, and funding for education. Some of the reports also include information on parochial schools, academies and colleges. Includes information on women in higher education.
  • Records of Equal Rights Program Activities, 1965-1977. {Series #22.24}
    • Program activities of the Office of Equal Education Opportunity. Files include memoranda, correspondence, testimonies, reports, agenda, news clippings, grant applications, press releases, minutes, service purchase contracts, general invoices, programs, and registration forms. Subjects in the files include Afro-American Mandate, 1968; Allenberry seminars and conferences, 1966-1970; Ethnic Heritage, 1975-1976; Higher Education Conference program and report, 1965-1966; Human Relations Committee-PDE, 1970-1972; Intergroup Curriculum Projects, 1974-1975; Key Clubs, 1974-1977; PDE Advisory Committee, 1975; Philadelphia Fellowship Commission College Conference, 1966-1968; Recruitment Clinics, 1972-1973; Rhodes - Legislation, 1974-1975; Sexism - Bureau reports, 1973; Sexism - Implementation and Evaluation Committee, 1971-1976; State Board Report re: School Desegregation, 1975; and Vocational Education Segregation, 1976.

State Board of Censors (Motion Picture)
Created in 1915, the Board of Censors was composed of three members appointed by the Governor in order to examine and supervise the examination by others of all films, reels or views exhibited or used in Pennsylvania to ensure compliance with proper moral standards. The Board was specifically charged with preventing the display of any such motion picture film judged to be sacrilegious, obscene, indecent, or immoral or such as might tend, in the judgment of the Board, to debase or corrupt community morals. The Board was abolished in 1956.

  • Applications for Examination, 1915-1951. {Series #22.25}
    • This Series contains the applications submitted by motion picture film companies requesting the Board of Censors to review their films. The application gives the title of the film; the name of the manufacturer; the names of the leading actors and actresses; the number and length of reels; the style of film and indicates whether the film was approved without changes, approved with eliminations, or condemned outright. If the film was approved with eliminations, an Eliminations Form is attached and lists the specific changes that needed to be made. There is often also present a Memorandum of Changes form that reveals when requested eliminations or changes were made and when the Board approved the film. Some applications have copies of the script attached. This series illustrates notions of gender and sexuality present within the period.
  • Daily Minutes, 1939-1956. {Series #22.26}
    • Minutes documenting the daily activities of the Board of Censors reviewers. Information contained in the minutes provides the name and manufacturer of the motion picture films reviewed, whether they were approved without change, approved with eliminations, or condemned. If the film was approved with changes or condemned the reason and required revisions were listed. The minutes also list contacts with film manufacturers who appealed the review of films by the Board of Censors. This series illustrates notions of gender and sexuality present within the period.
  • General Correspondence, 1924-1956. {Series #22.27}
    • Correspondence received and sent by the Board of Censors chairman and members. Also included are a few legal briefs, press releases and movie reviews. The correspondence were received by or sent to Abraham Levy, Special Deputy Attorney General, citizens, clergy, motion picture companies, officials from Pennsylvania state government agencies, and officials from agencies in other states such as Ohio, New York and Maryland. Subjects include censorship; news clippings; clergyman and women's clubs; television censorship; condemned motion pictures; complaints; and soviet films. Correspondence discuss the review of motion picture films by the board, revisions to make the movie appropriate for release, denial for release of the film, opinions from agency officials and other states regarding the film' s content. Films include "The Birth of a Baby," "She Shoulda Said No," etc...
  • Legal Briefs, 1915-1921, 1928-1940. {Series #22.28}
    • This Series contains appeals, replies, briefs, orders and correspondence filed by motion picture companies, the State Board of Censors, the attorney general and the court in matters regarding the denial of the release of a film by the Board of Censors. This series illustrates notions of gender and sexuality present within the period.
  • Reports, 1925-1951. {Series #22.29}
    • Annual reports submitted by the Board concerning prosecutions of violations; the sale of substituted approval seals; budget allotments; the number of movies and reels examined; the number of films certified, modified, with number of eliminations, or disapproved; list of appeals taken to court; and number of field inspections. This series illustrates notions of gender and sexuality present within the period.
  • Rules, Procedures and Forms, 1915-1956. {Series #22.30}
    • This Series contains a wide variety of documents providing insight into the Board's operating procedures. Among the materials present are Fines, 1919-1947, that list the fines assessed to movie theaters for showing films that were not edited to meet the Board's requirements or did not show the Board's seal of approval and Certificates of Censorship, 1915-1951, that are the official forms sent to the manufacturer to indicate if a film has been approved, approved with eliminations, or not approved. Information included is the film's title, name of manufacturer, number of reels and date certificate was issued; Action on "Soundies", no date, list of films with sound that were reviewed by the Board and includes the film's title, leading actor and actress, and what action was taken; Record of Violations, 1939-1949, lists fines issued to each manufacturer giving the film's title, location where shown, date of the incident, and violation; Rule and Regulations, 1915-1950, contains copies of acts, rules, mission statements, legal briefs and correspondence used to direct the Board; Procedures and Forms, 1915-1956, contains copies of forms, sample letters, certificates, affidavits, violation notices, monthly reports and procedures; Inspector's Report on Eliminations, 1915-1951, contains the report submitted by the inspector after reviewing a film including the film's title, manufacturer, and requested eliminations; Violations of Censorship, 1927-1929, contains reports, correspondence and affidavits reporting violations and requests regarding the violation. Information includes the film's title, the name of the manufacturer, and the date and location of the incident and the violation. This series illustrates notions of gender, fertility, and sexuality present within the period.

Record Group 23
Records of the Department of Public Welfare

The Departments of Public Assistance and Welfare merged in 1958 to form the Department of Public Welfare. As the primary state agency concerned with the social welfare and financial needs of the citizens of the Commonwealth, the Department of Public Welfare administers a wide range of services which include: public assistance, medical assistance, aid to the handicapped, mental health and retardation programs and institutions, State hospitals, and the licensing and inspection of nursing homes, day-care centers and hospitals.

The department can be traced directly back to the Board of Public Charities, which was created in 1869 to inspect all charitable and correctional institutions in the Commonwealth, and the Board's Committee on Lunacy, which was established in 1883 to examine places for the confinement of the insane. In 1921, the Board of Public Charities and the Committee on Lunacy were abolished, and the Department of Public Welfare was created to coordinate and administer welfare programs. In 1923, the name of the Department of Public Welfare was changed to the Department of Welfare. Supervision over penal and correctional institutions was transferred in 1953 from the Bureau of Penal Affairs to the Department of Justice.

In 1937, the Department of Public Assistance was created to administer a centralized relief program. The State Emergency Relief Board, established in 1932 to handle unemployment relief and work relief, was abolished and its powers and duties, along with those of the Welfare Department's Bureau of Assistance, were transferred to the new agency.

  • Administrative Correspondence, 1963, 1969-1970. {Series #23.1}
    • Correspondence of the Secretary of Public Welfare relating to such varied topics as chiropractic care, alcoholism, the chaplain program for state institutions, juvenile delinquency, housing, foster grandparent programs, family planning, model cities, out-of-state travel requests, organizational charts, daycare, Opportunities Industrialization Centers, and women's issues. The search room finding aid lists the titles on each folder.
  • Correspondence Relating to Birth Control and Planned Parenthood, 1958-1959. {Series #23.2}
    • On December 16, 1958, the State Board of Public Assistance issued a directive granting welfare case workers the discretion to refer clients to birth control clinics. The language of the directive was: "In those instances where a case worker has reason to believe, or has been informed by a client, that there is a need for maternal health advice or therapy, and where there are not religious restrictions on the part of either the worker or the client, proper referrals may be made to either the client's doctor or maternal health center. Where a case worker, because of religious convictions may not make such a recommendation, the case worker's supervisor shall see that information relative to such service shall be conveyed to the family concerned." On January 27, 1959, the Board deferred enacting the Directive. The Series consists of letters from constituents (clergy, nurses, doctors, and social workers) for and against this ruling and responses from the Secretary of Public Welfare Harry Shapiro, who did not support the directive and left the agency in January 1959; Ruth Grigg Horting, who replaced Shapiro as Secretary of Public Welfare; and Rev. Dr. Jesse Reber, Chairman of the State Board of Public Assistance.
  • News Releases, 1955-1964, 1972-1974. {Series #23.4}
    • News releases issued by the Governor's Office and the Office of Public Information of the Department of Public Welfare. Topics include annual budgets, building projects at state schools and hospitals, medical coverage for the aged, new studies initiated by the Department, new committees formed, welfare fraud, contracts to vendors, public events connected with mental health month and women's issues.
  • Speeches, 1955-1962. (2 folders) {Series #23.5}
    • Transcripts of speeches delivered by Secretaries of Public Welfare Harry Shapiro (1958) and Ruth Horting (1959-1962) to such audiences as the Pennsylvania General Assembly, the Institutional Nursing Conference, the Association for Retarded Children, Governor's Committee on Children and Youth, the Joint Appropriations Committee, the Family Rehabilitation Program, Subcommittee on Problems of the Aged and Aging, Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, and the United States Senate among others. Topics include the status of Pennsylvania's mental health care system, feminization of poverty, nurse staffing for state hospitals, and problems facing mentally retarded and/or delinquent children.
  • State Institution Files, 1959-1971. {Series #23.6}
    • Files of Deputy Secretary of Public Welfare Norman V. Laurie containing meeting packets and minutes of the State Board of Public Welfare for December 3, 1970 and for January 7, February 4, and March 23, 1971. Also present are miscellaneous documents pertaining to meetings held through August 12, 1971. In addition, there are reports on medical inspections of youth development centers (1964), Fayette County's medical clinics, juvenile delinquency, the Juvenile Court Judges Committee, and on various children's homes or institutions including the Glen Mills School, Christ Home, Carlisle Day Care Center, and the Farm School for Girls.
  • State Supervised Hospitals' History File, 1914-1973. {Series #23.10}
    • Primarily reports of inspections of hospitals that received state funding. Included in this Series are correspondence, copies of disaster plans and personnel policies, inspection reports, notes of inspectors, fire inspection reports, hospital by-laws, and photographs. Inspection reports provide the following information: the date the hospital was organized, names of owners of the hospital, names of the medical and administrative staff, and assessments of the quality of the social service department, business office, nurses' station, and the surgical and obstetrical departments. Correspondence often provides information concerning code violations and the corrective measures taken. Among the many hospitals mentioned are Rolling Hill, Shadyside, Tri-County, Carlisle, Kane Summit Stetson, F.W. Black Community, Adrian and Allegheny Valley. This series includes information on Pennsylvania women's hospitals.
  • Women Nurses' Payroll Book, 1917-1923. {Series #23.48}
    • This Series was a predecessor to the Payroll Record Books, 1924-1938 & undated {Series #23.43}. Entries list name of employee, position, dates worked, pay per month, actual amount paid, and signature of payee.
  • Daily Report Books of Male and Female Wards, 1879-1956. {Series #23.21}
    • Reports on morning and afternoon activities in the patient wards. Each category records the number of patients engaged in an activity. Activities listed for persons under the "occupied" category include: out on parole, riding, attending church in town, to the conservatory, out walking, in airing court, sewing room, laundry, kitchen, ward work, reading and writing, sewing, indoor and outdoor games, and other. "Unoccupied" categories include: sickness, unwillingness or unfavorable weather. Other categories are: in bed during the day; wet and dirty during the day; wet and dirty during the night; secluded; restrained; or at chapel. Later volumes starting in the 1920s include restraint and seclusion divided by gender, ball games, dances, chapel, movies, farm and garden, domestic work, and O.T. (occupational therapy) in ward or shop.
  • Public Information Motion Picture Films, 1948-1976. {Series #23.340}
    • Films are 16mm print reels documenting the public information activities of the Department of Public Welfare. The printed 1979 Film Catalog provides information on the dates some reels were produced and descriptions of their content. Subjects include child behavior, brain damaged children, mental retardation, behavior therapy, depression, fertility, birth, motherhood, learning, senility , mental hospitals, mental health, psychosis, psychiatry, shyness, and stress. Some titles include:
        • "Walk Down Any Street"
        • "Who is Sylvia?"
        • "Responsibility"
        • "A Study of Maternal Attitudes"
        • "Phoebe"
        • "The Trouble with Women"
        • "Lisa"
        • "The New Girl"
        • "Family Circus"
        • "From Six to Nine"
  • Female Attendants' Payroll Books, 1890-1917. {Series #23.23}
    • Records documenting salaries and wages paid to employees at Danville State Hospital. Information provided includes name of employee, types of work, dates worked, pay per month, amount, and signature of payee. Types of positions documented include attendant, supervisor, assistant supervisor, night watch, nurse and attendant.
  • Female Admission Registers, 1884-1923. {Series #23.24}
    • These volumes document the admissions of female patients into Danville State Hospital. Information given about each patient includes name, age, marital status, color (white, black, mulatto) and occupation; county of residence and country or state of birth; number of children and number of siblings; admission number, any previous admission numbers, census of hospital at the time of admission, and admission date. Commitment information includes name of payee, by whom committed (friends, court, or overseer of the poor); whether an insane convict or criminally insane; bodily condition; name of physical disorder, if any; name of mental disorder; supposed cause of insanity; complications (epileptic, suicidal, homicidal, idiot, paralytic, imbecile); duration of attack in years, months and days; and number of attacks and age of first attack. Register also provides information on the date of discharge and reason (death, restored, improved, not improved); cause of death; the number of years, months, days in hospital; the names of relatives also suffering symptoms of insanity; and remarks.
  • Alphabetical Register of Female Patients, [ca. 1886-1926] {Series #23.16}
    • Grouped by the first letter of last name. Alphabetical register of female patients giving name of patient, register number in Female Admission Registers, 1884-1923 {Series #23.24}; name, address, and county of the person to be notified; the name address and county of the person who was financially responsible for the patient; the date of discharge and any remarks.
  • Record Book of Female and Male Epileptics, 1887-1891. {Series #23.44}
    • Grouped by gender, and thereunder arranged chronologically by date of seizure. A monthly tally of patients suffering from seizures. Information given includes lists of names of male or female patients and month and year of the attack. Each month has check marks for each seizure suffered during the month. At the end of the month the check marks are totaled. The first 22 pages of this volume are missing.
  • Minutes of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors, 1885-1945. {Series #23.104}
    • The minutes of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors document administrative decisions concerning the daily operations of the hospital. Information given includes names of the members of the committee, the number of patients on the census, expenses paid, and general discussions of hospital affairs. Of interest to scholars studying women's history is a resolution in the 1885 volume stating that "the number of diseased women is so few that the appointment of a female physician ...is not needed; and when such cases do occur, the females would prefer...a male physician, because they insist that they are more sympathetic and, in their treatment, more considerate of their feelings, than female physicians."
  • Day and Night Report Books, 1936-1937. {Series #23.71}
    • Reports on the daily and nightly activities of female patients. Information given includes names of patients who were transferred or admitted, names of patients who had seizures or required special attention, the total number of patients on the census, the names of attendants, and the date and time of day covered by the report.
  • Female Patients' Clothing and Property Book, 1890-1903. {Series #23.83}
    • A record of the belongings of female patients in the care of the Western Pennsylvania Hospital for the Insane at Dixmont. Information provided regarding each patient's property includes the name of the patient, the date of admission and the items on their person at that time, dates and names of additional items that were acquired, where the additional items were acquired, and where the property was stored. Also present are receipts for items that were placed in the safe or were transferred to another institution.
  • Hydro-Therapy Reports, 1913-1923. {Series #23.91}
    • The reports contained in the volumes are arranged in chronologically by year and thereunder alphabetically by patient's surname. Reports contained in folders are loose papers arranged in reverse date order by date of treatment. These records document hydro-therapeutic treatments performed at the Dixmont Hospital. The volumes record treatments for female patients while the loose folders record treatments for both the male and female wards. Information given includes the patient's name, date of treatment, type and extent of treatment given, and remarks noting how the patient responded to the treatment. Monthly reports detail the type and number of treatments applied to patients.
  • Record of Condition of Female Patients When Received, 1876-1904. {Series #23.119}
    • Record of the physical condition and outward physical appearance of female patients at the time of their arrival. Information found includes the patient's name, the date they were received, the cleanliness of their clothing and hair, their physical condition such as whether they had bruises or carried lice, and the name of supervisors and assistants.
  • Superintendent's Reports, 1928-1932. {Series #23.126}
    • Monthly reports prepared for members of the Executive Committee by the Superintendent detailing hospital activities. Information found includes tables showing admissions, discharges and deaths; statistical data on the male and female departments; and a breakdown of the productive output of the Arts and Crafts Department, Farm and Garden Department, and Male Industrial Department. This series includes information on Pennsylvania women's hospitals.
  • Account of Clothing Issued to Female Patients, 1851-1862. {Series #23.136}
    • A record of clothing issued to female patients. Information given includes each patient's name, registration number, admittance date and a list of the clothing items issued to her.
  • Annual Reports of the Harrisburg State Hospital, 1851-1921. {Series #23.145}
    • Annual Reports of the trustees and superintendent of the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital. Information provided for each year includes a list of hospital officers (board of trustees, superintendent, physician, assistant physician, steward, matron, and treasurer), a narrative report by the superintendent, a summary statement of receipts and expenditures, and the steward's annual statement. Reports after 1852 include a report by the physician of the female department. Statistical charts at the end of each report document admissions and discharges for the year. Statistical information includes the number of patients each age category admitted; the nativity, residence, occupation and civil condition of those admitted; how they were supported (private or indigent); the assumed cause of insanity, the form of disease and complications of those admitted; and the number of attacks, admissions, and the duration of insanity before entrance to the hospital. Additional information on disease and recovery includes the age and nativity of those recovered; the number of discharged recovered; the duration of the disease before treatment; the duration of treatment; and the form, cause and total duration of the disease among those who recovered. This series includes information on female patients.
  • Daily Registers, 1851-1969. {Series #23.156}
    • A daily record of the number of patients at the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital and Harrisburg State Hospital. Information given includes the date and day of the week, the average number of males and females admitted per day, the average number of males and females who were admitted, paroled and discharged per month and the number of patients who recovered or died during the month. The registers from 1880-1895 only list female patients while registers from 1881-1905 and 1905-1930 list only male patients.
  • Electroshock Treatment Record Book, [ca. 1941-1958]. {Series #23.158}
    • A record of patients treated with electroshock therapy at the Harrisburg State Hospital. Information found includes the patient's name, date of treatment, and the voltage administered. A large majority of the patients listed in the electroshock therapy books are female.
  • Medical Case Book, 1851-1867. {Series #23.177}
    • Medical case book for male and female patients at the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital. Information given includes name, age, sex, occupation, marital status, appearance of the patient upon admission, and physical characteristics and temperament. Also included is a description of the mental disorder; the manner and period of the attack, any changes produced in the patient's temper or disposition, and whether the patient exhibited any failure of memory or understanding, symptoms of epilepsy, paralysis, tremulous movements of the tongue, defects in articulation, or weakness or unsteadiness of gait. The case book also usually gives what was believed to be the predisposing cause of the attack, notes whether the patient had experienced any former attacks, reveals whether the most recent attack had been preceded by any premonitory symptoms such as restlessness, unusual elevation or depression of spirits, or any deviation from ordinary habits and conduct. Finally, any previous treatment are noted and whether the was subject to personal restraint.
  • Medical Case Books of the Female Department, 1880-1922. {Series #23.178}
    • Case books for female patients at the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital and Harrisburg State Hospital give the patient's name, age, sex, occupation, marital status, the appearance of the patient upon admission, habits and temperament, the appearance of the eyes, any unusual expressions, any peculiarity in the form of the head, and the physical state of the vascular, respiratory, and abdominal organs. The pulse, tongue, skin, were urine were tested and the presence of bruises or other injuries noted. Also included is a description of the mental disorder; the manner and period of the attack, a minute account of the symptoms and the changes produced in the patient's temper or disposition, whether the malady displayed itself in illusions or irrational conduct, morbid or dangerous habits or propensities, and whether it had occasioned any failure of memory or understanding or was connected with epilepsy, paralysis, tremulous movements of the tongue, defects in articulation of speech, or weakness or unsteadiness of gait. Possible predisposing causes are given such as former illnesses or whether the present illness had been preceded by any premonitory symptoms such as restlessness, unusual elevation or depression of spirits, or any remarkable deviation form ordinary habits and conduct. Previous treatments are noted as well as whether the patient subject to personal restraint. During the first month after admission, entries were to be made at least once in every week or, in certain cases, when the nature of the case required it. In all cases, an accurate record was to be kept of the medicines administered and other remedies employed, the outcome of the treatments, and any injuries or accidents.
  • Medical Journals, 1922-1936. {Series #23.180}
    • Weekly journals documenting the total number of male and female patients who were sent to the Harrisburg State Hospital and the conditions for which they were admitted. Information given for each week includes the date, the total number of both indigent and private patients in the hospital, and the number of patients who were employed, restrained, secluded and under medical treatment, violent or had died.
  • Register of Female Patients, 1852-1884. {Series #23.198}
    • Partially indexed externally in the Index to Register of Patients, 1851-1881 {Series #23.167}. Register of female patients admitted to the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital. Information given includes the patient's name, registration number, admission date, civil condition, age, nativity, place of residence and occupation. Also recorded is the duration of attack prior to admission, type of commitment and financial arrangement, the apparent cause and form of the disease, the nature of any complications and the outcome, the date of discharge, the total period of residence at the hospital and any remarks.
  • Ledger of Patient Accounts, 1851-1866. {Series #23.172}
    • A record of patient accounts for the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital. For each account the name of the individual responsible for payment is given together with the patient's name, the amount of the payment for room and board, and the amounts charged for items purchased. The ledger also lists unsettled accounts for those patients who left the hospital. A folder at the back of the ledger contains several items relating to the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital such as blank circulars, several receipts, and a statement of stock operations for the months October - December 1887 and January - July 1888, and two copies of Women's Act No. 466.
  • Miscellaneous Manuals, Reports and Related Printed Materials, 1934-1967. {Series #23.344}
    • Titles of the publications include "Illegitimacy and its Impact on the Aid to Dependent Children Program," by United States Department of Health Education and Welfare, (1960); "Pennsylvania Laws Relating to the Handicapped," by the Governor's Committee for the Handicapped, (undated); "Origin and Development of Public Assistance in Pennsylvania," by the Department of Public Assistance (1958); "Relief Population of Pennsylvania," (1936); "Public Assistance in Pennsylvania," by the Joint State Government Commission (1951); "Bureau of Personnel Report" (1966); "What's New About Welfare in Pennsylvania," (undated); and others.
  • Institutional Population Records, [ca. 1882-1920]. {Series #23.345}
    • Admission records for the following treatment facilities: Allegheny City Home, 1884-1886, 1888; Burn Brae, 1884-1888; Danville State Hospital, 1883-1888; Pennsylvania Hospital for Insane (Philadelphia), 1883-1888; Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital (Harrisburg), 1883-1888; Philadelphia Hospital, 1884-1888; Pittsburgh City Farm Insane Asylum, 1884-1886, 1888; St. Francis Hospital (Pittsburgh), 1887-1888; Schuylkill County Almshouse, 1883-1888; and the "Friends Asylum" (Frankford), 1883-1888. A record of admissions, transfers, and deaths or discharges of patients maintained by institutions that cared for the mentally ill or the indigent. Each hospital's records are arranged uniquely and the records of some institutions are more extensive than are others. Information provided about generally consists of the patient's name; date of admission, transfer, death or discharge; occupation and gender; registration number; a detailed medical history; and a description of the patient's psychological state at the time of commitment. Of particular value to researchers is information found on the "Order for the Reception of a Patient" forms. Categories of data normally found on these forms include the date of admission; the patient's name, sex, age, and residence during past year; marital status, number of children, occupation or name of employer; names of living parents, the residence of any living brother or sister, and the name and residence of any other known relative; the earliest date upon which symptoms were noted, the circumstances surrounding the first onset of symptoms, the names and addresses of all medical attendants treating the patient for the preceding two years, and the name, occupation, and relationship of the person petitioning for the patient's commitment. Also found is the date of certification and the name, residence and credentials of each certifying physician, magistrate or judicial officer.
  • Records of Admissions, Discharges and Deaths at State Institutions, [ca. 1882-1920]. {Series #23.348}
    • Records of patient admissions, discharges, and deaths originally sent to the Committee on Lunacy by the following hospitals: Philadelphia Hospital for the Insane, Harrisburg State Hospital, Rittersville Hospital, Danville State Hospital, Wernersville Hospital, Torrance State Hospital, Adams County Hospital, Allegheny County Hospital, Mercer County Hospital, Hillside Home, Lancaster County Hospital, Elk County Hospital, Chester County Hospital, Blair County Hospital, Easton Sanitarium, St. Francis Hospital, Retreat State Hospital, Burn Brae Hospital, Schuylkill County Hospital, and others. Types of documents include Notices of Admission that are signed by the superintendent of the hospital and the medical examiner stating the patient is mentally impaired and voluntary admission requests signed by the patient. Orders for the Reception of a Patient normally provide the name, sex, age, residence, marital status, number of children, occupation, trade or employment of the patient; names of living parents; date of admission; residence of any living brother or sister; name and residences of any other known relative; date from which insanity was supposed to have existed and the circumstances that induced such belief; names and addresses of all medical attendants treating the patient for the past two years; name, occupation, and relationship of the person petitioning for commitment of the patient; and such certification particulars as the date of certification and the name, residence and credentials of each certifying physician, magistrate or judicial officer.
  • Administrative File of the Secretary of Welfare, 1955-1958. {Series #23.349}
    • Administrative files of Secretary of Welfare Henry Shapiro containing published reports, correspondence with other agencies, memoranda on hospital hearings, drawings and specifications for building construction, reports on migrant children and families, and letters concerning state hospitals with regard to such topics as chaplaincy, burning trash, budgeting, and administration of drugs. Topics covered include the Haverford Mental Health Center, personnel issues, youth camps, and programs for women.
  • Reports on County Poor Relief, 1932-1939. {Series #23.353}
    • Reports compiled by field representatives of the Bureau of Assistance and submitted to the Secretary of Welfare to assist in preparing recommendations to the Directors of the Poor of each county. The reports consist of evaluations of county homes and almshouses, the number of children in foster care, and the status of children's programs. Information found consists of the names, titles, and salaries of staff; population statistics; information concerning plant and equipment; and an evaluation of the care and treatment of residents. Also present are weekly menus, newspapers articles, and reports on investigations undertaken as a result of complaints received.
  • Reports, 1937-1938. (3 volumes) {Series #23.370}
    • Reports on strategies for providing public relief to destitute Pennsylvanians during the Great Depression. The report dated November 16, 1937 is a response by a Mr. de Schweintz to changes in the State strategy that were ordered by a Mrs. Emma Jeffrey Miller. The second report dated December 16, 1937 was issued by the Governor's Relief Survey Committee and a report dated January 3, 1938 is a commentary on the Governor's Relief Survey Committee Report.
  • Correspondence with Dr. Henry I. Klopp, Superintendent of the State Homeopathic Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania, 1912-1922. {Series #23.372}
    • Correspondence received and sent Dr. Henry I. Klopp concerning the establishment of an occupational room for women at the Pennsylvania State Lunatic Hospital, the need of a special supply account for supplies, employee wage increases, hospital rate charges, out patient clinics, and the price of animals, farm equipment and household supplies.
  • Admission Book of the Insane Department of the Pittsburgh North Side City Home, 1911-1916. {Series #23.232}
    • Admission book documenting admissions to the Insane Department of the Pittsburgh North Side City Home. Information given is the patient's name, age, race, gender, social class, place of birth, marital status, former place of residence, previous register number, name of the person who ordered the commitment, the nature of the mental disorder, the date of admission, the date of discharge and/or death, and the reason for discharge where applicable.
  • Admission Registers, 1925-1941. {Series #23.233}
    • Registers documenting the admission of patients into Mayview State Hospital. Information includes the patient's name, case number, age, gender, date of admission, and the name of the person who ordered the commitment. Additional information found in the register entries dated prior to September 24, 1929 is race and marital status.
  • Alms House Registers, 1876-1884. {Series #23.234}
    • Registers documenting the admission of destitute people to the almshouse. Information given includes the person's name, age, gender, marital status, place of birth, any foreign countries in which they may have traveled, religious affiliation, race, occupation, former address, date of admission, date of discharge or death, the name of facility from which transferred, length of residence in the Pittsburgh area, the number and ages of any dependents, and the circumstances surrounding their arrival at the Alms House.
  • Case Book of Allegheny City Farm, 1884-1887. {Series #23.236}
    • Indexed internally, alphabetically by surname of patient. Case book documenting the history of patients from the time of admission until the time of release at Allegheny City Farm. The book contains a Series of entries made on different dates charting the medical progress of patients. The entries are not made in a consistent fashion and primarily consist of observations of the results rather than descriptions of the treatments applied. Information generally given includes the patient's name, age, gender, color, place of birth, marital, status, date of admission; condition upon admittance, and the presumed cause of illness.
  • Case Books of Pittsburgh City Home and Hospital, 1879-1912. {Series #23.237}
    • Case books documenting the history of patients from the time of admission until the time of release from the Pittsburgh City Home and Hospital. The books contain a Series of entries made on different dates charting the medical progress of patients. The entries are not made in a regular fashion and primarily consist of observations of results rather than descriptions of treatments applied. Information generally given includes the patient's name, age, gender, date of birth, race, place of birth, occupation, marital status, patient case number, names and nativity of parents, an assessment of the patient's physical and mental condition, and a statement of diagnosis.
  • Patient History Books, 1879-1884. {Series #23.239}
    • Patient history books documenting the medical history of patients and their families. Information may include patient's name, age, gender, nativity, race, place of residence, educational level, marital status and length of time married, number of children, age of youngest child, occupation, religious affiliation, parent's place of residence and nativity, the reason for the commitment, the duration of the insanity, details concerning the attacks, personal habits, dates of admission and discharge, and the name of the person who committed the patient.
  • Admission Book of the Insane Department of the Pittsburgh North Side City Home, 1911-1916. {Series #23.232}
    • Admission book documenting admissions to the Insane Department of the Pittsburgh North Side City Home. Information given is the patient's name, age, race, gender, social class, place of birth, marital status, former place of residence, previous register number, name of the person who ordered the commitment, the nature of the mental disorder, the date of admission, the date of discharge and/or death, and the reason for discharge where applicable.
  • Admission Registers, 1925-1941. {Series #23.233}
    • Registers documenting the admission of patients into Mayview State Hospital. Information includes the patient's name, case number, age, gender, date of admission, and the name of the person who ordered the commitment. Additional information found in the register entries dated prior to September 24, 1929 is race and marital status.
  • Alms House Registers, 1876-1884. {Series #23.234}
    • Registers documenting the admission of destitute people to the almshouse. Information given includes the person's name, age, gender, marital status, place of birth, any foreign countries in which they may have traveled, religious affiliation, race, occupation, former address, date of admission, date of discharge or death, the name of facility from which transferred, length of residence in the Pittsburgh area, the number and ages of any dependents, and the circumstances surrounding their arrival at the Alms House.
  • Case Book of Allegheny City Farm, 1884-1887. {Series #23.236}
    • Case book documenting the history of patients from the time of admission until the time of release at Allegheny City Farm. The book contains a Series of entries made on different dates charting the medical progress of patients. The entries are not made in a consistent fashion and primarily consist of observations of the results rather than descriptions of the treatments applied. Information generally given includes the patient's name, age, gender, color, place of birth, marital, status, date of admission; condition upon admittance, and the presumed cause of illness.
  • Case Books of Pittsburgh City Home and Hospital, 1879-1912. {Series #23.237}
    • Case books documenting the history of patients from the time of admission until the time of release from the Pittsburgh City Home and Hospital. The books contain a Series of entries made on different dates charting the medical progress of patients. The entries are not made in a regular fashion and primarily consist of observations of results rather than descriptions of treatments applied. Information generally given includes the patient's name, age, gender, date of birth, race, place of birth, occupation, marital status, patient case number, names and nativity of parents, an assessment of the patient's physical and mental condition, and a statement of diagnosis.
  • Patient History Books, 1879-1884. {Series #23.239}
    • Patient history books documenting the medical history of patients and their families. Information may include patient's name, age, gender, nativity, race, place of residence, educational level, marital status and length of time married, number of children, age of youngest child, occupation, religious affiliation, parent's place of residence and nativity, the reason for the commitment, the duration of the insanity, details concerning the attacks, personal habits, dates of admission and discharge, and the name of the person who committed the patient.
  • Register of Discharges and Deaths, 1950-1958. {Series #23.240}
    • A record of persons who were discharged from or died in the Mayview State Hospital. Information found includes the patient's name, gender, case number, discharge and/or death number, condition at time of discharge, any observed results of treatment, and disposition notes regarding the discharge of patients. Totals are given for each month and year.
  • Annual Reports of the Norristown State Hospital, 1882-1959. {Series #23.245}
    • Printed annual reports containing lists of expenditures and receipts and statistical breakdowns revealing the number of patients admitted and discharged, their places of birth and counties of residence, occupations, marital status, ages, and whether by friends, overseers of the Poor or the courts. Also found are breakdowns on the types and alleged causes of insanity (old age, sunstroke, scarlet fever, domestic trouble, religious excitement and others), the duration of the disease before admission, causes of deaths, and the number of private patients. In addition to the statistical tables, there are lists of the names of those patients who recovered and those that died. These lists give their age, sex, race, country of origin, form of insanity, cause of insanity, period of residence, whole duration of attack, number of attacks, and age at first attack of insanity. Some reports show expenses and income from the farm and the soap and brush factories. There are separate reports for the men's' and women's' departments and they provide the names of staff members and their occupations, pathologist and medical reports, and information on patient amusement activities and religious instruction.
  • Audio Tapes and Motion Picture Films, 1961-1962, 1968. {Series #23.248}
    • The audio tapes bear the following labels: Spot Announcements for Mental Health Week, Dr. Saradure WIFI 11/61; Miss Lynch WIFI, 11/61; Dr. Magure Cast WFLN 11/61; Russian; men's club 12/61; Schell, Dipicco 12/21/61; Don Shrift 3/19/62; J. Clark-A. Tait 5/15/62; H. Ewing 6/26/62; and staff conference women's C.A.S.T. The motion picture films are labeled "What Norristown State Hospital Provides," (8mm) and "Advances in Drug Management of Schizophrenia," (16mm).
  • Daily Register of Admissions, Visits, Deaths and Discharged Female Patients, 1938-1940. {Series #23.253} Daily register of admissions, deaths, and
    • Discharges of female patients at Norristown State Hospital. Information provided about each patient includes date of admission, folio patient number, name, whether a new admission or returning from a visit, whether private or indigent, the county and district of residence, date of discharge, and method of discharge for private and indigent (discharged, died, visited, eloped). There are statistical totals for each category of information and some patients are noted as being prisoners.
  • Index of 1,180 Post Mortems of the Insane, 1938-1940. {Series #23.255}
    • A printed book that details the mental disease suffered by each patient who died, their age and gender, and a description of any other physical problems. Each entry also gives the weight of the brain in grams. This series includes female patients.
  • Annual Reports of the Committee on Lunacy, 1885, 1887-1890. {Series #23.244}
    • Each printed volume contains narratives on cases sent to the Committee on Lunacy by county or municipal overseers of the poor during a particular year. Also present are statistical breakdowns of the patient population at both state and private hospitals and asylums and narratives describing the nature of the population in the area served, the names of managers, the value of real estate and personal property, descriptions of new buildings and their capacity, receipts and expenditures, names of attendants, number of admissions and discharges, and information concerning employees, the library and amusements, restraints, diet, worship services, and the condition of the patients. Some reports have pullout maps, drawings and architectural renderings of county and state hospital and asylum buildings. Statistical breakdowns of the patient population by occupation, gender, race, whether insane or epileptic or other, the causes of mortality, types of diseases and number of patients exposed to disease outbreaks are also found.
  • Death Registers of Females, 1909-1942. {Series #23.276}
    • Registers of the deaths of female patients at the Philadelphia State Hospital. Information provided about decedents generally includes the name, register number, date of admission, form of mental disorder; age at death, race, religion, marital status, place of birth, occupation, length of time at hospital, date and cause of death, and the name of the person by whom committed.
  • Discharge Registers of Females, 1907-1942. {Series #23.278}
    • Registers of discharges of female patients from the Philadelphia State Hospital. Information given about each patient includes the name, register number, date of discharge and last admission, age when discharged died, race and social condition, form of mental disorder; condition as a result of treatment when discharged, and where the patient went after release.
  • General Registers of Female Patients, 1895-1908, 1920-1939. {Series #23.280}
    • Admission registers for female patients to the Philadelphia State Hospital. Information given about each patient may include the patient's name, race, date or register number of any previous admission, current register number, date of admission, date of discharge or death, place of birth, marital status and number of living children, age when admitted and at first attack, number of subsequent attacks, county of residence, occupation, educational level, form of mental disorder and supposed cause, name of the person by whom committed or removed, and the name of relatives who were also insane.
  • Patient Characteristics and Statistical Register Book, 1940-1942. {Series #23.284}
    • A daily statistical register of the number of male and female patients on the census and of those paroled, escaped, and returned. Information given includes census data children, epileptics, feebleminded (not insane) patients, tuberculosis patients, and "colored" patients. For each date, two sets of entries are found, one for the Philadelphia State Hospital and the other for the Children's "camp" program. The statistical register gives information on the number of persons admitted, discharged, and died for that day and for the year.
  • Admission Registers, 1900-1980. {Series #23.288}
    • Male and female admission registers for Retreat State Hospital. Information given is the patient's name, case number, date of admission, whether privately or publicly supported, and the date of discharge or death. More detailed admission information will be found in the General Registers, 1900-1968 {Series #23.293}.
  • Female Admission Books, 1883-1910. {Series #23.303}
    • Record books of admissions of female patients to Warren State Hospital. Information given includes about the patient's name, date of admission, a brief narrative statement of the circumstances under which she was admitted, and a brief diagnostic statement on her condition.
  • Female Case Books, [ca. 1883-1913.] {Series #23.304}
    • Case books documenting the medical history of female patients from the time of their admission until the time of their release. They contain of a Series of entries made on different dates charting the patients' progress but entries are not made regularly and primarily consist of observations rather than descriptions of treatments applied. Information generally includes the patient's name, age, marital status, native state and previous county of residence, date of admission, husband's occupation, and the presumed cause of illness. Other miscellaneous loose sheets are contained within the volumes, including correspondence from patients to their physicians and other supporting medical documentation.
  • Index to Female Case Books, [ca. 1883-1913]. (1 volume) {Series #23.306}
    • A complete index to the Female Case Books, ca. 1883-1913 {#23.304}. Information given is the name of the patient and the volume and page number of the relevant Female Case Book where the patient's record may be found.
  • Miscellaneous Large Photographs, undated. {Series #23.419}
    • Subjects include women's ward.

Record Group 25
Records of Special Commission

The records of temporary independent commissions have been placed in one record group. These commissions were temporary since they were created to perform a specific function for a specific duration. They were independent in that they were not established as dependent commissions under the purview of an ongoing executive department. As can be readily ascertained from their names, these commissions were formed to serve primarily as investigatory or planning bodies, or as vehicles to erect public monuments and promote the official commemoration of historic events.

Over the years, more than a hundred temporary special commissions were created by acts of the General Assembly to function as independent administrative bodies for limited periods of time under the jurisdiction of the Governor. Their life spans were determined by the amount of time required for them to fulfill their purposes. The typical commission consisted of some combination of private citizens appointed by the Governor, members from either or both the House and Senate, the Speaker of the House, the President pro-tempore of the Senate, and certain heads of state agencies whose functions were related to the purpose for which the commission was created. Special commissions generally met upon the call of their chairmen or presidents and operated under a set of prescribed rules and regulations. Some commissions possessed the power to subpoena witnesses, books and papers. Special commissions generally submitted final written reports on their activities to the Governor and the General Assembly.

The records of two special commissions established within parent agencies will be found within the records of their respective agencies. These are the Records of the Bicentennial Commission of Pennsylvania, 1968-1977 that are in Record Group 31, Records of the Department of Commerce and the Records of the Pennsylvania War History Commission, 1915-1920 that are in Record Group 19, Records of the Department of Military Affairs. Additional materials related to the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission will be found in Papers of Governor William A. Stone (Manuscript Group 181) and the Samuel W. Pennypacker Papers (Manuscript Group 171). Among the John S. Fisher Papers (Manuscript Group 159) are copies of the procedures and report of the Capitol Investigation Commission. For additional information on records generated by special commissions see also the Guide to the Records of Special Commissions in the Pennsylvania State Archives compiled by Henry E. Bown and edited by Roland M. Bauman (Harrisburg: 1979).

  • Minutes of the Executive Committee of the Independence Celebration Commission, [ca. 1922-1923]. {Series #25.36} Minutes of the Executive
    • Committee of the Independence Celebration. Information provided is date and location where meeting was held, names of those present, and a description of the business transacted. Included is a list of the names together with a brief description of each of the personnel of the Independence Celebration Commission and also a list of office receipts and supplies with the date received, requisition number, number of pieces, description of article, and name of firm from which received. Also present are memoranda concerning such topics as the scope and plan of the exhibition, condemnation of property along the Schuylkill River, and the role of women in previous exhibitions.
  • Minutes of the Commission's Executive and Women's Executive Committees, 1938. {Series #25.88}
    • Provides the names of members of the Women's Executive Committee, dates of meetings and of correspondence, names of members present for meetings or correspondent, and a description of the business transacted at meetings or subject of correspondence. Subject of correspondence generally involves appointments to the Women's Executive Committee.

Record Group 26
Records of the Department of State
Microfilmed

The Department of State is headed by the Secretary of the Commonwealth, whose office was established under the Constitution of 1776. The Secretary is the keeper of the Great Seal and the initial custodian for many of the official documents of State government. Election returns, the laws and resolutions of the General Assembly, and proclamations, veto messages and other recorded acts of the Governor are all filed with the Department of State. The Department is also responsible for the issuing of commissions to appropriate elected and appointed officials; the collection and examination of documents relating to the incorporation and regulation of corporations; the regulation of professional boxing and wrestling matches; and the administration of legislation relating to election procedures, professional licensing, and the operation of charitable organizations.

  • Charter Books, 1812-1875, {Series #26.108}
    • Transcripts of Articles of Incorporation filed with the Department of State. Information provided is date of incorporation, name of corporation, location of corporation, text of the articles of incorporation, names of the incorporators, date certified, and name of Secretary of Commonwealth. Charters include: Female Beneficial Society, Female Granville Society of Philadelphia, Benevolent Daughters of St. Thomas, Daughters of Absolam, Daughters of Zion of the Angolian Ethiopian Society of Philadelphia, United Daughters of the Wesley Society of Philadelphia, Benevolent Daughters of Wesley of the City and County of Philadelphia, United Benevolent Daughters of Zion, First African Baptist Female Union Society of Philadelphia, Society of the Female Daughters of Hosea, Female Methodist Assistant Society of Philadelphia, United Sisters' Society, Daughters of Aaron, Society of the Daughters of Isaiah, Daughters of Africa, Benevolent Daughters of Tyson, Philadelphia Association for the Moral and Mental Improvement of the People of Color, Rising sons and daughters of Lucretia Mott, Association of the Benevolent Daughters of Borrows, Female Rush Assistant Society of Pennsylvania, Union Benevolent Daughters of Elijah Society of Philadelphia, United Sons and Daughters of the Lovejoy Society of the City and County of Philadelphia, United Sons and Daughters of Joseph Henderson Society, United Sons and Daughters of Peter Spencer Association.
  • Bonds, Assignments, Contracts, Acts, Titles and Other Miscellaneous Documents From the Safe of Room 309, 1775-1949. (2 microfilm rolls) rolls #3758-3759 {Series #26.43}
    • Unarranged. Bonds, assignments, contracts, acts, titles and similar types of records relating to the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, General State Authority, State Highway and Bridge Authority, and State Treasurer. Also included are 12 deeds for the Capitol grounds and certified copies of joint resolutions proposing amendments to the US Constitution concerning the terms of office of the president, the prohibition of the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages, and women's suffrage.
  • Federal Campaign Expense Reports for the US House of Representatives, 1972-1981. {Series #26.58}
    • The Federal Election Commission, an independent regulatory agency established in 1975, maintains an online database of campaign expense data for candidates who have run for federal office. Information given includes the name and address of the campaign committee, signature of treasurer or other committee representative, and a breakdown of the expenditures. The types of organizations required to file such reports include medical associations, automotive and truck dealers associations, oil companies, hotels, financial institutions, research foundations, educational associations, political campaign committees, industrial and manufacturing associations, health centers, banks, hospital associations, human rights groups, transportation groups, construction groups, agricultural associations, tobacco and cigar manufacturers, labor unions, concerned citizens groups, consumer groups, foreign country advocacy groups, retailer associations, utilities, insurance groups, and women's groups.
  • Index of Academies, Colleges and Female Seminaries, undated. {Series #26.115}
    • An index to academies, colleges and female seminaries documented in an unspecified volume. Index entries provide the name of the educational institution and a page number. Female Seminaries listed include the Armstrong Female Seminary through until the York Female Seminary.
  • General Election Statistical Files, 1960-1984. {Series #26.60}
    • Consists of certifications of political affiliations by county, 1969-1973; certificates of election, 1960-1984; and files documenting affiliation of voters serving in the military, veterans, or emergency civilian service, 1977-1980. The Certifications of Political Affiliation give the names of the county and the county seat, date of report, and the number of both males and females registered as Republicans, Democrats, Constitutional, American Independent, or Other. The Certification Forms contain the signatures of the Commissioners of the County Board of Elections. The Election Certificates were signed by the Governor and the Secretary of the Commonwealth and certify the names of candidates who won public office. These give the name of the candidate, the date of the election, the office to which elected, and the date certified. The Military, Veterans, and Civilian Emergency Absentee Voters File gives the name of the category (serviceman, veteran or civilian), name of absentee voter, voting address, application number, party affiliation at time of primary election, and the signatures of the Commissioners of the County Board of Elections.
  • Registration Figures, 1950, 1960, 1964, 1966, 1967-1972. (1 microfilm roll) roll #3826 {Series #26.81}
    • Tables providing breakdowns by age and gender of party registration of certified voters in each county. Information provided is the number of male and female voters 21 years of age and over and between the ages of 18 and 20 for each political party. The party affiliation categories are usually given as Democratic, Republican, Constitutional, Nonpartisan or Independent, and "Other Parties" (which would include Socialists and Prohibitionist, etc.).
  • Records in the Secretary's Office as surveyed by the CWA Project, December 1933 to February 1934 (microfilm)
    • Includes a certified copy of Joint Resolution ratifying the proposed amendment of the U.S. Constitution extending the right of suffrage of Women, 17 Nov. l919 and a certified copy of resolution of Congress, acknowledgement of receipt of women's suffrage, 17 June 1919

Record Group 27
Records of
Pennsylvania's Revolutionary Governments

The Constitution of 1776 vested limited administrative and executive powers of the government of the Commonwealth in an elected council of twelve members known as the Supreme Executive Council. The primary function of the Council was to oversee the proper execution of the laws of the State. The Council was composed of one member from Philadelphia and one from each county. A president and vice president of the Council were selected from among the twelve by joint vote of the General Assembly and the Council.

Prior to the formal organization of the Supreme Executive Council in March, 1777, executive and military powers were exercised by the Committee of Safety and the Council of Safety. The Committee of Safety was appointed by resolve of the Provincial Assembly to supervise all military activities and matters relating to the defense of the State. The Committee first met on July 3, 1775, and continued to function until July of the following year, when it was replaced by the Council of Safety. The Council was created by the State Constitutional Convention of 1776 to assume executive responsibilities until the new constitutional government could be organized.

Functioning under the revolutionary governments was the Board of War, Navy Board and a Council of Safety (Second), which had been created in 1777. The Constitution of 1790 provided for a popularly elected governor with expanded executive powers to replace the Supreme Executive Council. The entire contents of this record group were microfilmed in 1979 and the resulting 54 rolls of microfilm were accompanied by a Guide to Microfilm of Pennsylvania's Revolutionary Governments, 1775-1790 edited by Harry E. Whipkey and compiled by Roland M. Baumann. This joint project was sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Bureau of Archives and History of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The guide provides a chronological listing of each frame of each microfilm roll giving date of entry, subject heading, and the frame number. In 1980 an Index to the Guide to the Microfilm of the Records of Pennsylvania's Revolutionary Governments, 1775-1790 in the Pennsylvania State Archives compiled and edited by Roland M. Baumann and Diane Smith Wallace was also published by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Both of these finding aids are available in the microfilm reference room. Both of these guides are also available for purchase at the State Bookstore in the Keystone Building.

  • Executive Correspondence and Petitions, 1775-1776 and undated. {Series #27.2}
    • A collection of the correspondence of and to the Committee of Safety, which also includes the petitions sent by various civilians and soldiers. This information covers a period from July 7, 1775-July 24, 1776 and undated. Types of documents found in this collection include letters sent to or from various members of the Committee; letters to the Council from various suppliers of boats, food and munitions; resolutions or extracts of minutes from Committee of Safety meetings; orders for civilians to appear before the Committee; lists and appointments of officers; lists of men taken prisoner and enemy prisoners of war; a copy of Congressional minutes directly affecting the Committee of Safety in Pennsylvania; oaths not to bear arms against the United States; oaths and pledges to deliver supplies; plans and drawings for stopping and obstructing enemy navigation on the Delaware River Channel and a list of articles for armed boats. Petitions to the Committee were usually posed by private citizens, and always signed by at least one petitioner. These petitions dealt with issues such as reimbursement for supplies used or services done; pleas for higher wages, money and supplies to families in need; and requests for discharges or leave due to illness. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Accounts, 1776-1777 and undated. {Series #27.7}
    • A collection of the receipts of the Council of Safety from July 20, 1776- April 16, 1777. The loose receipts in this collection contain specific information which includes the date of transaction, persons involved, the reason for the transaction and the amount of money or specific description of items exchanged. Information contained in these receipts include orders from officers for men, supplies, rations or meals, guns and ammunition; money paid to soldiers or private citizens for goods or services; inventory lists of stores and Steward's stores aboard the ship Montgomery; lists of settled accounts; reimbursement for women in private homes that gave soldiers meals; money paid to clean, mend, appraise, buy and sell guns; a gunlock factory account; money given to provide for families of militiamen; and reports by citizens of damages done to their homes when enemy military troops were quartered in their private homes during their absence. In cases where the military is mentioned, the receipt lists the purpose of the transaction as well as the name of the company, commanding officer and occasionally where that particular group of men were marching. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Executive Correspondence and Petitions, 1777-1790 & undated. {Series #27.28}
    • Executive correspondence of the Supreme Executive Council and petitions presented to Council. Most of the documents are dated, and mention of the recipient and sender, origin of letter or petition and occasionally the particular title or office of the recipient or sender, and the business of the correspondence. This Series includes correspondence between members of the Supreme Executive Council as well as correspondence between members of Council and the Second Council of Safety, Continental Board of War, commanders of the Continental Army, the State Navy Board, and Continental Congress. Petitions reached the Council from various people around the state in various positions: tradesmen involved in providing supplies or services to the armies, soldiers away from home seeking protection of their property and families, and women on the home front in need of aid, protection or supplies. Information found in this record includes but is not limited to: lists of British soldiers captured by capitulation; examinations of prisoners or witnesses in cases before the Council; returns and receipts of supplies and money exchanged; lists of men seeking commissions, extracts or requests for copies of minutes of meetings for Supreme Executive Council, General Assembly or Congress; resolutions of the Council, General Assembly or Congress; warrants made for arrest or seizure of goods, court martial sentences handed down by the Council, and prisoners of war; and proclamations made by the President of Council or the Council. Also of interest are a few letters or petitions in French, untranslated, to the Council members. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Executive Correspondence, 1776-1777 & undated. {Series #27.8}
    • The correspondence of the executive body of the Council of Safety from July 25, 1776- March 14, 1777 and undated. Information appearing in these papers includes letters and petitions to the Council pertaining to the purchase, sale and delivery of provisions, munitions, transportation, and pay of soldiers; civilians working for the province; the recruitment of men to serve as soldiers; depositions of civilians and soldiers; warrants of search; orders of appearance before the Council of Safety or court; extracts from Council minutes and resolutions made within meetings; civilian testimonies; pay schedules of soldiers; orders to be paid; lists of prisoners; battalion procedures; names of fords on Schuylkill River; letters specially sent to General George Washington, John Hancock and other known Continental officers; and resolutions passed and defensive measures discussed at the time General Howe's Army invaded Pennsylvania. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Minute Books, 1776-1777. {Series #27.9}
    • Minutes for the Council of Safety from July 24, 1776 through March 13, 1777. Each entry lists the date of the meeting and the names of members present. The Committee dealt with both military and civil matters in an attempt to keep order during a time of upheaval. Information appearing concerning military matters includes orders for supplies, munitions, accommodation and transportation for enlisted men; matters of pay; cases of military courts martial, discharges, desertion, prisoners of war and jails; appointment of officers; formation of regiments; and the raising of local militia and Continental Army regiments from Pennsylvania. Information also appears showing the Council's concern for and on civil matters including goods bought from ships and resold to civilians at extravagant prices; disputes over Continental currency and the negotiation of the prices for goods and services; resolutions in response to the threat of enemy armies in Pennsylvania and general mobilization for war; and matters of public disturbance which included rioting and loitering. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Minute Book, 1777. {Series #27.15}
    • A record of the meetings of the Second Council of Safety, established and working as a temporary governmental authority during the British invasion of eastern Pennsylvania in 1777. All meetings were held in Lancaster, Pennsylvania from October 17, 1777 through December 4, 1777. The purpose for the creation and work of the Second Council of Safety is clearly stated in an introductory general proclamation. Business discussed in meetings included warnings by the council to the general public against direct dealings with or aid to enemy troops currently in Pennsylvania; dealings with citizens recanting their allegiance to the United States in the presence of invading and occupying troops; the appropriation of personal goods from citizens to prevent them from falling into enemy hands; appointment of local citizens to be County Commissioners to further proportions of the military to be called out and to furnish military provisions; levying moneys advanced for substitutes; what to do with men who would neither join or send a substitute into the army; punishment for citizens who disobeyed Council Orders of "non-fraternization" with the enemy; settlement of prices for liquors and goods; permission given to commissioners to seize munitions, goods and food provisions from those who had aided the enemy or refused to take an oath of allegiance; appointment of Commissioners to carry out the afore mentioned orders; consideration of the issue of an Indian incursion into Westmoreland County; defense of frontiers; arrests of civilians dealing with the enemy; mention of hope of Spain and France helping in the American independence movement; raising of companies of men for militias; commissioners gathering arms, blankets and clothing; and lastly, the formal extinguishing of the Council's power when it was no longer needed. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Record Group 28
Records of the Treasury Department
Microfilmed

Though the Constitution of 1776 provided for a State Treasurer elected by the General Assembly, this method of selection changed in 1874 to direct popular election. The early powers and duties of the Treasurer were largely determined by legislation enacted in 1809 and 1811. The legislation defined the roles of the Treasurer and Auditor General relating to the payment and settlement of public money and accounts, abolished the Office of Comptroller General, and required the Treasurer to examine and revise settlements. The Treasury Department is responsible for the receipt and deposit of Commonwealth funds, the investment of certain money, the management of securities under its jurisdiction, the pre-auditing of requisitions, and the payment of State money upon proper authorization.

  • "Mothers' Pension" Account Books, 1913-1917. {Series #28.62}
    • A record of indigent, widowed, and abandoned mothers who were beneficiaries of state money provided for by the Act of April 29, 1913. It records the name and address of the mother; and the names and birthdates of her children.

Record Group 30
Pennsylvania State Police
Microfilmed

The Department of State Police was created in 1905 to help preserve law and order throughout the Commonwealth and to cooperate with and assist local law-enforcement officers in the apprehension of criminals. It was the first uniformed police organization of its kind in the United States. The State Highway Patrol in the Department of Revenue, which had originally been established in the Department of Highways in 1923 to enforce motor vehicle laws, was merged with the Department in 1937 to become the Pennsylvania Motor Police. The name of the changed to Pennsylvania State Police in 1943. In keeping with its responsibility to assist local police departments, the State Police administers professional training programs for municipal police, and provide direct assistance to State law enforcement agencies wishing to utilize the technical, scientific and data resources of the Department. They have jurisdiction in all political subdivisions in the state.

  • Ku Klux Klan General Files 1923-1940. {Series #30.18}
    • Various papers, election returns, rosters, and applications detailing Klan operations. The rosters and election returns were sent to the headquarters in Philadelphia, listing new Klan personnel and elected leaders. Each quarterly roster, 1933-1938, gave the number of new members received, those suspended or died, total number of members, loss and gains, as well as province number, Klan number, and official Klan name and address. Election returns, or 'Report of Officers Elect' give names, numbers, location of Klan, date of klonklave and location of klavern. Officer positions available were Exalted Cyclops, Klaliff, Klokard, Kludd, Kligrapp, Klabee, Klad, Klarogo, Klexter, Nighthawk, Klikann Chief, and Klokan nos. 1 and 2. Among the various papers are counter signs giving code and password cyphers once a Klan met necessary requirements and all memberships were paid up. National and Imperial countersigns were given and consisted primarily of state names. All were signed by Stouch, the Imperial authority of the KKK in Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The bottom half of the counter sign sheet consisted of a pledge of undertaking the proper instructions for guarding the passwords. The enlistment papers, 1924-1926, give company, troop number, rank, serial number, name, address (street, city, county), enlistment period, age, occupation, enlistment date, and signature of recruit. The age, height, weight, complexion, eye color, hair color, distinguishing marks, marital status, military service, education, qualifications, character, and general remarks. Enlistment papers available for Adams, Allegheny, Beaver, Carbon, Clarion, Crawford, Erie, Indiana, Lawrence, Mercer, Northumberland, Venango, Washington, and Westmoreland counties. There is a list for the Women of Unity Klan #17, New Jersey.

Record Group 33
Records of the Supreme Court of
Pennsylvania
Partially Microfilmed

By decision of the Provincial Assembly in 1722, the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania was initially required to hold sessions in Philadelphia and travel on circuit for the trial of other cases. After the Proprietary Government was superseded by the new Revolutionary government, the Court retained its trial and appellate powers.  Under the Constitution of 1776, the Court was also assigned certain chancery responsibilities. The duties of the justices as trial judges were eliminated outside of Philadelphia when the system of circuit courts was permanently abolished under the new state Constitution in 1834. The state Constitution of 1874 removed the Court's remaining specific trial responsibilities from Philadelphia County by providing for the abolition of the Court of Nisi Prius.

Appellate sessions of the Supreme Court were at one time held in several different locations. Now, the Court sits only in Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Pittsburgh. In addition to its appellate jurisdiction, the Supreme Court has original, but not exclusive, jurisdiction of habeas corpus cases, mandamus or prohibition of courts of inferior jurisdiction, and quo warranto involving any officer of State-wide jurisdiction. As part of its general administrative authority under the Commonwealth's unified judicial system, the Court is responsible for establishing rules governing the practices and conduct of all State Courts.

Eastern District

  • Divorce Papers, 1786-1815.{Series #33.41}
    • Case files for divorce cases brought before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in the Eastern District. Documents filed may include petitions (libels) for divorce, subpoenas for divorce, interrogatories, depositions, and decrees for divorce. In the divorce process, the original petition was made to the Supreme Court, accusing either the wife or husband of a particular marriage offense, and asking the Court to force his or her appearance before the justices. The Court would then issue a warrant for the appearance of the libellee, and questions would be drawn and statements taken for the libellant and libellee. The Court would then render its decision. Information provided by these papers includes names of the couple; date married; court term and case number; and reason for divorce. Illustrates ideas surrounding gender roles, marriage, and sexuality.
  • General Motion and Divorce Docket, 1750-1837 (Divorces 1800-1805 only). {Series #33.52}
    • This docket contains two separate sections, one being a record of rules, resolves and orders of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, and the other, a record of divorce cases brought before that court. The section entitled "General Motions" (1750-1837) documents the administrative workings of the Supreme Court by listing decisions made concerning general procedures, as well as specific cases. Topics include dealing with writs of habeas corpus and certiorari; pleas by general issue; new trials in arrest of judgment; admission of attorneys; the exchange of pleas and responses; filing times for affidavits; acts of assembly pertaining to the court; the setting or court dates for the Supreme, Circuit and Nisi Prius Courts; and the deaths and appointments of Chief Justices, Associate Justices, Prothonotaries, Criers, Commissioners of Bail and Tipstaffs. The "Divorce Docket" (1800-1805) contains copies of original petitions for divorce, as well as of the Court's judgments. Information provided includes names of husband and wife; reason for filing the divorce petition (abandonment, adultery, cruelty, previous unended marriage, etc.); names of referees; and the nature of the final judgment. Illustrates ideas surrounding gender roles, marriage, and sexuality.
  • Affidavits, 1770-1806. {Series #33.4}
    • Handwritten sworn statements relating to testimony for cases heard before the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, or to the need for other documents to be acquired (usually from England) for use in the proceedings. Types of affidavits present include affidavits to grant writs of error, motions, judgments and court orders. Information given about each affidavit may include names of plaintiff and defendant, court term and case number; date of appearance; particulars about the case, such as the amount of debt or location of property involved; and signatures of the aldermen, justices of the peace, Supreme Court Justices, and the Prothonotary involved. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Agreements, 1783-1811, 1814 & undated. {Series #33.6}
    • A collection of various types of agreements, including agreements for judgment, change of case, a preemptory rule for trial or a change of jury, to plead, accept bail, appear, file writs of error and habeas corpus, test a writ of certiorari, change a writ of fieri facias to hiberari facias, set a date for trial, amend writs and narratives, enter judgment quod computet, proceed if the defendant has died, and change or delete names of plaintiffs, defendants, attorneys, or date of the agreement's filing. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1961-1963, 1971-1984. {Series #33.7}
    • Petitions for allowance of appeal, and answers thereto, filed with the Prothonotary of the Eastern District of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Information given by petitioners includes Allocatur Docket number; petition number; names of appellant and appellee; name and address of attorney for appellant; date of filing; and a note as to whether petition was granted or denied. Also included is background information on the case (including previous courts heard in, and past case terms and numbers assigned); a description of past proceedings and judgments (sometimes including copies of court orders, opinions, other appeals, evidence used, and so on); and a notarized affidavit, signed by the appellant's attorney, attesting to the truth of the above information. Information given by the appellees' answers to the petitions includes (the same) Allocatur Docket and petition numbers; names of parties; name and address of attorney for appellee; a brief counter history of the case; arguments for denying the appeal; signature of the attorney; and date of filing. Each petition is either accompanied by an answer, or by a letter from the appellee's attorney stating that no answer will be filed. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Allocatur Dockets, 1924-1954, 1971-1999. {Series #33.8}
    • Docket of those cases from the Superior Court where litigants were allowed to petition the Supreme Court for a hearing. The information contained in these dockets includes names of plaintiffs, defendants and their attorneys; the Superior Court case number, and the term it was heard at that level; filing date of petition; date of acceptance or refusal; and other case information. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Amicable Actions Papers, 1782-1809. {Series #33.9}
    • Papers relating to amicable actions, which were entered by agreement of both the plaintiff and the defendant into court dockets. The agreements in this file show names of plaintiff, defendant and their attorneys; and occasionally the grounds for the suit. While most of these agreements were filed with the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, some document the appeals process to the High Court of Errors and Appeals. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Appearance and Continuance Dockets, 1740-1795.{Series #33.11}
    • Records of cases brought before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in the Eastern District. An Appearance Docket generally documents the initial proceedings of a case, while actions taken months or years later, after the appearance docket entry was completed, are listed in a continuance docket. Different types of dockets are found for different periods. From 1740 through September of 1795, the volumes may be either Appearance or Continuance Dockets, or combinations of both. From December of 1795 until 1829, there are generally both types of dockets for each term. From December of 1830 through 1837, however, only Continuance Dockets are found, while from 1838 on, all volumes are in the form of Appearance Dockets. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Appearance Dockets, 1795-1829, 1838-1953, 1965. {Series #33.12}
    • These basic Appearance Dockets for the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania mark the date that an original writ was issued by the Supreme Court, and whether it was a summons, capias or writ of error. Information given for each case includes the dates of the returnable papers; arguments and opinions; the decision rendered; the names of plaintiff, defendant, and attorneys; and the corresponding case number. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Appearance Papers, 1858-1879. {Series #33.13}
    • A collection of documents relating to cases listed in the Appearance and Continuance Dockets, 1740-1795 {Series #33.11} and Appearance Dockets, 1795-1829, 1838-1953, 1965 {#33.12} of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, Eastern District. Types of documents filed include attachments, pleas of garnishee, praecipes for attachment sur judgment, plaintiff's bills of cost, summons, rules to plead, recognizances sur appeal, rules of reference, certificates of reference, and praecipes for sums. Information typically provided by the papers for each case includes names of parties involved; court term and case number; dates and types of pleas entered; and more specific information about the case depending on the types and numbers of papers present. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Bundles of Miscellaneous Court Papers With Index, 1790-1883. {Series #33.23}
    • Within each bundle, dates of the papers may range anywhere within the 1790-1883 date span. Various documents filed with the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, including petitions, transcripts, maps of streets and land tracts, copies of opinions, affidavits, wills, charges of the court, and the Orphan's Court Rules for Northampton County in 1842. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Cases Stated File, 1783-1793 & undated. {Series #33.25}
    • Written statements of the facts involved in cases brought before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, accompanied by various supporting documents. The facts stated were agreed upon by both the plaintiff and defendant, and the statements themselves were submitted to the court for judgment without a jury. Types of cases involved include attachment, trespass, ejectment, probation of wills, and neglect to pay import duties. Information provided includes names of parties, court term and case number, nature of case, and amounts of debt and property involved. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Certiorari and Habeas Corpus Papers, 1753-1775, 1777-1787. {Series #33.26}
    • These papers were used together as a way to appeal a lower court's verdict. The Certiorari papers requested transcripts from a higher court to a lower court for review of the proceedings. The Habeas Corpus papers were writs used to bring a person before a court or judge, having as its function the release of a party from unlawful restraint. Information given on the certiorari includes names of plaintiff and defendant; names of attorneys and date filed. Additional information in the records may include the county where trial was originally held; court term; narratives stating the particulars about the case; and receipts for court costs. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Claims Docket, 1778-1779. {Series #33.28}
    • A record of cases heard and adjudged in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania against citizens accused of high treason. The cases involve claims made against the real and personal estates of the accused. Information given includes names of plaintiff, defendant, claimant, witnesses, and attorneys; amount of claim or debt; and date defendant acquired debt or property. Defendants include Oswald Eve, Joseph Galloway, and others. This type of legal action grew out of Chapter 784 of an Act of Assembly passes March 6, 1778, entitled "An Act for the Attainder of Divers Traitors if They Render Not Themselves by a Certain Day, and for Vesting Their Estates in this Commonwealth, and for more Effectually Discovering the Same and for Ascertaining and Satisfying the Lawful Debts and Claims Thereupon." A supplement was passed March 29, 1779, as Chapter 832. Other chapters relating to divesting forfeited estates include Chapters 818, 829, and 854. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Declarations, 1749-1802 & undated. {Series #33.34}
    • Statements of the specific reasons why a plaintiff had brought suit against a defendant. Information provided by these declarations includes names of plaintiff, defendant, attorneys for the State of Pennsylvania, and other attorneys involved; nature of the case; a description of pleas entered; and amount of debt, if any, in question. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Debit Sans Breve Papers, 1802-1805, 1810-1812. {Series #33.36}
    • Applications for payment of a debt without a writ or declaration. Included for each case is a statement by the plaintiff or defendant declaring that the defendant is indeed bound to the plaintiff for a certain amount of money, and also a warrant of the defendant's attorney certifying that his client does not deny his obligation to the plaintiff. Information provided by the papers includes names of plaintiff, defendant and their attorneys; occupation and county of residence of debtor; and amount of debt. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Depositions, 1778-1828. {Series #33.37}
    • Sworn statements relating to cases brought before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, given by witnesses unable to attend the trial. Information furnished by the depositions includes names of defendant, plaintiff, attorneys, justices, and commissioners involved; and the nature of the case. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Discontinuance Papers, 1783-1800. {Series #33.38}
    • Requests for the discontinuance of a judgment made to the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania by satisfied plaintiffs. Most cases represented involve payment of debts. Information provided includes names of plaintiff, defendant, attorneys, and the Prothonotary of the Supreme Court; and sometimes a description of the nature of the case or amount owed. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Equity Dockets, 1837-1874. {Series #33.43}
    • A record of equity in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Docket entries were generally begun one or two terms before the case was actually brought before the court. Entries provide such information as names of defendant, plaintiff, attorneys and witnesses involved and a listing of dates and types of documents filed or rules and judgments rendered. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Equity Papers, 1836-1875, 1877, 1880. {Series #33.44}
    • Papers relating to equity cases brought before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in the Eastern District. Types of papers filed include decrees, bills in equity, answers, replications, motions, subpoenas, injunctions, praecipes, and paper books. Information provided for each case includes court term and case number; names of parties and attorneys involved; nature of case; and outcome. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Escheat Papers, 1796-1822. {Series #33.45}
    • This Series was originally arranged in chronological order by the earliest document date with some case papers added. On September 29, 1787 "An Act to Declare and Regulate Escheats" became law. According to it, the law established a process by which the Commonwealth would incorporate the real and personal property of persons who died intestate or without heirs. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Interrogatories, [ca. 1787-1827]. {Series #33.56}
    • Lists of questions for witnesses beyond the jurisdiction of the court, asked by a court-appointed commission, and answered in the form of a written deposition which then served as evidence at the trial. Information provided by these lists includes names of plaintiff, defendant, and witnesses; a description of the nature of the case; and the questions asked. Requests for specific people to serve as commissioners may also be recorded. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Journals, 1895-1898. {Series #33.57}
    • Log books of appearances in the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in the Eastern District listing names of plaintiff and defendant, court term and case number, a brief description of the proceedings, and the journal entry number. In the back of each volume are lists of the cases tried by each justice giving journal entry numbers, and bearing notations when that particular justice also wrote the decision. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Judgment Dockets, 1756-1896. {Series #33.58}
    • The twelve volumes of indices contain the following information for each judgment: case title, court term when judgment was rendered, page number, and sometimes additional information on the settlement. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Minute Books, 1806-1816, 1819-1952. {Series #33.64}
    • Minutes of cases heard by the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and the Court of Nisi Prius in the Eastern District. Information provided includes names of plaintiff, defendant, attorneys and jurors involved; date of court session; and an account of the proceedings. Some entries are marked as to whether or not the case continues, or as to whether it was heard in the Supreme Court, or in Nisi Prius. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Minutes, 1788, 1793, 1795-1800, 1802-1804. {Series #33.65}
    • Minutes taken at sessions of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in the Eastern District. Information provided includes names of plaintiff and defendant; pleas entered; location of original indictment and trial; names of jury members; and nature of judgment rendered by the jury. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Case Papers, 1810-1813. {Series #33.66}
    • Records of cases decided by the Court, or by arbitration, including amicable action suits. Materials from the same case are normally filed together and may include pleas in abatement, affidavits of defense, subpoenas, narratives, rules of reference or arbitration, replications, court opinions, certificates of reference, amicable action papers, and reports. Information given about each case includes names of plaintiff, defendant, arbitrator, and attorneys; details of the case; and nature of the settlement. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Records of the Supreme Court of Nisi Prius, [ca. 1770-1800]. {Series #33.69}
    • This is a Series of volumes that contains a wide variety of miscellaneous Supreme Court records. Some types of records include Court Minutes; Coroner's Inquisitions; Proceedings in Cases; Lists of Marriage, Public Housekeepers, and Tavern Licenses issued. Volume 45 contains the "Pa. Sunday Court Records," which contain records of Fines and Forfeits, Tavern Licenses, Return of Public Housekeepers Recommended and Marriage Licenses. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Motions and Rules, 1789-1829. {Series #33.73}
    • A rule is an order, made by the court and drawn into form, which is obtained by the application of a party or his counsel. The request for a rule takes the form of a motion, which must normally be sustained by an affidavit. The motion is entered, either for a rule to show cause why a certain action should not be done, or for a rule absolute. The rule is then taken on motion, and a time is fixed for the argument. When the rule is taken, notice is given to the opposite party in the case, the matter is heard, depositions are taken, and the rule is then either discharged or made absolute. These files contain related rules and motions, as well as exceptions, opinions of the court, and other papers relevant to particular cases. Information provided about cases represented includes names of plaintiff and defendant, and types and dates of motions and rules made. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Opinions, 1842-1949. {Series #33.78}
    • Statements by Supreme Court justices of the reasons for the Court's judgment, finding or conclusion in a case (as opposed to a decision, which is the judgment itself). Information normally provided includes court term and case number; names of parties; original court of jurisdiction; argument date; nature of judgment; and name of justice who wrote the opinion. Some of the opinions appear in Pennsylvania Reports, and are marked with the corresponding volume number and page. Other materials accompanying the opinions may include paper books, and copies of dissenting opinions. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Perpetuation of Testimony Dockets, 1781-1801. {Series #33.84}
    • The volumes are indexed by first vowel in surname of complainant. Perpetuation of testimony refers to the transcribing of that testimony so that it can be read as evidence in a court. The entries in this volume were transcribed by the Prothonotary of the Supreme Court and document proceedings of equity in the form of complainants' declarations, calls of appearance by the court, and interrogatories of witnesses. The cases represented deal mainly with land titles and conveyances and information provided about them includes names of parties involved, and dates and locations of title transfers. The nature of the decision, however, is not revealed. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Petitions, 1781-1815.{Series #33.85}
    • These petitions were made to the Chief Justice and the Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Some reasons for the petitioning of the Court include the desire for a Special Court, for removal of a case to a United States Circuit Court, and for debtors to be released from jail in accordance to the Insolvent Debtors Laws of the Commonwealth. Other documents included with the petitions are depositions, affidavits, motions, commission and court returns, and a transcript of a lunacy proceeding. Information obtainable includes names of plaintiff, defendant, and creditors; personal and real estate involved; and information relating to foreigners and foreign vessels. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Petitions,1793-1818. {Series #33.91}
    • This Series contains the documents filed with the Supreme Court in connection with lunacy cases. Petitions were filed asking that a commission be established to investigate the defendant. The results of the investigation were filed as findings of an inquisition, and a committee of auditors was then being appointed to oversee the affairs of the defendant and his property, and submit a yearly report. Documents to be found in these files include petitions and affidavits, motions for commissions, writs de lunatico inquirendo, inquisition returns, admissions certificates, bonds of committees, reports of auditors, and committees' accounts. Information provided includes names of petitioner, defendant, committee members, inquisitors and deponents (witnesses); dates of petition, and assignment of commission; and the reason for the lunacy. Some cases have complete sets of documents from the original petition to the yearly auditor reports. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Settlement of Accounts Case Papers, 1776-1804. {Series #33.103}
    • The Office of the Comptroller General was created by "An Act for Methodizing the Department of Accounts of the Commonwealth and for the More Effectual Settlement of the Same" (Statutes at Large for Pennsylvania, Chapter CMLXX). The duties of this office entailed the settling and liquidation of claims against the Commonwealth and the keeping of records of men indebted to the state. First, the Comptroller General would determine the credibility of the debt. After his decision, the creditors petitioned the Supreme Court for relief. Account cases represented in the files involve the recovery of debts for and against the Commonwealth. Types of documents filed include examinations, depositions, records of audit settlements, narratives, recognizances, repeals of recognizances, and letters from the Comptroller. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Verdict Papers, 1804-1812 & undated. {Series #33.114}
    • Written verdicts which were delivered privately to the judge by the jury, known also as "privy verdicts." Other types of documents found include agreements, cases stated, and a rule to show cause. Information provided includes date of verdict, signatures of jurors, amount awarded, and to whom. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Writs of Habeas Corpus and Petitions, 1771-1863. {Series #33.118}
    • The petitions were originally made to the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, requesting that he issue a writ of habeas corpus which would then allow the petitioner to appear before the court to inquire into the legality of his confinement. Information provided by the petitions and their accompanying writs includes names of petitioner (detainee), reason for detention (including robbery, desertion, going AWOL, and not re-enlisting after being paid to do so), filing date, and action taken by the court. Other documents filed include manumissions, paper books, memoranda, processes, enlistment papers, and witness lists. Individuals named may include those in charge of jails and workhouses, military commanders of the Revolution, and a Vice Council of France. Most of the cases represented relate either to military affairs or slave holdings. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Writs of Habeas Corpus for Black Slaves and Indentured Servants, 1784-1787. {Series #33.119}
    • The documents were filed with the Supreme Court, Eastern District, and contain diverse data that vary with each writ. Many of the writs provide the slave's name, place of residency and name of master. In some instances familial relationships are depicted and particulars are entered about where the slave worked and when he or she was purchased. Includes information on slave women and female slave owners.
  • Writs of Inquiry, 1780-1826. {Series #33.120}
    • A writ of inquiry was akin to an actual inquisition, and was issued on behalf of the plaintiff in a case where the defendant had let the proceedings go by default (i.e., refused to confess that the amount claimed in the plaintiff's declaration was correct), and an interlocutory judgment had been given for damages not readily calculable. The plaintiff would begin the process by submitting a praecipe to the court, which would then issue the proper writ of inquiry to the Sheriff of the county where the vendue had been laid, requiring him to enlist twelve inquisitors, and act as judge in a jury trial to assess the damages. Included in these files are writs, inquisitions, wills, copies of bills, land drawings, replications, pleas, narratives, demurrers to evidence and articles of agreement. Information provided includes names of plaintiff, defendant, Sheriff, and inquisitors involved, the nature of the action, the type of property damaged, and amount of damage calculated. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Courts of Oyer and Terminer

  • Court Papers, 1757-1761, 1763, 1765-1766, 1778-1782, 1786-1787. {Series #33.126}
    • These are documents from the Oyer and Terminer Courts of the first nine counties of Pennsylvania. Types of files include case files, judicial administrative papers, and diverse records from the Mayor's Court of Philadelphia; minutes from nisi prius courts of Northampton and York; and liquor license petitions from Philadelphia. Documents in the administrative files include precepts and lists of grand and traverse (petite) jurors, judges, justices of the peace, constables, sheriffs, marshals, and prisoners. The case files are composed of warrants, grand jury inquests and presentments, coroner's inquisitions, recognizances, depositions, examinations, inquisitions, trial minutes, and other papers pertinent to the prosecution of a case (e.g. writs, subpoenas, jury excuses, and search and extradition papers). Cases represented relate to crimes such as misdemeanors, arson, rape, horse stealing, burglary, murder and high treason. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • General Gaol Delivery Dockets, 1778-1828. {Series #33.127}
    • Records of criminal cases heard and adjudged in Allegheny, Bedford, Berks, Bucks, Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Fayette, Franklin, Huntingdon, Lancaster, Luzerne, Lycoming, Montgomery, Northampton, Northumberland, Philadelphia, Washington, Westmoreland, and York Counties. Information provided includes dates of sessions; names of defendant, witnesses, judges, sheriff, grand jurors and petite jurors involved; nature of crime committed (ranging from misdemeanors to high treason, and including crimes related to Blacks); the verdict; and the sentence. The prosecution may have been either the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the United States ("Republica"). Includes documents pertaining to women.

High Court of Errors

  • Minutesand Writs of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, 1780-1808. {Series #33.128}
    • A record of the proceedings of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, designed to be a court of last resort (replacing appeals to the King and Council) between April 6, 1780 and July 2, 1808. Data includes date of session, names of plaintiff (appellant), defendant (appellee), their attorneys, court members present; listings of writs of error and docketed cases, the courts or counties from which the appeal was made, and a listing of cases argued, adjudged and subsequent orders by the court. The High Court of Errors was abolished by an act of the State Legislature in 1806. Also included are claims heard by the Supreme Court from 1778-1779 for goods confiscated under laws of high treason. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Mittimus Papers, 1783-1785, 1788, 1792-1793, 1795, 1798-1799, 1801, 1804. {Series #33.129}
    • Writs affirming the judgments of the Supreme Court as decided by the High Court of Errors and Appeals. Remitted the case back to the Supreme Court for execution of judgment. Information includes names of appellant and appellee; nature of the case; High Court of Errors and Appeals judgment; and date writ was returned to the Supreme Court. Includes documents pertaining to women.


Middle District

  • Allocatur Dockets, 1967-1999. {Series #33.181}
    • Some of the years have a case name index. A listing of cases from the Superior Court that were allowed to petition the Supreme Court for a hearing. Information provided includes the docket number, the title of the case, the county involved, the names of the attorneys for the petitioner and respondents, and the dates of the filings and proceedings. Dockets from more recent years provide the nature of the case and information on the Superior or Commonwealth Court and the Court of Common Pleas. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1961-1986. {Series #33.132}
    • Petitions for allowance of appeal, and answers thereto, filed with the Prothonotary of the Middle District of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Information given by petitions includes Allocatur Docket number; petition number; names of appellant and appellee; name and address of attorney for appellant; date of filing; and a note as to whether petition was granted or denied. Also included is background information on the case including previous courts the case was heard in, and past case terms and numbers assigned; a description of past proceedings and judgments (sometimes including copies of court orders, opinions, other appeals, evidence used, and so on); and a notarized affidavit, signed by the appellant's attorney, attesting to the truth of the above information. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Dockets, Including Lancaster and Chambersburg District Dockets, 1800-1961 {Series #33.140}
    • A record of cases brought before the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in the Middle District. Information provided about each case may include names of parties; a brief description of the case; an explanation regarding its origin; by what means it reached the Supreme Court (by writ of error, certiorari or appeal); where the case was filed; and amounts of court costs incurred. After 1810, the final decision of the court is also noted. The dockets also contain entries giving the location of the court for various sessions, and the names of the justices who presided; as well as notations of adjournment motions, rules adopted concerning payment made to the Court, and other court actions. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • General Correspondence, 1810-1964. {Series #33.141}
    • Correspondence of various Justices and Prothonotaries of the Supreme Court, as well as of publishing companies which had dealings with the Court. Some of the letters relate to the Eastern and Western Districts as well as the Middle. Topics of correspondence include opinion corrections and the miscellaneous dockets. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Judgments Entered and Opinions Filed, 1954-1960. {Series #33.142}
    • Lists of judgments entered and opinions filed in various districts of both the Supreme and Superior Courts of Pennsylvania, compiled for reference purposes. Information given includes names of plaintiff and defendant of each case, as well as the names of dissenting justices; the court term and case number; the court of origin; and the nature of the final decision. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Court Records Including Histories and Rule Book, 1848-1949. {Series #33.145}
    • Miscellaneous grouping of records containing three distinct folders of information. The first group consists of a rule book titled "Rules of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania in and for the Middle District," published by George A. Brooks, Harrisburg, 1858. The second group consists of miscellaneous information which may include the following types of records: certiorari; lists of appeals; orders; summonses; various writs; land surveys; applications for tavern licenses; and correspondence requesting admission an attorney be admitted or restricted from the Pennsylvania Bar. The last group consists of various histories of the Supreme Court. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Opinion Papers, 1810-1965. {Series #33.151}
    • Opinions of the court regarding cases tried, including both concurring and dissenting views. Also filed with the opinions may be writs of certiorari, statements by the defendant-in-error, counter statements, petitions for appeal, docket entries, decisions, arguments of the plaintiff, and paper books containing summaries of the case's main points. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Western District

  • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1971-1979. {Series #33.161}
    • Petitions for allowance of appeal, and answers thereto, filed with the Prothonotary of the Western District of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Information given by petitions includes Allocatur Docket number; petition number; names of appellant and appellee; name and address of attorney for appellant; date of filing; and a note as to whether petition was granted or denied. Also included is background information on the case (including previous courts where heard and past case terms and numbers assigned); a description of past proceedings and judgments (sometimes including copies of court orders, opinions, other appeals, evidence used, and so on); and a notarized affidavit, signed by the appellant's attorney, attesting to the truth of the above information. Information given by the appellees' answers to the petitions includes (the same) Allocatur Docket and petition numbers; names of parties; name and address of attorney for appellee; a brief counter history of the case; arguments for denying the appeal; signature of the attorney; and date of filing. Each petition is either accompanied by an answer or by a letter from the appellee's attorney stating that no answer will be filed. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Allocatur Dockets, 1987-1999. {Series #33.186}
    • Some of the years have a case index. A listing of those cases from the Superior Court where litigants were allowed to petition the Supreme Court for a hearing. The information in the dockets includes docket number, date of docket, the names and addresses of the attorneys involved, and the nature of the case. Information about the Superior Court includes the appellate court name and court number, date of judgment, the names of the judges, and the course of action taken. Information about the Court of Common Pleas includes the name of the trial court and court number, the county of the case, the name of the judge, and the course of action taken. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1892-1980. {Series #33.168}
    • A record of petitions and notices filed with the Supreme Court, Western District, and appearing in the Miscellaneous Dockets. Typical petitions include requests for writs of habeas corpus, mandamus, certiorari, non pros, allocatur and change of venue. Court orders designating Court employee salaries, revising fee schedules, appointing Court officials, amending Court rules, and admitting or disbarring attorneys to the bar of the Court regularly appear, and legal briefs and eulogies for deceased justices are occasionally filed as well. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1892-1966, 1987-1999. {Series #33.169}
    • A record of petitions filed with the Supreme Court, Western District, the majority of which request decrees or writs for leave to appeal from Superior Court, habeas corpus, allocatur, non pros, mandamus, and change of venue. Entries normally list the title of the case; the names and addresses of the attorneys involved; the term, docket number and court where the case originated; and the subsequent Court order. Statements designating Court employee salaries, revising fee schedules, appointing Court officials, amending Court rules, disbarring attorneys, assigning special judicial appointments, eulogizing deceased justices and other prominent persons, and readmitting attorneys in absentia are periodically recorded as well. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Orders-Disbarments, Suspensions, Reinstatements, Amendments to Rules, etc. 1946. {Series #33.188}
    • A listing of cases, orders, or rules brought before the Supreme Court concerning disbarments, suspensions, reinstatements, or amendments. Each entry provides the names of the contesting parties, the case number, the date of the case, a brief explanation of the case, the name and signature of the Chief Justice and Prothonotary, and the date a certified copy of the order was filed. Additional notes and comments are occasionally provided in the text. Note that many of the entries were actually filed with the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, Eastern District. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Papers, 1799-1908. {Series #33.170}
    • The papers contain examples of the various types of materials filed with the Supreme Court, Western District. Included among the papers are writs of fieri facias (1818-1824); certificates concerning Western District cases adjudicated in the Eastern District (1874-1879, 1884, 1890-1891); materials relating to transferred cases (1858-1896); Court orders, rules and appointments (1874-1904); and a variety of records sent by the lower courts to the Supreme Court (ca. 1817-1908). Several indenture agreements from 1799 and 1832 also appear. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Motion Dockets, 1904-1940. {Series #33.171}
    • A record of cases in which the Court was asked to make a ruling on a motion or petition. Entries for each case show the title of the case; the docket case number and court term; a listing of the motions or petitions filed in the case; and the Court's order, for example, whether an appeal was granted or refused. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Record Group 34
Department of Community Affairs

The Department of Community Affairs, the first department of its kind in the nation, was created by Act 582 of 1966. The agency became operational on July 1, 1966, with the purpose of assisting local governments and enabling the State to provide important services necessitated by expanding intergovernmental relationships throughout all levels of public jurisdiction.

Initially, the Department came into being through the bringing together of several related activities which were scattered throughout the state government. Primarily the programs in housing, urban renewal, parks and recreation, planning and economic opportunity came from the Department of Commerce, while community service, research, the information clearing house, technical assistance to local governments, municipal statistics, and legal services came from the Department of Internal Affairs.

Community Affairs was responsible for providing technical and training assistance to local governments, and administering appropriate State and Federal aid programs. The Department directed programs in areas of housing and development, urban renewal, community planning, and recreation and conservation.

In 1996, the Department of Community Affairs was merged with the Department of Commerce to form the Department of Community and Economic Development.

The Governor's Council on Opportunities for the Spanish Speaking was established by Governor Milton J. Shapp in 1973 and placed under the Department of Community Affairs. The Council was continued under the Thornburgh administration, but was renamed the Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community. In 1980, the Council was transferred from the Department of Community Affairs to the Governor's Office. The Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community acts as a liaison between State government and the Hispanic Community to ensure equal opportunity and fair treatment. Functions include developing and coordinating policies and programs affecting Hispanics, encouraging the development of bicultural programs and activities, and acting as an information clearinghouse to Hispanic organizations and individuals.

  • Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community, Subject Files the Executive Director, 1970-1983. {Series #34.11}
    • Subject files which evidence the concerns of the Hispanic Community, including such problems as employment, housing, civil rights, health, education, and migrant labor. Contained in this Series are correspondence to and from state, federal and private organizations; reports; studies; resumes; directories; statistics; and grant proposals. Information on women of color's liberation movement. This series includes programs from the YWCA, a poem entitled "White Women's Liberation Ain't for Me" and essays on the exclusion of women of color from white women's liberation movements.

Record Group 38
Records of the Superior Court

Created in 1895 to relieve the Supreme Court of some of its heavy workload, the Superior Court was made a constitutional court in 1968. An intermediate appellate court with only limited original jurisdiction, the Superior Court hears all appeals from the Courts of Common Pleas which are not exclusively assigned to the Supreme or Commonwealth courts. At present, the Court hears cases in Philadelphia, Harrisburg and Pittsburgh although, through the mid-1960's, it also sat in Scranton.

Eastern District

  • Appeal Papers, 1895-1956. {Series #38.3}
    • Appeals filed with the Eastern District of the Superior Court. Information provided about each case includes name of parties involved; name and county of the lower court from which case was appealed; court term and case number; date appeal was filed; and a sworn statement by the appellant stating that the appeal had not been filed simply to delay case proceedings. Other types of documents filed with the appeals include praecipes for certiorari (court orders for the lower court records to be sent up), transfer documents, assignments of error, and occasionally certified copies of record. Some appeals are also accompanied by petitions for continuance, legal briefs, opinions of the court, paper books, and acknowledgments of record and remittur. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1915-1947. {Series #38.7}
    • Depending on the type of documentation filed for each case, these papers may include briefs, petitions for habeas corpus, acknowledgments of record remittur, and books of record (which contain copies of all actions taken in the course of the case). Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1921-1939. {Series #38.8}
    • Records of various types of cases brought before the Superior Court in the Eastern District. Information provided about each case may include names of appellant and appellee and their attorneys; dates of argument presentations, notices sent, writs issued, and dismissal motions made; record of transferals; and rules and judgments of the court. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Motion Docket Papers, 1916-1917. {Series #38.9}
    • Papers relating to the petitions for motions filed with the Superior Court and documented in the Motion Dockets, 1895-1954 {Series #38.10}. Included are criminal records, petitions for writs of habeas corpus, certificates of rule, court orders, letters supporting and opposing the petitions, and transcripts of court proceedings. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Motion Dockets, 1895-1954. {Series #38.10}
    • A record of petitions submitted for motions, and motions made by the Superior Court. Also documented are petitions for argument and re-argument, agreements to continue a case in a new location, petitions to advance cases for hearing, and orders made by the court. Information provided includes names of parties involved and results of the petition. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Opinions, 1895-1937. {Series #38.11}
    • Statements by Superior Court justices explaining the reasons for the Court's judgment, finding or conclusion in a case (as opposed to a decision, which is the judgment itself). Information normally provided includes court term and case number; names of parties; original court of jurisdiction; argument date; nature of judgment; and name of justice who wrote the opinion. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Middle District

  • Allocatur Dockets, 1937-1948. {Series #38.16}
    • Listing of cases where litigants were allowed to petition the Superior Court for a hearing. Information contained in these dockets includes names of appellant, appellee, and their attorneys; the term and case docket number; filing date of petition; date of acceptance or refusal; and other case information. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • General Correspondence, 1907-1964. {Series #38.22}
    • Correspondence primarily of the Prothonotary of the Superior Court, as well as correspondence from various attorneys to the Superior Court. The correspondence encompasses all the districts of the Superior Court. Topics contained in the correspondence includes status of cases pending; decisions on cases settled; documentation of paperwork transferred between the prothonotaries of various courthouses; and documentation of papers filed by attorneys. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • List of Judgments and Opinions Filed, 1951-1953. {Series #38.25}
    • This Series contains lists of judgments entered and opinions filed in cases in the Superior Court of Pennsylvania. Information provided for each case includes the names of the parties involved; date judgments were entered and opinions filed; the court term and case docket number; and the judgment rendered. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Minute Books, 1895-1965. {Series #38.26}
    • A record of the proceedings of the Middle District of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania. Information contained in the record includes names of justices present; dates of sessions; commencement and adjournment times; the names of persons attending the sessions; case names, term date and docket number of cases discussed; and the Court's subsequent orders or decisions. Topics include the swearing in of new Court members and officials; the admission of attorneys to practice before the Court; a listing of cases argued by counsel; eulogies for deceased justices, and other activities. The Justices issuing the opinions and those dissenting are frequently noted. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1955-1986. {Series #38.27}
    • Papers relating to cases listed in the Miscellaneous Dockets, 1937-1978 {Series #38.28} of the Middle District of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania. Documents filed with the papers include petitions, motions, opinions, indictments, paper books, submissions, and reports. Information provided by the papers includes court term and case number; names of the appellant and appellee; nature of the case; and dates of docketing and filing. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1937-1978. {Series #38.28}
    • Records of the various types of cases brought before the Middle District of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania. Information provided by the entries include names of appellant and appellee; type of case; and proceedings and dates thereof. Recorded in the Miscellaneous Dockets are Amendments to the Rules of the Superior Court; appointments and resignations of staff; and disbarments, readmission, and suspension of attorneys. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Motion Dockets, 1936-1940, 1956-1961. {Series #38.29}
    • Record of motions filed with the Middle District of the Superior Court relating to cases heard or scheduled to be heard before the Court. Information provided includes names of appellant, appellee and their attorneys; type and date of petition or motion filed; date writ was issued; the argument heard of hearing refused; court term and case number; and the original filing date. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Opinions, 1896-1923. {Series #38.30}
    • Statements by Superior Court justices explaining the reasons for the Court's judgment, finding or conclusion in a case (as opposed to a decision, which is the judgment itself). Information normally provided includes court term and case number; names of parties; original court of jurisdiction; argument date; nature of judgment; and name of justice who wrote the opinion. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Scranton District

  • Minute Books, 1896-1938. {Series #38.41}
    • A record of the proceedings of the Scranton District of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania. Information contained in the record includes names of justices present; dates of sessions; commencement and adjournment times; the names of persons attending the sessions; case names, term date and docket number of cases discussed; and the Court's subsequent orders or decisions. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Opinions, 1916-1923. {Series #38.42}
    • Arranged chronologically by court term, and thereunder by case docket number. Statements by Superior Court justices explaining the reasons for the Court's judgment, finding or conclusion in a case (as opposed to a decision, which is the judgment itself). Information normally provided includes court term and case number; names of parties; original court of jurisdiction; argument date; nature of judgment; and name of justice who wrote the opinion. Western District. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Western District

  • Minute Books, 1896-1983. {Series #38.48}
    • A record of the proceedings of the Western District of the Superior Court. Information contained in the Minute Books includes the dates of sessions; commencement and adjournment times; the names of justices present; names of persons attending the sessions; name, term, and docket number of the cases being discussed; and the Court's subsequent decisions. TIncludes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1899-1983. {Series #38.49}
    • Papers relating to cases listed in the Miscellaneous Dockets, 1896-1983 {Series #38.50} of the Western District of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania. Documents filed with the papers include petitions, motions, opinions, indictments, paper books, submissions, and reports. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1896-1983. {Series #38.50}
    • Records of various types of cases brought before the Superior Court in the Western District. Information provided about each case may include names of appellant and appellee and their attorneys; dates of argument presentations, notices sent, writs issued, and dismissal motions made; record of transferals; and rules and judgments of the court. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Record Group 47
Records of the
County Governments

There are 67 counties in Pennsylvania including the consolidated city-county of Philadelphia. Each inhabitant of the state lives in and comes under the jurisdiction of one of them. The largest population is Philadelphia, over one and a half million people; the smallest is Forest, approximately five thousand. The Constitution establishes a basic organization, but counties can adopt their own forms of government. Six counties have adopted home rule charters: Philadelphia, Delaware, Erie, Lackawanna, Lehigh and Northampton.

County Functions

Counties continue to serve in their traditional role as agents of the state for law enforcement, judicial administration and electoral proceedings. The county is also responsible for the property assessment function. Counties become involved in regional planning, solid waste disposal and public health. They perform welfare functions, including mental health. Counties also can establish housing and redevelopment authorities and conduct community development programs. Counties maintain hospitals and homes for the aged. Counties may support local libraries and community colleges.

Legislation enacted in recent years has strengthened the policy making role of boards of county commissioners, granting them greater control of and responsibility for county government. The geographic size of counties enables them to cope with functions that can be better performed on an area wide basis, that is, mass transportation and environmental protection.

County Government

County government, as provided for in the county codes, may be described as a "no-executive" type. The chief governing body is the three member board of county commissioners. But there are also numerous other elected officials independent of the county commissioners. These include the sheriff, district attorney, prothonotary, clerk of courts, register of wills, clerk of the orphans' court, coroner, recorder of deeds and two jury commissioners whose duties are mostly concerned with the work of the county court. Additionally, there are the elective offices of the controller or three auditors and the treasurer who are county finance officers. A public defender is appointed as provided by law. The county commissioners, the elected officers and the county court individually or jointly appoint a number of other county officials and employees needed to carry out county functions by law. Whereas the 11 elected county officials are enumerated in the Pennsylvania Constitution, their powers and duties are prescribed by statutes which are scattered throughout the county codes and general state laws. Consolidation of certain elected offices is provided by state law in the smaller class counties involving the offices of prothonotary, clerk of courts, register of wills, clerk of the orphans' court, and recorder of deeds.

  • Book of Laws, 1913, Allegheny County. {Series #47.200}
    • Copies of laws and ordinances relating to government operations and conduct at all levels of government within the state. Includes laws concerning women.
  • Married Women to Secure their Separate Earnings- Bradford County, March 19, 1873-June 13, 1891. {#47.16}
    • Result of the Act of April 3, 1872 which allowed women to keeps their wages from labor, salary, property, or business separate from their husbands. The dated petitions were submitted to the Court of Common Pleas in Bradford County, Pennsylvania. They record the name, residence, and occupation of the woman; the name of her husband. It also includes an index of women's names.
  • Midwife Register, 1921-1924, Dauphin County. {#47.84}
    • A record of Dauphin County Women who in compliance with the Act of June 5, 1913, registered their certificates to practice as midwives with the prothonotary of the court of common pleas. The affidavits are signed by the midwives and display their names and residences; the dates the certificates were issued by the Bureau of Medical Education and Licensure; and the place in Harrisburg where recorded. Indexed.
  • Midwife Registration Receipt Book, 1921-1924, Dauphin County. {Series #47.85}
    • Original receipts resulting from the registration of midwives registering their services with the county. Data provided includes the number of the receipt, along with the name of the midwife and the date filed. There was a one-dollar fee per midwife to file with the county, as per the Act of June 5, 1913. Each midwife was certified by the Bureau of Medical Evaluation and Licensure of the State of Pennsylvania. The certificate number, volume, and page number of the receipt is also shown, along with the signature of the prothonotary.
  • Divorce, Lunatic and Drunkard Indexes. 1880-1930, Dauphin County. {Series #47.71}
    • Index of people registered with the Prothonotary of Dauphin County as being a "drunkard", "lunatic", or having a "divorce proceeding". Each entry gives the person's name, court term and year, docket number, the classification of the case and individual being labeled as a "drunkard", "lunatic", or "divorce proceeding" candidate.
  • Tax Assessment Rolls, 1900-1960, Dauphin County. {Series #47.34}
    • Assessments and enumerations of property in Dauphin County. Information provided is name of the owner and location; number of seated and unseated lands; number of lots on the property and the acreage; names of the owners of adjoining property; valuation of the land; valuation of the buildings; description of the property; total taxable valuation; amount of tax paid; and any remarks regarding property transfers. Different reports that can be found for the classifications include triennial, female, freeholder, occupational assets, tenants, and numbered streets. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Petitions of Married Women to get their Separate Earnings, 1875-1887, Erie County. {#47.219}
    • Petitions of married women to hold and maintain their earnings outside the control of their husbands. Provision for such control had been established under Public Law 35 section 2 of 1872. The petitions contain the name of the petitioner and her husband.
  • Tax Assessment Books, 1822-1894, Perry County. {Series #47.194}
    • These tax assessment records assume a more condensed format than those of some other municipalities. The books provide assessments and enumerations of all people, property, and things taxable by the laws of the county. Each record gives the freeholder's name and address, the name of residence owner and location, and miscellaneous tax fiscal information. There are various different reports that can be found in this Series: triennial, female, freeholder, occupational assets, tenants, numbered streets. Includes documents pertaining to women.
  • Charters, 1838, 1855-1856, 1860-1861, 1864-1877, 1879-1883, 1887-1901, 1903-1909, 1927, 1938, 1940-1966, Lehigh County {#47.218}
    • Charters granted to non-profit organizations to confirm their name and to legalize their conduct of operations under the terms and clauses of their application. Organizations include churches, fraternal societies, athletic associations, charitable trusts, political organizations, and women's organizations. Amendments to the charters may be found filed with the original charters or they may be filed under the term of court of their filing. Applications to dissolve organizations are filed as well. Where an amendment resulted in a legal dispute, some additional court papers may be found. Charters may contain the name of the organization, its intended purpose, powers granted, a description of the officers, their responsibilities, rules of governance, articles of incorporation, case number, and term of court.
  • Birth Returns and Other Records for Negroes and Mulattos, 1785, 1788-1826, 1830. {Series #47.119}
    • Birth records of "negro" or "mulatto" children filed with the county. Information provided is the date of the child's birth, name of the child, names of the parents, and place of residence. Most of these records were filed with the Clerk of the Peace for Fayette County who also maintained certificates of slave registry. All records were prepared after the passage of the Act of the Gradual Abolition of Slavery in Pennsylvania. The certificates of slave registry, which encompass several counties, contain the registration date, place of residence of the slave owner, gender and age of the slave, and occasionally the slave's date of birth and mother's name. Additional miscellaneous documentation in this series include other materials dealing with slavery or particular slaves in the county.

Record Group 57
Records of the State System of Higher Education
Partially Microfilmed

The State System of Higher Education (SSHE) was created by Act 188 of 1982. It comprises the fourteen publicly owned state universities. Its twenty-member Board of Governors includes the Governor and the Secretary of Education (both ex officio), fourteen others appointed by the Governor with the consent of the Senate (one of whom must be a student), two members of the Senate, and two members of the House of Representatives. The Chancellor, appointed by the Board, is the chief executive officer. The Board establishes broad fiscal, personnel, and educational policies, as well as procedures. SSHE’s mission concerns "the provision of instruction for undergraduate and graduate students to and beyond the master's degree in the liberal arts and sciences, and in the applied fields, including the teaching profession."

An argument made by the Superintendent of Common Schools in 1838, Thomas Burrowes, convinced many that the state's private liberal arts colleges, which had included courses in common school teaching, would never produce enough good teachers. A preponderance of students taking the courses did not go on to obtain teaching careers. The Act of May 20, 1857, set up a procedure for establishing "normal schools" for legally certified, common school teacher training. The state was divided into twelve districts (later made thirteen) in each of which only one school could arise. On petition of thirteen or more citizens who were either contributors (donors) or stockholders, and who had already erected a school that met the act's specifications, the institution would qualify as a state normal school. Certificates of competence in teaching could only be received from one of the schools after two years of actual teaching in the district in addition to successful completion of the two-year curriculum. The act made no appropriation for the schools and implied that they were to be self-supporting. Corporation stock shares were assumed to be the principal means for financing.

A thirteenth normal school district was recognized as Clarion State Normal School in February 1887, but the last of the originally planned twelve districted institutions was Slippery Rock, which was not recognized until February 1889. Cheyney State was the successor to "The Institute for Colored Youth," located in Bristol Township, Philadelphia County, which the state had chartered in 1842. In 1904 this institution was moved to Cheyney, Delaware County, and began functioning as an industrial normal school. By a decree of the Court of Common Pleas of Delaware County, in July 1914, the name was changed to Cheyney Training School for Teachers. On June 24, 1920 it was formally recognized as a state normal school. In 1866, the General Assembly passed the first of many measures to subsidize normal school students. By the end of the nineteenth century, the state funded a student's entire tuition and the student signed an agreement to teach two full years after graduation.

Through the use of such methods, the legislature began pouring large sums into the normal schools, despite its original intention in 1857. Legislators began to feel that the General Assembly needed to be involved in their management. An Act of February 5, 1872 placed two trustees appointed by the Superintendent of Common Schools on the boards of each normal school. In 1873, a $50,000 state appropriation was distributed by a commission made up of the Governor, the Superintendent of Common Schools, and the Attorney General, with a specification that the interests of the state as well as of the schools be considered. Five of the thirteen schools accepted the money which involved giving the state mortgages on the school property. Millersville State Normal School specifically rejected these terms. In 1874, legislation further changed the boards of trustees so that they were in approximate proportion to the amount of money given in by stockholders and by the State. In 1875, another change established each board with eighteen trustees, twelve appointed by the contributors and stockholders and six by the Superintendent. At the same time the fund distributing commission made up of the Governor, Attorney General, and Superintendent, became permanent.

The School Code of 1911 established a method for the state to buy the schools through appropriations to be made in succeeding sessions of the legislature, Once the state acquired ownership, the trustees were to be appointed entirely by the State Board of Education. On July 30, 1913, the state acquired sole ownership of its first normal school, West Chester. In 1922, when Mansfield was purchased, the state finally had ownership of them all. Until 1923, the normal schools were essentially secondary schools. Students were admitted without having previously received a diploma from a four-year high school. As late as 1916 the Superintendent defended this standard of admission by arguing that wherever the high school graduation standard existed the schools became "ladies' schools to a large extent, with the young men going to professional and technical schools which they could enter with the same preparation. The Pennsylvania State Education Association, however, recommended that college credit be given to normal school graduates once they enrolled in accredited colleges.

The state law that set standards qualifying institutions to grant college degrees had been enacted in 1895. In 1923, that law was amended to allow educational institutions owned by the state the power to confer degrees, even though they did not meet the property or legal charter provisions that had been stated in 1895. The power to grant degrees was, however, dependent on the schools having educational standards equivalent to institutions accredited under the 1895 terms. In 1925, the State Council on Education authorized normal schools to confer a bachelor of science degree for particular curriculums as soon as they proved these groups of courses met standards set by the American Association of Teachers Colleges (as modified by the State Council). As a result, ten of the fourteen received degree granting power in 1926, and at the time they awarded their first Bachelor of Science in Education degrees, all changed their names to "State Teachers' College." On May 23, 1932, the last of the fourteen, Cheyney, made this change. By an act of January 8, 1960, all state teachers colleges were reclassified as State Colleges. University status was received in 1982.

These records include information on women in higher education.

  • Bloomsburg University Board of Trustees Minutes, 1927-1967. (microfilm rolls # 5047-5044) {Series #57.1}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Bloomsburg University Catalogs, 1867-1980. (Microfilm rolls # 5228-5239) {Series #57.2}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Bloomsburg University Faculty Government Minutes, 1970-1985. (Microfilm roll 5075) {Series #57.3}
    • Minutes of the University Faculty Government generally provide the date of the meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Bloomsburg University Student Government Council Minutes, 1945-1982. (Microfilm roll 5072-5073) {Series #57.4}
    • Minutes of the Student Government Council generally provide the date of the council meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Bloomsburg University Yearbooks, 1915-1987. (Microfilm roll 5209-5211) {Series #57.5}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • California University of PA Board of Trustee Minutes, 1910-1984. (Microfilm roll 5049-5055) {Series #57.6}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • California University of PA Yearbooks and Yearbook in Review, 1913-1917, 1919-1920, 1929. (Microfilm rolls # 5251-5265, 5418) {Series #57.7}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • California University of PA Catalogs, 1869-1973. (Microfilm rolls # 5240-5249) {Series #57.8}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Cheyney University Catalogs, 1975-1987. (Microfilm roll 5378) {Series #57.9}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Cheyney University, The Record, 1979-1988. (Microfilm roll 5379) {Series #57.10}
    • Student newspaper providing information about campus news, sporting events, and issues of interest to the student body.
  • Cheyney University Yearbooks, 1939-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 4630-4632) {Series #57.11}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • Clarion University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1886-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5064-5078) {Series #57.12}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Clarion University Catalogs, 1889-1957. (Microfilm rolls # 5393-5399) {Series #57.13}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Clarion University College Pathfinder (Student Yearbook), 1975-1987. (Microfilm roll 5382) {Series #57.14}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • Clarion University Faculty Forum Minutes, 1976-1988. (Microfilm roll 5056) {Series #57.15}
    • Minutes of the University Faculty Forum generally provide the date of the forum meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of issues discussed and any business transacted.
  • Clarion University Faculty Senate Minutes, 1960-1982, 1988. (Microfilm roll 5057-5059) {Series #57.16}
    • Minutes of the University Faculty senate generally provide the date of the senate meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Clarion University Graduate Catalogs, 1969-1989. (Microfilm roll 5380) {Series #57.17}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Clarion University Student Senate Minutes, 1942-1988. (Microfilm roll 5060-5063) {Series #57.18}
    • Minutes of the Student Senate generally provide the date of the meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of issues discussed and the business transacted.
  • Clarion University Summer Catalogs, 1958-1978. (Microfilm roll 5381) {Series #57.19}
    • University summer catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Clarion University Yearbooks, 1909-1987. (Microfilm roll 5383-5391) {Series #57.20}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • East Stroudsburg University Catalogs, 1921-1922, 1931-1932, 1939-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5280-5301) {Series #57.21}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • East Stroudsburg University Yearbooks, 1915-1982. (Microfilm rolls # 5266-5279) {Series #57.22}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • Edinboro University Catalogs, 1870-1871, 1896-1898, 1923-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5302-5316) {Series #57.23}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Indiana University of PA Scrapbooks, 1940-1975. (Microfilm rolls # 5400-5416) {Series #57.24}
    • University scrapbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • Kutztown University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1866-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5082-5088) {Series #57.25}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Kutztown University Catalogs, 1866-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5317-5330) {Series #57.26}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Kutztown University Faculty Senate Minutes, 1964-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5089-5104) {Series #57.27}
    • Minutes of the University Faculty Senate generally provide the date of the senate meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Kutztown University Student Government Board Minutes, 1977-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5105-5108) {Series #57.28}
    • Minutes of the Student Government Board generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Kutztown University, The Key-Student Handbooks, 1936-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5348-5354) {Series #57.29}
    • Student handbooks providing orientation information for new and returning students concerning the university, university policies and regulations, student amenities, and class offerings.
  • Kutztown University Yearbooks, 1911-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5331-5347) {Series #57.30}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • Lock Haven University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1914-1984. (Microfilm rolls # 5076-5080) {Series #57.31}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Lock Haven University Bulletins and Catalogs, 1878-1897, 1911-1970. (Microfilm rolls # 5420-5424) {Series #57.32}
    • University bulletins and catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Lock Haven University Yearbooks, 1913-1985. (Microfilm rolls # 5425-5431) {Series #57.33}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • Mansfield University Catalogs, 1864-1865, 1893-1896, 1911-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5372-5377) {Series #57.34}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Mansfield University Faculty Advisory Council Minutes, 1966-1967, 1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5109) {Series #57.35}
    • Minutes of the University Faculty Advisory Council generally provide the date of the advisory council meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Mansfield University Treasurer's Minutes, 1955-1959. (Microfilm rolls # 5081) {Series #57.36}
    • Minutes of the University Treasurer generally provide the date of the meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Mansfield University Yearbooks, 1918-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5357-5371) {Series #57.37}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • Shippensburg University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1929-1982. (Microfilm rolls # 5110-5112) {Series #57.38}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Slippery Rock University Academic Forum Agenda/Minutes, 1966-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5118-5119) {Series #57.39}
    • Minutes of the University Academic Forum generally provide the date of the forum, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Slippery Rock University Alumni News, 1945-1971. (Microfilm rolls # 5446) {Series #57.40}
    • Newsletters providing information about the lives of university alumni including their current employment, and their personal and professional accomplishments.
  • Slippery Rock University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1968-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5113-5117) {Series #57.41}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • Slippery Rock University Catalogs and Bulletins, 1889-1907, 1914-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5432-5439) {Series #57.42}
    • University bulletins and catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • Slippery Rock University, Ginger Hill, 1956-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5447-5448) {Series #57.43}
    • A student literary publication intended to encourage creative writing on campus that was originally begun in 1956 under the title "The Rocket Rider." The publications contains short stories, prose, and poetry submitted by students.
  • Slippery Rock University Yearbooks, 1898-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5440-5445) {Series #57.44}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.
  • West Chester University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1869-1890, 1919-1981. (Microfilm rolls # 5120-5130) {Series #57.45}
    • Minutes of the Board of Trustees generally provide the date of the board meeting, names of those in attendance, and a description of the business transacted.
  • West Chester University Catalogs, 1871-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5470-5486) {Series #57.46}
    • University catalogs providing such types of information as a description of class offerings each semester, the name of the instructor, and the dates and times scheduled.
  • West Chester University School Newspaper, 1924-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5449-5454) {Series #57.47}
    • Student newspaper providing information about campus news, sporting events, and issues of interest to the student body.
  • West Chester University Yearbooks, 1910-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5455-5469) {Series #57.48}
    • University yearbooks providing names and photographs of graduating seniors, descriptions of significant academic and sporting programs, and news about faculty accomplishments.

Manuscript Groups:

Manuscript Group 6
Diaries and Journals Collection

Diaries, travel accounts, memorandum books, weather journals, etc., accessioned as single units, featuring the following women:

  • Lydia Hunn Diary, 1875.
    Includes information on domestic arts, Quakerism, and women's political activism.
  • Nellie Findley Shunk Diary, May 10 - July 4, 1899.
    Records Shunk's trip to Europe with friends.
  • Elizabeth Werst Diary, 1854, 1858, 1865-80:
    Description of various trips and personal information by Elizabeth Werst of Mechanicsburg, Penna.
  • Bertha Wold Diary, Nov. 1918 to Feb. 1919:
    "Impressions of France from Hospital Train 56" Describes experience of an Army Nurse in WWI during a trip by train to collect wounded.

Manuscript Group 7
Military Manuscript Collection

Miscellaneous private papers relating to the French and Indian War, the Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Mexican War, Civil War, Spanish-American War, Philippine Insurrection, World War I, the Pennsylvania National Guard, and peacetime military service. Included are records of individual service, along with related correspondence, and records of militia units and these regiments of Pennsylvania volunteers.

  • Mrs. Paul W. Bartlett to Governor Robert E. Pattison, on the subject of national peace, on behalf of a women's peace, 1886
  • 1917, Apr. 7, Women's Section of the Navy League Certificate
  • 1918-1919, Miss Serface Pass, A.N.C.
  • WWI Nurse Records

Manuscript Group 8
Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous)

Spanning the period from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, these are miscellaneous papers on a large number of legal, political, military, business, medical, educational, social, civic, and religious subjects, including--as a few examples-- materials concerning Democratic, Know-Nothing, Republican and Whig politics; the French and Indian War, Revolutionary War, War of 1812, and Civil War; the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, Pittsburgh and Western Railroad Company, Delaware and Hudson Canal Company, and various forges and furnaces; colonial land policies; slavery; and the Society of Friends. Collection also holds miscellaneous papers of several Pennsylvania families.

  • Adams, Abigail.
    • Letter dated March 13, 1780.
  • Allen, Elizabeth.
    • Letter dated January 14, 1918.
  • Anonymous.
    • Draft of a letter, discussing feminine clothes and manners.
  • Davis, Eliza.
    • Letter dated March 28, 1812.
  • Davis, Hannah G.
    • Letter dated July 14, 1851.
  • Fuller, Gertrude.
    • Correspondence, speeches, and misc. items dated 1928-1936.
  • Gearhart Family Letters.
    • Letters written by Elizabeth F. Brown in California during the Gold Rush to relatives in Pennsylvania. Dated 1858-59.
  • Gilson, Mrs. C. J.
    • Teachers' Provincial Certificate, No. 96, Crawford Co., Pa., 1861.
  • Growden, Ann.
    • Legal papers of Ann Growden, widow of Joseph Growden, 1735.
  • Grove, Mrs. Clement F.
    • Collection. Letter, deeds and misc. items dated 1787-1839.
  • Harrisburg Bible Society.
    • Minute Book, Jan. 20, 1866-May 26, 1881.
  • Maid Social League
  • Oakley, Violet.
    • Papers, ca. 1955-1961
  • Remedy Books
  • Testimony by Friends
    • Haverford Monthly Meeting.
  • Various Circulars
  • “Who Will Care for Mother Now?”
    • Song by Charles Carroll Sawyer and C. F. Thompson, no date.
  • “Kind Friends are Near Her: Answer to Who Will Care for Mother Now?”
    • Words by E. Rossiter and music by F. Walters
  • “Mother: Is the Battle Over?”
    • Song lyrics published by A.W. Auner

Manuscript Group 9
Pennsylvania Writers Collection

Notes, manuscripts, and related materials pertaining to certain of the works of these Pennsylvania authors, composers, and poets.

  • Deland, Margaret
  • Dolson, Hildegarde
  • Foster, Stephen Collin
  • Hill, Grace Livingston
  • Long, Amelia Reynolds
  • Martin, Helen R.
  • Mayo, Katherine
  • McCloskey, Eunice Loncoske
  • Miller, Lois
  • Rinehart, Mary Roberts
  • Singmaster, Elsie
  • Tarbell, Ida
  • Vivan, Cassandra
  • White, Neila Gardner
  • Widdemer, Margaret

Manuscript Group 43
Dock Family Papers

These are primarily the papers of Mira Lloyd Dock (1853-1945), who was a prominent figure in promoting forest conservation, founding the Pennsylvania State Forest School and tirelessly advocating for the beautification of Harrisburg. She was the first woman appointed to the State Forestry Reservation Commission, serving from 1901 to 1913. Much of her correspondence relates to the American Forestry Association, the Pennsylvania Department of Forestry, the Pennsylvania Forestry Association, the State Forestry Academy at Mt. Alto, the Women's School of Horticulture at Ambler, the State Federation of Pennsylvania Women, and the General Federation of Women's Clubs. Major Correspondents include Mary Colston, Robert S. Conklin, A. Boyd Hamilton, Florence Keen, J. Horace McFarland, Warren H. Manning, Frederick Law Olmsted, Marlin E. Olmsted, Gifford Pinchot, William H. Rau, Joseph T. Rothrock, and Miss F. R. Wilkinson. Related items include State Forestry Reservation Commission minutes, 1913; reports and speeches, 1902-13; school notebooks; and professional and personal diaries, 1869-1918, (32 volumes). There are a large number of photographs, ca. 1880-ca. 1940, including images of various Dock family members, Joseph T. Rothrock, and Pennsylvania Governor William A. Stone; trees and forest reserves throughout Pennsylvania; and urban scenes including Coudersport, Harrisburg, Johnstown, and Philadelphia.

Also present are views of churches, commercial and public buildings, and scenes relating her travels. Also present are extensive materials relating to Mira Dock's grandfather, William Dock (1793-1868), and father, Gilliard Dock (1827-1895); her uncle George Dock (1823-187?) who was a physician and professor of medicine at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia; and Mira's younger brother George Dock (1860-1951), also a physician and teacher of medicine. The papers of Gilliard Dock contain travel notes covering trips to Florida, Georgia, Minnesota, Missouri, the Rocky Mountains, 1845-1894; comments on the depressions of the 1850s, 1870s, and 1890s; and observations concerning Gilliard's career as a machinist and as a mine superintendent, 1849-1880. The latter papers shed considerable light on Gilliard's experiences as a partner in the firm of Hickok and Dock, a general machine business operating in Harrisburg in the early 1850s; as the operator of a machine shop business at Hopewell from 1856-61; as a private in the Civil War, 1862; and as the superintendent of coal mines at Lorberry, 1863-66, Lykens, 1866-70, and Shamokin, 1871-73. Relating to the last of these positions, when Gilliard was an employee of the Pennsylvania Railroad, there is a letter press book, 1871-72, with copies of letters directed to W. B. Fowle, general manager of the Shamokin operation.

  • Mira Dock Papers, 1878-1947
  • Prints and Postcards, 1889-1948, [undated]
    • Young Woman's Creek Forest Reservation
  • Miscellaneous
    • Information on the International Women's Council, Pennsylvania Federation of Women's Clubs.

Manuscript Group 46
Ephrata Cloister Collection, 1723-1951

Manuscripts (mostly in German) pertaining to Ephrata Cloister, a celibate religious community of the German Seventh Day Baptists founded ca. 1725 by Georg Conrad Beissel (b. 1690, d. 1768). The collection includes papers on theology, astrology and medicine by Jacob Martin (b. 1725, d. 1790), miscellaneous remedies and magical charms, a 1767 letter from Brother Ezechiel Sangmeister to Conrad Beissel condemning Beissel's alleged "tyranny and drunkenness," and correspondence of Jacob Martin that includes an exchange with Jacob Sensenig, 1760 and undated. Also present are miscellaneous items and printed pieces including a woodcut contrasting Gutenberg's 1440 press with the modern press of 1723, an illuminated calendar and cloister hymn possibly written by Conrad Beissel, an intricate illustrated monograph by Beissel, a pamphlet, entitled Act of Incorporation of Seventh Day Baptists printed in 1860, and a broadside printed on the old Ephrata press during its exhibition at the Sesqueicentennial of the Franklin Institute in 1874.

  • Astrological, Alchemical, and Theosophical Materials.
  • Literary and Devotional Materials
  • Folklore, Medicine, and Magic

Manuscript Group 67
Harris Family Papers

Microfilmed

Chiefly papers of James Harris (b. 1755, d. 1825) and James Dunlop Harris (b. 1797, 1842). The former, a deputy surveyor and member of the Pennsylvania Senate from 1800 to 1808, was, with his father-in-law, Colonel James Dunlop, the co-founder in 1795 of the town of Bellefonte, Centre County. The latter was a principal engineer on first the Western Division, next upon the West Branch Division, and finally upon North Branch Division of the Pennsylvania Canal. Included are a few items pertaining to the parents of James Harris: John Harris (b. 1723, d. 1794) and his wife Jane. John Harris was an early settler on the Swatara in Lancaster (now Dauphin) County, and founder in 1790 of Mifflintown on the Juniata. Probably the most striking item in the group is an inventory of the estate of Jane Harris (d. 1807) which includes a list of books which had belonged to her husband. This list shows a theological and historical library of very considerable dimensions and quality for a pioneer family in eighteenth-century Pennsylvania.

The papers of James Harris contain correspondence with William Bell, John Blair, John Mitchell, and others, 1802-26; a plan of Mifflintown (1790), 1814; deeds for lots in Bellefonte, 1807, 1809; agreements between James Harris and others, 1803, 1813, 1826; notebook, journal, notes, etc., regarding various surveying expeditions, 1784; notifications of Harris' appointment, 1787, to lay out a highway from Frankstown on the Juniata to the mouth of Loyalhanna Creek on the Conemaugh; field notes, 1787, relating to the Frankstown to Conemaugh road; book of acreages, with journal of surveys, 1786-87, on the Conemaugh, the Sinnemahoning, and other streams; field notes on surveys, 1792-1806; receipt book of William Harris and James Harris, 1803-13 and day book for the estates of John Harris and William Harris, 1800-26.

Revealing professional, political, and personal involvements during James D. Harris' employment as principal engineer on the Western Division, 1827-29, West Branch Division, 1931-34, and North Branch Division, 1836-38, of the Pennsylvania Canal, the papers of James Dunlop Harris embrace considerable correspondence with canal commissioners, superintendents, engineers, contractors, and such prominent individuals as Joseph Mcllvaine, William C. McPherson, John Mitchell, William Fisher Packer, E. F. Pennypacker, Francis R. Shunk, Joseph Smith, Thaddeus Stevens, and Josiah White. Included are such interesting items as a letter to John Mitchell, 1833, describing a riot between canal laborers and boatmen, and an account William F. Packer for the expenses of troops led by Captain S. H. Wilson to quell the disturbance.

There is correspondence, 1833-34, with James and Simon Cameron relating mainly to Harris' taking an engineer's position on the Portsmouth and Lancaster Railroad; correspondence, 1835, with Thomas Burnside of the Bald Eagle and Spring Creek Navigation Company and Abner Lacock, president of the Pennsylvania-Ohio ("Cross Cut") Canal; correspondence, 1835-36, during Harris' employment as principal engineer on the Pennsylvania-Ohio Canal; and correspondence, 1831-41, with William Foster, Jr., Harris' assistant, friend, and successor in canal appointments. Related items include a longhand copy by Harris of his report on the survey of the Columbia Philadelphia Railroad, 1838; notes by James M. Nesbit on two surveys done in 1837 along Penn's Creek, one for a railroad, one for a canal, both under directions of James D. Harris; a copy of Harris' report on the Union Canal, relative to the enlargement of that waterway, 1839; statements on canal techniques and canal problems; and various plans and drawings for canal features.

  • Petition of Isabella Crozier, 1794-1812

Manuscript Group 73
Liliane Stevens Howard Collection

Reflecting Liliane Stevens Howard's efforts in support of the Philadelphia County Woman Suffrage Society, in support of the woman suffrage movement in Pennsylvania, and, in general, on behalf of women's rights, this collection contains correspondence with the Pennsylvania Council of Republican Women, 1958, the Pennsylvania Woman Suffrage Association, 1915, the National Woman's Party, 1943, 1956, and the New York State Woman Suffrage Party, 1916; reports on conferences, e.g., the International Woman Suffrage Conference, Berlin, 1904, and the Women's Centennial Congress, New York City, 1940; an account by Liliane Howard on the history, 1904-42, of the Philadelphia County Woman Suffrage Society; Women's Suffrage Party of PA Declaration of Principles, North Boroughs Council of Republican Women, Allegheny County Equal Rights Association, scrapbooks of news clippings, 1945-59, 3 vols.; and biographical accounts prepared by Liliane Howard on Ladson Hall, Liliane Stevens Howard, Harriet Annie Lucas, M. Estelle Russel, Suzanne Silvercruys, Mrs. Henry Hall Sinnamon, and Dr. Mary Edwards Walker.

  • Reports of Liliane Howard to State Chairman
  • General Correspondence
    • including Alice Paul and various PA suffragists
  • Biographical Material
  • Books and Pamphlets
    • including NAWSA's Suffrage History
  • Equal Rights Amendment, 1943,1956
  • Police Woman's Unit Annual Report, 1945
  • Scrapbooks of News Clippings
  • History of Philadelphia County Woman Suffrage Society
  • Information on the "Keystone Eight."

Manuscript Group 84
McCreath Family Collection
Microfilmed

Mostly papers of Margaretha Flemming McCreath, Harrisburg, including examples of report books of the Female Seminary, Harrisburg, attended by Margaretha Flemming; drafts of essays read before the Franklin Debating Society, Harrisburg, and a copy of the "Fourth Annual Report of the Board of Managers of the Young Men's & Young Ladies' Total Abstinence Society of Harrisburg," 1841. The organization promoted, "abstinence form all that can intoxicate."

  • Essays
    • Temperance
  • Miscellaneous Papers
    • Young Men's & Young Ladies' Total Abstinence Society of Harrisburg, 1841
    • Female Seminary

Manuscript Group 90
John R. Miller Collection

Microfilmed

Records of Cumberland County officials, including election returns, 1808-1912; lists of voters, 1808-89; oaths of office, 1784-1914; assessor's oaths, 1768-1882; licenses applied for and granted, 1850-55; letters and papers pertaining to bridges, 1812-43; miscellaneous papers relating to bonds, estates, and tavern licenses, 1769-1837; returns made by owners of slaves, 1780; court proceedings, 1780-1875; lists of juries, grand and traverse, 1806-56; papers relating to the education of paupers, bills and receipts, 1807-36; tax returns, 1770-1843; tax duplicates, 1783-98, 1801-17; county commissioner's receipts, 1780-1887; bounty receipts, foxes and wolves, 1774-1844; viewers of roads receipts, 1804-25; treasurer's receipts, 1807-49; and military records, 1845-46.

  • Negro Slaves Name & Age Returns, 1780, 1791, 1828

Manuscript Group 93
Moore Family Papers
Microfilmed

Family correspondence, 1807-82, legal papers, 1749-1887, and miscellaneous items, 1800-1934, concerning primarily the following members of the Moore and Parker families of Carlisle: James Moore, Johnston Moore, Mrs. Mary Parker Moore, Park J. Moore, William Moore, Isaac B. Parker, Mary V. Parker, and William B. Parker. Included is a letter, 1863, from Mrs. Mary Parker Moore to her father, Isaac B. Parker, explaining depredations in Carlisle by Confederate soldiers during the Civil War.

  • Correspondence
    • Letters from Mary V. Parker concerning her schooling and the affects of the war.

Manuscript Group 98
Orbison Family Papers
Microfilmed

For the most part, these are papers of William Orbison (b. 1777 d. 1857), Huntingdon lawyer, founder of Orbisonia, president of the Huntingdon Bank and also of the Huntingdon Academy; of Ellen Matilda Orbison Harris (b. 1816 d. 1902), daughter of William Orbison, wife of Dr. John Harris (d. 1881), and secretary of the Philadelphia Ladies' Aid Society, an organization devoted to the relief of soldiers during the Civil War; and of William A. Thompson (d. ca. 1805), Huntingdon attorney, associated with William Orbison. Dr. John Harris, son of James Harris and grandson of James Dunlop, co-founders of Bellefonte, served as U. S. consul at Venice, Italy, 1870-81.

  • Orbison Family Correspondence
    • Letters regarding a female slave
  • Papers of Ellen Matilda Orbison Harris, Philadelphia Ladies Aid Society, 1816-1902.
    • Includes information on the Philadelphia Ladies Aid Society. Such papers consist of organizational papers, secretary's reports, treasurer's accounts, etc.; correspondence of Mrs. Margaret Bonsell, Dorothea Dix, and Mrs. Joel Jones; statement of Mrs. Harris regarding the society's work for presentation to General George B. McClellan; letters received from surgeons; letters from soldiers; letters of Mrs. Harris to her husband, many written from the battle fronts; letters of Dr. Harris to his wife; printed circulars, etc.

Manuscript Group 100
Pennsylvania Association of Women Deans

President's notebook, 1922-38; minutes and reports, 1929, 1936-70; bulletins, 1938-50, 1964-70; handbooks, 1929-58, 1969; newsletters, 1971-72; programs of annual meetings, 1939-66; golden anniversary program, 1970; membership and registration lists, 1938-49.

  • Pennsylvania Association of Women Deans & Counselors Papers
  • Miscellaneous Papers
    • Information pertaining to Title IX, Affirmative Action, women's liberation, women's education, the Equity Act, and the Equal Right Amendment is also included.

Manuscript Group 101
Pennsylvania State Temperance Union Papers
Microfilmed
 

Record book, including constitution and minutes, 1867-70, and printed proceedings and circulars, 1871-74.

  • Miscellaneous Papers, 1871-74.
  • Record -Book, 1867-70

Manuscript Group 123
Mrs. Elisha D. Swift Papers

Microfilmed

Mostly incoming and outgoing correspondence of the wife of the Reverend Elisha D. Swift pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Allegheny, 1835-64, regarding primarily the state of religion and the progress of missionary activity.

  • Correspondence
    • Pertaining to women's influence within religion.

Manuscript Group 133
Welles Family Collection
Microfilmed

Correspondence, accounts, etc. of the family of Charles F. Welles (b. 1789, d.1866) who was a prominent resident of Wyalusing, Bradford County.

Personal correspondence, 1805-1898, between Charles F. Welles and his wife, Ellen J. Welles, their several sons and daughters, and others. In addition to family affairs, include fishing voyages by two of the sons along the New England and Nova Scotia coasts; student life at Princeton and at Vassar College; a visit to England by Henry H. Welles, 1854; and business enterprises, including shipping, lumbering, gristmill operations, farming, and canal and bridge construction, in which the Welleses were engaged. Separated from the main body of personal correspondence are several printed items of interest, including an 1845 circular from the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, requesting information on local history and records, and two 1867 items describing the new Lincoln University at Oxford, Chester County.

Business correspondence of Charles F. Welles and his son, George H. Welles, 1818-88, dealing particularly with the acquisition and sale of land, court cases involving land, and the use of timber. Correspondence touches also on farm management, gristmill operations, and the progress in the 1850s of the North Branch Canal and the Wyalusing Bridge Company. Among the writers are Mathias and G.M. Hollenback of Wilkes-Barre and Benjamin R. Morgan of Philadelphia, as well as Sir Gerald Aylmer of Donodea Castle in Ireland, who wrote in 1850-51 concerning the immigration from the country under Charles F. Welles' sponsorship of a workman for the North Branch Canal.

Accounts, legal papers, etc. 1806-67, mainly of Mathias Hollenback and Charles F. Welles and including receipts, promissory notes, deed, leases, statements of court judgments, and invoices. Many of the papers relate to farming operations between 1838 and 1855 on land held by Welles in Towanda and Wyalusing.

  • Personal correspondence, 1805-1894.
    • Letters from their daughter at Vassar College.

Manuscript Group 143
Sarah R. Meseroll Collection

This collection holds papers relating to the Preston family, chiefly of Buckingham and Plumstead townships, Bucks County, with a branch located at Stockport, Wayne County. Family members represented include Paul Preston (b. 1724, d. 1806), Bucks County surveyor, tax collector, court translator of German, and clerk for many years of Buckingham Monthly Meeting of Friends; his sons, Samuel (b. 1756, d. 1834), Paul (b. 1767, d. 1853), and Silas (b. 1769, d. 1855), the first of whom was a pioneer settler of Wayne County and that county's associate judge; Joseph Preston and his uncle, Thomas Stradling; Nathan Preston; and Mary Preston and her husband, John M. South, who became supervisor of the Delaware and Raritan Canal in 1879. A large part of the collection connects to Mary Preston, whose interests in suffrage, female education, and Quakerism are well-represented and whose correspondence makes up a substantial part of {series 143m.1}. Striking aspects of the Mary Preston's correspondence includes discourse on women's rights and mentions of other issues that were important to Mary Preston and the friends with whom she corresponded.

The collection includes correspondence; legal papers, among which are deeds, bonds, estate papers, copies of wills, and Friends marriage certificates; invoices and receipts; essays and poetry; lecture notes, school class rolls, and copy books; a translation by the elder Paul Preston, apparently from the German, of an epistle by Christopher Shets; and genealogical notes. The material principally concerns personal and family affairs; political matters; railroad and canal construction; the general subjects of education and women's rights, as well as the schooling and the teaching careers of Mary Preston and others; the Religious Society of Friends (the Hicksite branch after 1827), particularly Buckingham Monthly Meeting; and the histories of the Preston and related families. Also in the collection is a quantity of printed material covering the period 1801-1939, including general newspapers from several cities; religious, educational, literary, and anti-slavery newspapers and magazines; almanacs; and a wide range of newspaper clippings related to Preston family history.

The relationship of Sarah R. Meseroll, from whose estate this collection was donated, to the Preston family is unclear. The material was donated in 1964 and there is little documentation in the collection as to the relation of Sarah R. Meseroll to the Prestons.

  • Correspondence, 1851-1896.
  • Publications
    • The Illustrated Family Christian Almanac, 1851.
    • Farmer's Almanac and Housekeeper's Receipt Book, 1852.
    • American Phrenological Journal, December 1852.
    • Clark's School Visitor, various issues.
    • The Pennsylvania School Journal, April 1859.
    • Life Illustrated, May 14th, 1859.
    • The Teacher's Journal, May 1859.
    • The Educator and Teacher's Journal, July 4th, 1862.
    • Harper's Weekly, December 3rd, 1864.
    • Christian Advocate and Journal, May 11th, 1865.
    • Banner of Light, various issues.
    • Godey's Lady's Book, October 1867.
    • Banner of Light, June 6th, 1868.
    • National Anti-Slavery Standard, December 18th, 1869.
    • Scattered Seeds, December 1870.
    • Beecher, Henry Ward. Woman's Influence in Politics, 1871.
    • The Journal [Quaker periodical], various issues.
  • Miscellaneous Papers
    • Essays about women's rights, abolition, and education, poetry book, lecture notes, Preston's gradebook, Quaker history, and materials relating to Mary Preston's time at Millersville Normal School.

Manuscript Group 150
Henry C. Corbit Collection
Microfilmed

Outgoing family correspondence, 49 items, of Henry C. Corbit, Philadelphia city legislator, member of the Society of Friends, and noted traveler, who was personally acquainted with a number of well-known abolitionists and advocates of woman suffrage. Collection consists of letters from Corbit to his wife, Sarah, written during travels through western Pennsylvania and New York state, 1835; letters to his mother, Elizabeth Corbit, and one letter to his brother, Joseph, written during a trip through England and several European countries, 1839-40; and letters to his wife and one to his daughter, Emma, describing a trip to England and France, 1843.

Subjects discussed include the modes of transportation used, other travelers, scenery along the way, towns and cities visited, and impressions of the English and French. In an 1843 letter, Corbit compared England unfavorably with the United States and remarked upon England's "unholy war upon the Chinese for pelf and upon the poor nations of India for Territory." Notable in the correspondence are references, some rather casually made, to personal encounters with individuals who were or would become well-known, including Lucretia Mott, whom Corbit met at a Friends Yearly Meeting in New York state in 1835 and, again, in London in 1840. Two other persons referred to were with Corbit on the steamer Britannia on the way to Europe in 1843; these were Horace Mann, "a tall old fashioned white headed man of about sixty!" and Julia Ward Howe, "a round full unintellectual faced dame of about thirty... said to possess abundance of solid charms."

  • Travel Correspondence, 1835-43.
    • Includes impressions of abolitionists/suffragists Julia Ward Howe and Lucretia Mott.

Manuscript Group 156
Edward Martin Papers

Papers of Edward Martin (b. 1879, d. 1967), Waynesburg lawyer; state auditor general, 1925-29; state treasurer, 1929-33; adjutant general, 1939-43; governor, 1943-47; and U. S. senator, 1947-58. A member of the Pennsylvania National Guard from 1898, Martin saw action in the Philippine Campaign, 1898-99; Mexican Border Campaign, 1916; and World War I, 1917-19. He was named brigadier general in 1922, promoted to major general in 1939, took command of the 28th Division, Pennsylvania National Guard in 1939, and was inducted into federal service as commanding general, 28th Division, U. S. Army, 1941.

  • General Correspondence, 1943-1946
    • Correspondence from women's organizations including Women Against Communism and the Pennsylvania Council of Republican Women
  • Photographs
    • Including photos of the WAVES and WACS

Manuscript Group 171
Samuel W. Pennypacker Papers
Microfilmed

Governor's papers and private papers of Samuel Whitaker Pennypacker (b. 1843, d. 1916) who served as governor of Pennsylvania 1903-1907. A prominent Philadelphia lawyer, judge, and president of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania from 1900 to 1916, Pennypacker authored more than fifty books and publications including Settlement of Germantown and The Autobiography of a Pennsylvanian. Born in Phoenixville, Chester County, on April 9, 1843, he was descended from Hendrick Pannybakker, a Dutch émigré who was a surveyor for William Penn. His grandfather, Mathias Pennypacker, served as a member of the General Assembly and president of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad. He helped write the state Constitution of 1837. His father, Isaac Pennypacker, was the first burgess of Phoenixville and held a professorship at the Philadelphia Medical College. His mother, Anna Marie Whitaker, came from a family that owned a local ironworks.

In 1862, Pennypacker taught in a one-room schoolhouse in Mont Clare, Montgomery County and in 1863 he enlisted in Company F of Pottstown, 26th Pennsylvania Emergency Regiment during General E. Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania. In 1865 he earned his bachelor of laws degree at the University of Pennsylvania and established his own law practice. In 1866 he was elected president of the Bancroft Literary Union and in 1868 was chosen president of the Law Academy of Philadelphia. In 1886 he was appointed to the Philadelphia Board of Education, admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of the United States in 1887 and in 1889 Governor Beaver appointed him judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia. He became president judge in 1897 and was reelected in 1899. During his presidency of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania from 1900 he wrote prolifically on early local and state history, English common law, the Supreme Court, genealogical topics, and did several biographies. He also amassed more than ten thousand volumes in his personal library and self-mastered Latin, French, Greek, Italian, and Dutch. His polished intellect, public experience, and relation to U. S. Senator Matthew Quay, made him one of the most powerful Republicans in Pennsylvania.

In 1902, Pennypacker defeated John P. Elkin, the Republican state attorney general, for the gubernatorial nomination. The Quay and Boies Penrose political machine were accused of buying votes from Elkin supporters, which they denied. In the general election, Robert Pattison, the only Democrat to serve as governor between the Civil War and 1935, sought a third non-successive term after having served 1883-1887 and 1891-1895. Pennypacker, however, picked up the endorsements of veterans, agricultural interests, the popular former governor and Civil War hero James Beaver, and President Theodore Roosevelt, who publicly proclaimed that Pennypacker's defeat would be a "national calamity."

  • Legal Papers, 1771, 1872, 1883, 1888 - 1903, 1909 - 1916
    • Notes and Opinions, 1895 - 1902 Application of Right Worthy Grand Court of Ladies, Protestant Association, 1898.

Manuscript Group 184
Reading Labor Advocate Records
Microfilmed

Records of the Reading Labor Advocate, official organ of the Socialist Party of Berks County and of the Federated Trades Council of Reading, includes the following: minutes of the Executive Committee of the Socialist Party of Pennsylvania, 1932-34, 1936-37; reports of the Socialist Party of Pennsylvania, 1932, featuring a report of the executive secretary and a report on organizational work in the anthracite region; correspondence, 1919-46, representing such figures as George W. Hartman, Daniel W. Hoan, Jesse Holmes, Sarah Limbach, Jasper McLevy, James Oneal, Clarence Senior, and Norman Thomas; legal papers, 1917-38, 1951; photographs, n. d.; and accounts, 1918-58.

  • General Correspondence, 1919-21, 24, 1926-29, 1931-38, 1944-46, n. d.
    • Correspondence of Sarah Limbach, Executive Secretary of the Socialist Party of Pennsylvania.
  • Minutes
  • Reports, 1932

Manuscript Group 185
Harmony Society Papers
Microfilmed

The Harmony Society was founded in 1805 by Johann Georg Rapp. (1757-1847), a farmer and vinedresser born in Iptigen, Germany. Rapp and his followers believed in refashioning their lives around their vision of early Christian communalism during the first centuries of the Christian era. They established their first community, Harmony, in the Connoquenessing Valley of Butler County in 1805. There, all property was held in common, and in 1807, the group adopted the practice of celibacy. A small cloth factory was established in 1806, to be followed by a sawmill, tannery, distillery, vineyards, and a two-story hotel.

In 1814, the Society sold the property in Butler County and founded New Harmony in Posey County, Indiana. There, they erected even larger factories. In 1824, the members returned to western Pennsylvania and established the village of Economy in Beaver County. Rapp died in Economy in 1847. Under the trusteeship of Romelius L. Baker. (1847-1868) and Jacob Henrici. (1868-1892), the Society became involved in real estate speculation in Beaver Falls, construction of the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad, established the Economy Savings Institution and Economy Brick Works, and operated the Economy Oil Company, Economy Planing Mill, and Economy Lumber Company. Following litigation by heirs, the Harmony Society _ dissolved in 1905 and seventeen structures comprising Old Economy Village were acquired by the Pennsylvania Historical Commission in 1919 for use as a historic site. Most of the archival records thereafter came into the possession of John S. Duss and Susanna C. Duss, the last trustees and were employed by John Duss to write The Harmonists: A Personal History. (1943). The Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania took custody of part of the records in 1931 and 1933 and the balance were sold to the Pennsylvania Historical Commission in 1937. This manuscript group has been transferred to the PHMC's Old Economy Village Historic Site, but microfilm copies of most of the materials can be viewed at the Pennsylvania State Archives. Includes documents pertaining to women.

Manuscript Group 190
James H. Duff Papers

A native of Mansfield (now Carnegie), Allegheny County, James H. Duff (b. 1883, d. 1969) graduated from the University of Pittsburgh Law School, 1907. A delegate to the National conventions of the Republican Party, 1932, 1936, 1940, and 1948, he was Pennsylvania's attorney general, 1943-47; the Commonwealth's governor, 1947-51; and U. S. senator from Pennsylvania, 1951-57.

  • General Correspondence, 1947-51
    • Correspondence from Pennsylvania Council of Republican Women, Allegheny County Council of Republican Women, Pennsylvania Federation of Negro Women, League of Women Voters, and Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania.

Manuscript Group 200
Poster Collection

Nearly 500 posters, most relating to political issues, e.g., campaigns and elections, or to Civil War, World War I, or World War II matters.

  • Posters
    • Includes YWCA, Women's War Effort, Red Cross and WACS.

Manuscript Group 201
Gertrude Howard Nauman Collection

The papers include political, civic, and personal papers of Gertrude Howard Nauman (b. 1901, d. 1973), daughter of Marlin E. Olmsted, stepdaughter of Vance C. McCormick, and for many years a leading figure in Republican Party politics. Also found are the political and personal papers of Marlin E. Olmsted (b. 1847, d. 1913), a Republican member in the U. S. House of Representatives, 1897-1912; and civic and personal papers of Gertrude Howard Olmsted McCormick (b. 1874, d. 1953), a national vice-president of the Girl Scouts of America, and one of the organizers of the Harrisburg Symphony and the Harrisburg Art Association.

Gertrude Nauman, wife of Spencer G. Nauman (of the law firm established in Harrisburg in 1871 by Simon Cameron's son-in-law, Wayne MacVeagh), was much involved in election campaigns for Dwight D. Eisenhower, Richard M. Nixon, Hugh Scott and other notable Republicans. A Distinguished Daughter of Pennsylvania, a member of the State Art Commission, and a member of the National Advisory Council of the Girl Scouts of America, she was a prominent Harrisburg civic leader, a founder of the Harrisburg Area Community College, a member of the Mayor's Advisory Council, and an elected member of the Harrisburg Charter Commission.

The general correspondence of Gertrude Howard Nauman, 1780-1972, contains personal, political and civic correspondence, including miscellaneous reports, programs, and campaign materials. Included in the correspondence are materials pertaining to Citizens for Eisenhower-Nixon, 1952, 1956-57; Citizens for Scott-McGonigle, 1957-58; Distinguished Daughters of Pennsylvania, 1961-65; Harrisburg Charter Commission, 1968; Harrisburg Hospital, 1969; Eisenhower Home Committee, Eisenhower Foundation, 955-56; President Eisenhower's Birthday Party, Atlantic City, 1953; Republican National Committee, 1953-58; Republican national conventions, 1952, 1960; Youth for Eisenhower-Nixon, 1957; and similar organizations, institutions, and events. There are also personal letters with correspondents such as George I. Bloom, James H. Duff, Milton Eisenhower, John S. Fine, Edward Martin, Mrs. Edward Martin, Richard M. Nixon, Herman T. Schneebeli, Hugh Scott, William W. Scranton, Raymond P. Shafer, M. Harvey Taylor, and LeRoy S. Zimmerman. The personal correspondence includes genealogical materials and miscellaneous items relating to the Howard and Olmsted families.

Within the general correspondence series you will find papers of Marlin E. Olmsted, 1856-1913. They consist of miscellaneous political papers and personal correspondence such as invitations, addresses and a travel diary. The correspondents include Joseph G. Cannon, Daniel H. Hastings, and Gertrude Howard Olmsted (Marlin's wife).

The correspondence of Gertrude Olmsted McCormick, 1899-1937, also found within the general correspondence series, is composed of family letters and writings concerning the Civic Club of Harrisburg, the Colonial Dames of America, the Girl Scouts of America, etc. Featured correspondents include several famous people such as: Mrs. Herbert C. Hoover, J. Horace McFarland, John J. Pershing, Mrs. Gifford Pinchot, Mrs. F. D. Roosevelt, and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller.

The card files show how far-reaching Gertrude Nauman's political contacts were. There are cards for Citizens for Eisenhower, Women's Division, District and County Chairmen, and various Counties.

The photograph series highlights family and political subjects. In the political category can be found shots of Richard Nixon and one of Herbert Hoover and his wife.

The sheet music showcases a wide variety of music styles such as Classical, Jazz and show tunes.

  • General Correspondence, 1780-1970
  • Miscellaneous
    • Information on Gay Robertson Blackford

Manuscript Group 208
Raymond P. Shafer Papers

Raymond P. Shafer (b. 1917), lawyer and Republican Party politician, was twice elected president of the Crawford County Bar Association; served two terms as district attorney of Crawford County; was elected to the Pennsylvania State Senate, 1958; was Pennsylvania's lieutenant governor, 1963-67; and served as governor, 1967-71. Raymond Philip Shafer was born the youngest of five children to Rev. David P. and Mina Belle Shafer on March 5 1917, in New Castle, Lawrence County. The family moved to Meadville, Crawford County in 1933 when David was appointed pastor of First Christian Church. Ray Shafer attended and graduated from public school in Meadville in 1934 where he served as valedictorian. He continued his education as a political science major at nearby Allegheny College where he served as class president for four years. Shafer was also an All-Pennsylvania basketball player as well as an All-American soccer player. He graduated in 1938. While at Allegheny he met Jane Harris Davies (class of 1939). They were married on July 5, 1941.

Shafer attended Yale University Law School from where he received the L.L. B. in 1941. Classmates at Yale included numerous individuals later associated with civic affairs including Gerald R. Ford, William W. Scranton, Cyrus Vance, and Sargent Shriver. Following law school Shafer was commissioned as an ensign in the U.S. Navy serving from 1942 to 1945 as a P.T. boat captain and in Naval intelligence. He later earned the rank of full lieutenant and received the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, and the Commendation for Meritorious Service. Following World War II Shafer went into law practice in Meadville and was elected as Crawford County District Attorney serving from 1948-1956. In 1958 he won election to represent Pennsylvania’s 50th State Senatorial District and served from 1959 to 1963. In the spring of 1962 Shafer agreed to run as lieutenant governor with William W. Scranton of Lackawanna County. Aligned with the progressive wing of the Republican Party, Scranton and Shafer defeated Philadelphia Mayor Richardson Dilworth by 486,000 votes and took office in January 1963.

In the spring 1966 primary, Republicans supported Raymond Shafer for governor and the Commonwealth’s Attorney General, Walter E. Alessandroni, for lieutenant governor. When Alessandroni was killed in a tragic plane crash before the election Philadelphian Raymond J. Broderick—a lawyer and prominent regional Republican—filled out the ticket. Shafer and Broderick ran against Philadelphia millionaire Milton J. Shapp who secured the primary by defeating Democratic nominee Robert P. Casey of Lackawanna County. Despite Shapp’s aggressive campaign Shafer, trumpeting the Scranton-Shafer record, won the general election by 241,630 votes. The Republican Party maintained small majorities in both the state Senate and House of Representatives. Shafer’s administration is perhaps best known for reforms that were made to the Commonwealth’s antiquated 1874 constitution. Another major theme of his four-year term was state government reorganization to better accommodate programs and policies that reflected the needs and demands of the times. Growth in state programs and spending for education and welfare also dominated most of Shafer’s tenure.

A bi-partisan constitutional convention convened in December 1967 and completed its work by late February 1968. Once again reforms were placed before the electorate to allow political subdivisions to elect home-rule, raise the ceiling on state borrowing, subject all state financial affairs to audits, mandate that the governor annually develop and submit a spending plan for state programs, establish new tax rules particularly for real estate and public utilities, and create a unified judicial system under the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Though the revisions were criticized for not doing enough to reform state government—such as reducing the size of the General Assembly—they won majority approval by voters in April 1968. Besides constitutional revisions, state government was reorganized to more acutely address issues prevalent in the late 1960s. In 1970 Shafer signed Act 275 to create the Department of Environmental Resources. The agency’s functions included environmental and natural resource protection in addition to land, water, state park, and state forest management, and mining regulation. The Commonwealth also invested in programs to clean streams of acid mine drainage, long a problem left over from a largely bygone era and industry. Shafer signed Act 120 of 1970 to consolidate state-run transportation functions housed in four separate agencies into the new Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. PennDOT was given responsibility to develop and maintain a safe, adequate, and efficient transportation infrastructure. Its creation coincided with the near completion of Pennsylvania’s portion of the nation’s interstate highway system. By the end of Shafer’s term about 85 percent of the interstate system was open to traffic across the state including Interstates 80, 81, and 79 (named the Raymond P. Shafer Highway). Shafer also authorized an equal employment opportunity initiative to eliminate discrimination among highway construction contractors.

With some reluctance, Shafer signed Act 195 on July 23, 1970, making Pennsylvania the first state in the nation to permit its public employees to bargain collectively, join a union, and strike. Act 195 superseded a 1947 statute that prohibited such activities. The law resulted from a study by the Public Employee Law Commission (otherwise known as the Hickman Commission) that recommended numerous changes in the relationship between public sector employees and employers.

  • General File
    • Information on the Governor's Commission on Women, AAUW, Republican Women, YWCA, etc…

Manuscript Group 211
Richmond Ladies Soldiers Aid Society
Microfilmed

Records of the Mansfield, Pa. chapter of the Richmond Ladies Soldiers Aid Society (later the Mansfield Ladies Soldiers Aid Society). The organizations was founded on September 26, 1861. Included are a minute book, 1861-64, 1 vol.; report, October 28, 1863, 1 item; lists of contributions, 1863-1864, n. d., 4 items; and correspondence, 1863-65, 22 items, of Mrs. Sarah E. Morris, secretary of the Richmond Ladies Soldiers Aid Society and associate manager of the Women's Pennsylvania Branch of the U. S. Sanitation Commission. Correspondents include Dorothea Dix, Clara Moore and, Abby Lynch.

  • Minute Book, 1861-64.
  • Report, Oct. 28, 1863
  • Correspondence, 1863-65, 1866, 1897, n.d.
    • Includes correspondence of Sarah E. Morris (Secretary of the Society and Associate Manager of the Women's Pennsylvania Branch of the US Sanitary Commission), Dorothea Dix, Clara Moore and, Abby Lynch.
  • Lists of Contributions , 1863 - 64, n.d.
  • Book
    The United States Sanitary Commission, published 1863. Includes a chapter on "Aspect of the War to Women."

Manuscript Group 212
William E. Stewart Collection

Miscellaneous printed and manuscript materials, relating generally to military, patriotic, and political matters, including the following: The Soldier's Pocket-Book; The Soldier's Prayer Book, 1861; Republican Campaign Text Book: Patriotism-Protection-Prosperity, 1910; Lincoln Highway Association certificate, 1913; The Voter's Guide: A Digest of the Election Laws of Pennsylvania, 1915; World War II ration books and related items, 1942-45.

  • Miscellaneous Papers
    • Includes postcards, Barosma domestic advice book, information on the temperance movement and the Women's Christian Temperance Union, political information, and advertisements depicting women's roles in the home.

Manuscript Group 213
Postcard Collection

Postcards-also advertising, greeting, political, and patriotic cards and similar pictorial material-generally arranged by counties and showing urban and rural scenes; historic, public, commercial, industrial, and private buildings; churches; bridges and streams; railroads; roads and highways, etc.

  • Postcards
    • Items depict women in Pennsylvania.

Manuscript Group 214
Warren J. Harder Collection

  • Lantern Slides
    • Depict women in Pennsylvania, women during the colonial era, etc…
  • Reference Materials
    • Advertisement for a female runaway slave.
  • Subject File
    • Includes ads, newspaper clippings, photos, etc.

Manuscript Group 215
Ethnic Studies Collection
Microfilmed

Collections, to be added to on a regular basis, contain: a general newspaper collection; photographs of immigrant workers, families, ethnic and religious organizations; church anniversary histories; and individual collections pertaining to Pennsylvania ethnic groups obtained under the Pennsylvania Ethnic Studies Program sponsored by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Includes items pertaining to African-Americans, Carpatho-Russian, Croatian, German, Hungarian, Italian, Jewish, Lithuanian, Polish, Serbian, Slovak, Slovene-Windish, Ukrainian, and Welsh. Many of the items highlight women's experiences among various groups.

  • Anniversary Books
  • Correspondence
  • Photographs
  • Programs, Certificates, & Misc. Biographical Material
  • Publications
  • Sound-Recordings
  • Post Cards and Misc. Pamphlets
  • News Releases

Manuscript Group 216
Carlisle Indian School Collection

After witnessing the US military's problems with Native Americans, Lt. Richard Henry Pratt envisioned a school where teachers could immerse Native Americans into American culture and purge them of their tribal pasts in the process. Pratt gained support from the US Department of Interior's Indian Office and founded the Carlisle Indian School in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. In existence from 1879 to 1918, the Carlisle Indian School educated hundreds of Native American children and assimilated them into American culture. Forbidden to speak their native tongue, wear their native clothing, or keep their long hair, Native American children learned trades and received formal education for at least two years. When school was not in session, students lived with local families to further engage in American culture. This Outing System prevented children from returning to their homes and reinitiating themselves with Native American culture. The school did successfully assimilate many of its students, who later became famous, especially as athletes.

The US Congress, though at first cautious about Indian Schools, decided to support Pratt's system. Throughout the United States, more Indian schools were founded, modeled after the Carlisle Indian School. At the turn of the 20th century, Indian school enrollments peaked across the country - the Carlisle Indian School housed 1,000 students from about 70 tribes. By the end of World War I, however, the Carlisle Indian School no longer proved a success. With Native Americans showing patriotism by joining the American military and Native American children receiving education on the reservations, the War Department decided to close some of the Indian schools, including the one in Carlisle.

The collection contains various pamphlets, letters, photographs, and reports describing the function of life at the Carlisle Indian School. The Annual Report for 1910 details expenses made for the year up to June 30, 1910. The Indian Helper, a weekly letter published at the Carlisle Indian School, included information about what was going on at the School. In the March 4, 1898 issue, the 1898 commencement exercises are discussed, as well as a brief overview of the School, and the proper ways to treat an Indian. The collection also contains a letter from 19 year old Joshua Given, a Native American pupil of the School, to W.D. Blackburn on August 28, 1880 describing the non civilized manner of Native Americans and the benefit of the Indian School to Native American children. The 1906 commencement program and the 1912 program honoring Carlisle's Olympic heroes show how important academics and athletics were to the School. The 1912 catalogue, similar to a college catalogue of today, examines courses, housing, activities, and responsibilities while attending the School. Various photographs from 1878-1903 depict life at the school. The three publications represented in the collection discuss three important aspects of the School - the founding, the Outing System, and Jim Thorpe, the Carlisle Indian School's most well known pupil.

  • Annual Report, 1910
    • Includes information on young women's experience at the school.
  • The Indian Helper, Vol. XIII, No. 20, March 4, 1898
  • Letter
    • Joshua Given from the Training School for Indian Youth to WD Blackburn in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1880 highlighting the "Outing Program"
  • Programs Commencement, 1906
    • Includes photos of young women at the school including a picture of the female basketball team.
  • Photographs, 1878-1903
    • Includes photos of young women at the school including a picture of the female basketball team.
  • Publications
    • R.L. Brunhouse, "The Founding of the Carlisle Indian School," Reprint from Pennsylvania History, April 1939.
    • R.L. Brunhouse, "Apprenticeship for Civilization: The Outing System at the Carlisle Indian School," Reprint from Educational Outlook, May 1939.

Manuscript Group 218
Photograph Collections

Collections of photographs, generally arranged by counties, pertaining to Pennsylvania's forges and furnaces, iron and steel companies, coal and other mines, gristmills, sawmills, covered bridges, transportation systems (canals, roads and turnpikes, railroads, etc.) and county courthouses.

  • Industry
  • Buildings
    • Includes schools and houses of worship.
  • Agriculture
  • Stereographs
  • Political
  • Miscellaneous

Manuscript Group 219
Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection

Photographic files of the Philadelphia Commercial Museum, which was founded in 1894 to promote American and foreign commerce and to collect information concerning the products of world trade. The name of the museum was changed in 1966 to the Museum of the Philadelphia Civic Center. Photographic files, arranged by counties and by subjects, include these major categories: Pennsylvania scenes; Philadelphia scenes; American Indians; agriculture; educational institutions (Carlisle Indian School, Dickinson College, Swarthmore College, University of Pennsylvania, etc.); industry (airplane, aluminum, automobile, brick, cement, clothing, coal, electric, fur, gas, glass, iron and steel, lumber, mining, paper, petroleum, pottery, printing, radio, railroad, rubber, shipbuilding, street car, telephone, etc.); natural science (birds, fish, wild life, etc.; and transportation (air, canal, coach and wagon, mail, railroad, river, sailboat, steamship, etc.).

  • Pennsylvania Scenes, [ca. 1840-1854].
    • Includes images of women organized by county.
  • Subject File, [ca. 1840-1854].
    • Includes women in agriculture, industry, Native Americans, people, and transportation.

Manuscript Group 262
Special Microfilm Collections

The Special Microfilm Collections consist of microfilm copies of Pennsylvania records and manuscripts that are primarily held by other institutions. The manuscript group was created over the past sixty years through a combination of extensive purchases of microfilm from other archival institutions and special arrangements made with individual donors to permit the microfilming of letters, diaries, and business records. Because of its diverse sources and themes, these collections complement many of the records and manuscripts in the custody of the State Archives. For a more detailed description see the published Guide to the Microfilm Collections in the Pennsylvania State Archives by Roland M. Baumann and Diane S. Wallace. This material spans the pre-colonial period down to the mid-twentieth century. The film is grouped into eleven categories:

  • Historical Records:
    • Allegheny College Ida Tarbell Collection, [ca. 1900-1937]. (microfilm rolls #6406-6425)
    • Pennsylvania Labor History, Newspaper Excerpts, 1827-1853. (microfilm rolls #1633-1634)
  • Theses and Dissertations:
    • "The Amish Family in Mifflin County, Pa.," by John Andrew Hostetler (Penn State University, 1951). (microfilm roll #2154)
    • "Working Women in Philadelphia, 1900-1930," by Barbara M. Klaczynska (Temple University, 1975). (microfilm roll #2158)
  • Newspapers:
    • America, Jan. 1, 1954-Dec. 30, 1975. (microfilm rolls #2921-2936)
    • Banner von Berks, 1864-1888. (Microfilm rolls #2848-2860)
    • Der Pilger, 1871, 1877-1881. (Microfilm rolls #2839-2841)
    • Der Readinger Postbothe, Aug. 3, 1816 - July 22, 1822. (Microfilm roll #2843)
    • Druid, 1910-1939. (Microfilm rolls #2660-2667)
    • Il Patriota, Aug. 15, 1914 - Oct. 29, 1955. (microfilm rolls #2651-2659)
    • Italian Tribune News, Jan. - Dec. 1975. (microfilm rolls #2937-1938)
    • Jednosc, Oct. 10, 1929 - May 30, 1963. (Microfilm rolls #2668-2679)
    • Jewish Voice, 1923-1924. (Microfilm roll #2842)
    • La Libera Parola, Jan. 1, 1927 - July 18, 1969. (Microfilm rolls #2723-2734)
    • Ordine Nuovo, May 24, 1936 - Dec. 28, 1950, May 18, 1957 - May 28, 1962. (Microfilm rolls #2680-2684)
    • Philadelphia Tageblatt, Nov. 19, 1877 - Dec. 31, 1909; Jan 1 - Sept. 30, 1911; July 1 - Dec. 30, 1917; Jan 1, 1919 - Dec. 31, 1926; April 1 - June 30,
    • 1928; July 1 - Sept. 30, 1929. (microfilm rolls #2735-2838)
    • Pittsburczanin, Jan. 2, 1924 - March 12, 1976. (Microfilm rolls #2876-2920)
    • Polish American Journal, Feb. 2, 1919 - 1972. (microfilm rolls #2685-2704)
    • Post Eagle, Jan. 2 - Dec. 25, 1974. (microfilm roll #2939)
    • Republi Kaner Von Berks, 1869-1898. (Microfilm rolls #2861-2875)
    • Sons of Italy Times, Jan. 12, 1952 - April 20, 1957; Dec. 30, 1963 - Dec. 29, 1969. (microfilm rolls #2719-2722)
    • Vienybe Lietuvniku, 1891-1893; Jan. 5, 1895 - Nov. 18, 1917. (microfilm rolls #2705-2718)

Manuscript Group 264
International Utilities Political Memorabilia Collection

International Utilities (I.U.) of Philadelphia is a business conglomerate with diversified services in distribution, agriculture, utilities and other areas. The memorabilia relates to successful and unsuccessful United States presidential candidates, their vice-presidential running mates, and their election campaigns. Also included are materials relating to national political issues, such as the tariff, sectionalism, slavery, the Civil War, reconstruction, expansionism, progressivism, and others. Types of materials include autographs clipped from unidentified documents, undated; various books published between 1860-1972 containing histories of candidates and issues; campaign literature such as election leaflets, brochures and handouts, 1864-1972; political cartoons taken from various newspapers and magazines, 1860-1864, and 1972; envelopes with printed or engraved campaign symbols and slogans, 1856-1971; presidential inauguration souvenir programs, 1885-1969; letters either written by the candidates or in support or opposition to them, 1813-1972; selected issues of magazines, 1860-1868, and newspapers, 1836-1968, recording historical events as they pertain to the candidates; pamphlets containing the text of speeches by congressmen and others on various national political issues, 1796-1912; engravings, photographs and postcards of formal portraits of the candidates, their running mates and families, 1789-1972; campaign tickets, 1839-1900; and miscellaneous items including sheet music from the William Henry Harrison Campaign, 1840.

  • Autographs (clipped) , n. d.
  • Ballots (tickets), 1839-1900
  • Books, 1860-1972
  • Campaign Literature, 1861-1972
  • Cartoons, 1860-1884, 1972
  • Envelopes (covers only), 1856-1971
  • Inaugural Programs, 1885-1969
  • Letterheads, 1861-1868, 1964, n.d.
  • Letters, 1813-1972, n.d. Magazines, 1860-1968
  • Miscellaneous, 1794-1968
  • Newspapers, 1836-1968
  • Pamphlets, 1796-1912, ca. 1930
    • Freedom v. Slavery. Speech of John Hutchins, of Ohio. Delivered in the US House of Representatives, May 2, 1860
  • Photographs and engravings, 1789-1972
  • Postcards, 1888-1972
  • Posters, 1789-1972

Manuscript Group 275
Misc. Manuscripts of the Revolutionary War Era
Microfilmed

This collection was created by the State Archives for miscellaneous correspondence, extracts, receipts, petitions and certificates relating to the Revolutionary War era. It consists of about 275 items, of which nearly 213 fall within the period 1776 to 1786. About a half-dozen are dated before 1776 and two dozen after 1786. Forty items are listed as having no date. The collection is arranged chronologically, beginning with 1771 and ending with undated items.

Thematically, the collection pertains to the political, military, and fiscal activities and policies during the American Revolution in Pennsylvania and the early United States. There are letters of some Pennsylvania notables. Documents of particular interest include items of Timothy Pickering, Charles Pettit, David Grier, John McDowell, and John Davis, all in the Department of the Quartermaster General, and Robert Morris (relating to his resignation as Superintendent of Finance). There are also important letters for New Jersey's Elias Boudinot, and Massachusetts Congressman Elbridge Gerry. In addition, the collection contains papers relating to the Wyoming Controversy and the activities of the Continental Board of War, the Constitutional Convention, and the Council of Censors. Finally, there are minutes of the Susquehanna Company (1753-1786), a private land speculation business financed mainly by Connecticut citizens. It surveyed land in what is now Wilkes-Barre and it was involved in the Pennsylvania land dispute with Connecticut.

For further detailed information about this collection see Guide to the Microfilm of the Miscellaneous Manuscripts of the Revolutionary War Era, 1771-1791 edited by Roland M. Baumann.

  • General Correspondence, 1771-1778, 1779-1784 1785-1791, n. d.
    • Includes women's correspondence from the Revolutionary Period.

Manuscript Group 278
Eunice Mildred McCloskey Papers

Eunice Mildred McCloskey, a noted novelist, poet, and painter, was born in 1906 in Ridgeway, Pennsylvania. Once described as the Grandma Moses of Pennsylvania, Eunice McCloskey was an accomplished painter and writer with over seventeen published books and approximately four thousand paintings. McCloskey was a member of the Professional Hall of Fame and a Fellow of the International Institute of Arts and Letters.

The collection contains personal correspondence, scrapbooks, newspapers and clippings (many from the Ridgeway Record), manuscripts of novels, celebrity autographs, and magazine reviews, 1931-1979.

  • General Correspondence, 1949-1977.
  • Manuscripts, Agreements, and Citations, 1956-1970, [undated].
    • "Little French Clock," by Eunice McCloskey, undated typescript with corrections.
    • "O Shanna, Shana," by Eunice McCloskey, undated typescript.
    • "O Thessly, Beloved," by Eunice McCloskey, undated typescript with corrections, 132 pp. -
    • "August Afternoon," printed, undated, 7 versions.
  • Exhibit Materials, Poetry and Memorabilia, 1935-1976.
    • Poetry, 1935-1970
  • Magazines, 1931-1970.
    • The Pen Woman, March, June 1947; June 1948; October 1949; October-December 1950; January-June, December 1951; February, April 1952; Biennial October 1954; June 1953; November 1956; November 1957; October 1958; May, June, October 1959; March 1965; April 1971, October 1976
  • Newspaper Clippings, 1955-1977.
  • Scrapbooks, 1957-1977.
  • Photographs

Manuscript Group 283
Genevieve Blatt Papers

Genevieve Blatt (b. 1913 - d. 1996), known as the "first lady" of Pennsylvania politics, was the first woman elected to a statewide political office in Pennsylvania and became the first woman to sit as a Pennsylvania appellate judge. Born in East Brady, Pa., she attended the University of Pittsburgh and received _ her B.A. in 1933 and her M.A., in 1934. At the 1936 Democratic Convention in Philadelphia she was the first delegate to vote for Franklin Delano Roosevelt. In 1937, she obtained a law degree from the University of Pittsburgh Law School. As Solicitor for the City of Pittsburgh, she drafted the first smokestack ordinance to protect the environment. In 1947 Blatt was among the founders of the Americans for Democratic Action and also served as the Chief Examiner of the Pittsburgh Civil Service Commission.

In 1950 Blatt ran on the Democratic ticket as a candidate for Auditor General. She was elected as state Secretary of Internal Affairs in 1954, holding this office for three consecutive terms. In 1956 she was honored as a Distinguished Daughter of Pennsylvania. The Democratic nominee for the US Senate in 1964, she lost to incumbent Republican Senator Hugh Scott. From 1964 through 1968, she served as a member of President Johnson's Consumer Advisory Council and subsequently as Assistant Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity. While judge of the Commonwealth Court, 1971-1993, Blatt ruled that high school sports teams in Pennsylvania could no longer discriminate on the basis of gender.

An important aspect of her life was her work within the Catholic Church, where she was instrumental in the canonization of two saints: St. Elizabeth Ann Seton (1975) and St. John Newman (1977). In 1989 she was instrumental in bringing the time-honored tradition of the "Red Mass" to the Capitol Region. Judge Blatt was also the recipient of three medals from popes in recognition of her work with church and society.

  • Campaign Scrapbooks, 1948-1964
  • Appointment Books, 1956, 1958-1967
  • Excerpts and Press Releases, 1763, 1804, 1952, 1963-1966, 1968-1982, & undated
  • Campaign Files, 1962-1966 Family Materials, 1939-1993 (not inclusive)
  • Filed Opinions, 1970-1984 General Correspondence, 1966-1992
  • Pennsylvania Department of Internal Affairs File, 1955-1966
    • Items document her testimony before the House Bipartisan Committee and the establishment of the Department of Community Affairs, among other topics.
  • Memorabilia, 1938-1987
    • Includes personal invitations, travel and political souvenirs, appointments and awards, and prints and lithographs.
  • Photographs, 1932-1989
    • Subjects include Blatt's career, portraits of Blatt, intercollegiate conference on government, pioneer women in government, Pittsburgh scenes, miscellaneous, and Democratic National Conventions.
  • Publicity File, 1934-1976
    • includes political correspondence, newspaper clippings, and pamphlets relating to State and National Democratic Committees, politics, and Blatt's career
  • Religious File, 1947-1993
  • Scrapbook Materials, 1913-1992 (not inclusive)
  • Subject Files, 1972-1973
    • Subjects include aging, Constitutional Revision (State), InterCollegiate Conference on Government Receipts, financial records, speeches, television and radio scripts, newspaper clippings, and the women's movement.
  • First Women Graduates of the National Service Academies Materials,
    • Concerning West Point Commencement, 1980

Manuscript Group 290
Valley Forge Branch of the Woman's National Farm and Garden Association

Valley Forge Branch of the Woman's National Farm and Garden Association was a Women's Organization in Hoellville, Pa, Chester County. The organization promoted women's involvement with the agricultural community.

  • Minutes, Dec. 1931-Dec. 1941
    • Records dates, locations and attendees of meetings, along with information about the organization of the Association and activities sponsored by its membership.

Manuscript Group 297
Mary Sachs Collection

Collection of Mary Sachs, 1928-1960. Harrisburg philanthropist, owner of successful retail stores in Harrisburg and Lancaster, and founder of Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University, Mary Sachs (1888-1960) was active in such Jewish organizations as the United Jewish Appeal and Israel Bond Campaign. Collection provides background on Ms. Sach's rise from humble beginnings as a nineteen year old Jewish immigrant factory worker to the status of a "Merchant Princess," as she was referred to in the Congressional Record (1958).

  • Correspondence
    • Correspondence from Eleanor Roosevelt and a 1933 letter from President Franklin Roosevelt.
  • Writings
    • Paper by Milton Bernstein entitled, "Study of a Creative Woman," (undated)
  • Photographs
    • Mainly photos of the stores, including photos of African-American and Hispanic clerks and staff employed in the Lancaster and Harrisburg stores.
  • Newspaper Clippings
  • Scrapbooks
  • Philanthropic Memorabilia
  • Business Records, 1932-1960

Manuscript Group 298
Lucile Wilson Collection

A collection of photographs, prints, engravings, broadsides, and a map donated by Mrs. Lucille (James) Wilson of Las Vegas, .Nevada, Among the items found are an 1812 portrait of Eugene Alexander Fruauff, a 1793 portrait of The Reverend Benjamin Latrobe, and an 1857 portrait of Governor Joseph Ritner. The etchings include views of Linden Hall Seminary for Young Ladies in Lititz, the Boy's Academy in Lititz, and the Hotel Lititz. Photographs include views of Linden Hall, formal class portraits taken at Linden Hall, views of Millersville Normal School, the "old Chapel" in Bethlehem, the John Man Farm in Donegal Township near Columbia in Lancaster County, and Sunnyside College, (location unknown).

  • Etchings
    • Linden Hall Seminary for Young Ladies
  • Photographs, early women's education
    • Linden Hall Seminary for Young Ladies
    • Millersville Normal School

Manuscript Group 299
Commonwealth Association of Students

The records were donated by Robin Winston, Executive Director of Commonwealth Association of Students (CAS) in 1980. CAS was founded in 1973 by students from Pennsylvania state schools (East Stroudsburg State College, Millersville State College, Bloomsburg State College, etc.) as a student lobbying organization. Its goals were to combat rising costs and budget cutbacks in the Pennsylvania college and state university system and to promote quality education. In 1983, the State System Board of Governors eliminated the tuition form dues checkoff system that funded CAS, and consequently CAS ceased functioning in 1986.

  • Correspondence
    • Discussing Affirmative Action.
  • Board of Minority Representatives, 1976-1977
    • Discusses Affirmative Action and minority experiences within higher education.

Manuscript Group 309
Milton J. Shapp Papers

Milton Jerrold Shapp (b. June 25, 1912) was Governor of Pennsylvania from 1971-1979. A prominent Philadelphia businessman and pioneer in the Cable TV industry prior to entering politics, Shapp also acted as a member of the United States Department of Commerce's Economic Development Program, 1961-1963; and a candidate for president of the United States in 1976.Milton J. Shapp was a pioneer in cable television. Two influences, good business sense and concern for the welfare of all people, came to Shapp early in life. Born as Milton Jerrold Shapiro, his father, Aaron Shapiro, was a Republican hardware wholesaler in Cleveland, where Shapp was born on June 25, 1912. His mother, the former Eva Smelsey, was a Democrat and a leader in that city’s women’s rights movement. His fascination with ham radios led to his decision to pursue related studies. Shapp graduated from Case Institute of Technology (now Case-Western Reserve University) with a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering during the depths of the Depression, in 1933. His first job was driving a coal truck. The future governor later changed his name from Shapiro to Shapp due to concerns of prejudice against persons of the Jewish faith.

In 1966, Shapp entered the primary race for governor. Shapp’s personal wealth and growing influence in business and government circles provided the resources to campaign independently for governor. Shapp refused to lock step with Democratic bosses, and the Democrats, instead, endorsed Robert P. Casey. Capitalizing on the public’s suspicion of machine politics and using strategies from the campaign that initially brought John F. Kennedy into office, Shapp ran his campaign on a theme of “man against the machine.” He bypassed the Democratic political machine and trampled the endorsed candidate in the primary, which left many Democratic workers unhappy that their party preferred candidate had lost. On November 4, just before the election, at a rally in Pittsburgh, former Governor David Lawrence pleaded for party unity. Although a consummate politician and traditional political boss, Lawrence was also pragmatic and put party unity first. Ironically, the former governor and mayor of Pittsburgh collapsed at the podium and died seventeen days later without learning that Shapp was defeated by Raymond P. Shafer by just under 242,000 votes. Because Shafer was the last governor in Pennsylvania’s history prohibited from serving two terms in a row and because Shafer’s tax proposals were unpopular with voters, this presented an excellent opportunity for the Democrats. Six Democrats weighed into the primary, including Robert P. Casey. Again, Shapp ran an effective campaign, defeating Casey by about 730,000 to 481,000 votes, with the other four Democrats running far behind. In the general election, Shapp, with state Senator Ernest P. Kline for lieutenant governor, defeated the Republican ticket of Raymond J. Broderick and Ralph Scalera by just over 500,000 votes, considered then to be a landslide. Shapp was the first governor elected under the state Constitution of 1968 and the first governor allowed to serve two successive terms in office. He was also the first governor of the Jewish faith.

He spent the first years of his administration instituting a program of modern management and restoring fiscal stability to a state on the brink of bankruptcy. Shapp also won national attention for his consumer advocate policies, innovative programs for the elderly and handicapped, and sweeping welfare reforms. Shapp, who was a successful businessman before entering politics, established a reputation as a tough but fair negotiator when he brought together all sides to end a national strike by independent truckers in February 1974. A month later he helped avert a shut down of the nation’s gas service stations and defused a second truckers’ strike in May 1974.

His businesslike approach to government, strong sensitivity to the plight of the disadvantaged and the “little guy,” and overriding conviction that government must serve as an advocate of all the people made his a popular governor. In the primary election of 1974, two Democrats tried to challenge Shapp—Harvey F. Johnston, who had over 106,000 votes, and Philadelphia state Representative Martin P. Mullen, whose extreme conservative views proved unpopular with voters statewide, had fewer than 200,000 votes. They were no match for Shapp’s 729,201 votes. On November 5, 1974, Shapp became Pennsylvania’s first constitutional governor to be elected two terms in a row by an overwhelming 300,000-vote margin over the Republican candidate Drew Lewis.

Shapp’s wife, the former Muriel Matzkin, shared the governor’s intense concern for disadvantaged people. She was a certified marriage counselor and part-time instructor at two Harrisburg hospitals. Shortly after the governor’s inauguration in 1971, she converted several rooms of the governor’s residence into an education facility for brain-damaged children and a Late Start program for senior citizens. Governor and Mrs. Shapp raised three children, Dolores (Graham), Richard, and Joanne.

Shapp was also a candidate for president in a campaign that lasted eighty-nine days. On February 29, 1976, Shapp was given eligibility to receive primary federal matching funds for a campaign organization to seek the Democratic presidential nomination. Shapp finished fourth out of five candidates in Pennsylvania’s primary and did not do well in primaries in Florida and Massachusetts. Shapp’s political popularity was apparently limited to being governor of Pennsylvania, and he dropped out of the race. On May 12 of the following year, the Federal Election Commission ruled that Shapp was ineligible for federal matching funds and was ordered to repay the federal government.

Milton J. Shapp died on November 24, 1994, his body cremated. A $20,000 memorial engineering scholarship in Shapp’s honor was established in 1996 by Motorola Corporation, the company that bought out General Instrument and the electronics legacy of the governor’s former company, Jerrold Electronics.

  • General File
    • Includes information on Pennsylvania women's organizations such as NOW, AAUW, and the YWCA.

Manuscript Group 317
Mary Barnum Bush Hauck Collection

Mary B.B. Hauck was a Harrisburg piano teacher and Pennsylvania State Supervisor of Music for the Emergency Education Program under the Works Progress Administration, 1937-42. She organized Dauphin County Folk Festivals, 1935-61; and was director of USO program services at Fort Indiantown Gap, 1943-46.

  • Business Correspondence
  • Miscellaneous
    • Includes memos, lecture notes, music books, festival posters, and newsclippings.
  • Photographs
  • WPA Material
    • Contains original drawings by Edward C. Michener and printed posters by other artists of the WPA Art Project.

Manuscript Group 335
Violet Harner Wise Photos

Violet Harner Wise (b. 1906) was a Harrisburg employee for various state government agencies, 1930-1964. A technical photographer for the Department of Property and Supplies, as an amateur photographer she often spent her lunch hours recording interesting scenes and events around the city with a Super Ikonta camera, a gift from a German soldier in World War II.

The collection consists of forty-nine color 5"x7" photoprints and 35 mm negatives copied from Wise's original anachrome and ectachrome slides. The State Archives created the slides in October of 1980. Ms. Wise retains the originals. There is no restriction on reproduction.

The photographs are arranged by subject. Subjects include construction phases of the M. Harvey Taylor Bridge, 1950-1951; the dismantling and removal of the Civil War monument at Second and Arch Streets, 1958; the widening and repaving of Forster Street, 1950; and abandoned buildings awaiting demolition including Central High School, the Reily Homestead, and the Nissely Mansion.

  • Photos

Manuscript Group 342
George H. Earle Papers

George H. Earle III served as Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania from 1935-1939. Born in Devon, Chester County, Pennsylvania on December 5, 1890, Earle attended Harvard University and served as a private in the Second Pennsylvania Infantry under General John J. Pershing during the Mexican Border Campaign in 1916. Earle enlisted in the United States Navy during World War I and after the war he distinguished himself in a number of businesses in Philadelphia including the Flamingo Sugar Mills, which he founded, and the Pennsylvania Sugar Company. During the 1930s he entered politics, supporting Franklin Roosevelt in the 1932 presidential election. His support won him appointment as United States Minister Plenipotentiary to the Republic of Austria in 1932, which post he resigned to run for Governor of Pennsylvania in 1934. During his term as governor, Earle obtained passage of the Equal Rights Act in 1935 prohibiting racial discrimination in hotels, restaurants, and places of amusement. After an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate in 1938, he served as United States Minister to Bulgaria in 1940 and Assistant Naval Attache to Turkey and Assistant Governor of Samoa from 1940 to 1945. He returned to private life in 1945 and died on December 3, 1974.

  • Mrs. George H. Earle Papers, 1934-1939.
    • Correspondence (Personal & Official), 1934-39; Misc., 1935-39

Manuscript Group 350
American Association of University Women,
Pennsylvania Division Records

Originally organized as the Pennsylvania-Delaware Division of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) on October 26, 1924, this organization grew in size until April, 1940, when two separate state divisions were formed. The Pennsylvania Division (AAUW-PA) reached a highwater mark in 1976-1977, as its local branches grew to 80 in number and its active membership exceeded 10,000. This deposit of records documents the state division's efforts to implement the national association's goals of uniting university alumnae "to further the advancement of women, to discharge their responsibilities to society and to continue their own intellectual growth."

With the exception of the early editions of the Division's Newsletter, The Keystoner, 1942-1981, and summaries of the minutes that appear in the History of the Pennsylvania Division, there are no records for the period 1924-1960. Most of the post-1960 records focus on activities at the division level, and include the minutes, division board member portolios, standing committee materials and division project files. The remainder deals with association topics, networking with other organizations, with folders containing progress reports, branch year books and correspondence from the local branches. Issues documented include women, youth and families; ecology; community development; and cultural and educational growth activities. Original biographical materials were submitted by various branches for possible inclusion in Our Hidden Heritage: Pennsylvania Women in History, edited by Janice H. McElroy.

  • Administrative Records
  • Division Records
  • Conferences, Conventions and Meetings
  • Networkings With Other Organizations
  • Association Topics
  • Division Projects Status of Women
  • Branch Files
  • Reference Files
  • Book
    • "I, That am Ever Stranger: Poems on Women's Experience."

Manuscript Group 351
Julious F. Sachse Deposit of Ephrata Cloister Materials

Microfilmed

Julius Friedrich Sachse (b. 1842 - d. 1919) was an author and historian from Philadelphia who specialized in researching Pennsylvania-German culture. Materials in this collection include correspondence, articles, books, hymns, wills, photographs and other materials either collected by or written by Sachse concerning the history and religious development of the Ephrata Cloister of the Seventh Day German Baptist Brethern formed at Ephrata in 1732 and its sister community, the Snow Hill Cloister, in Franklin County that was incorporated in 1823. The Ephrata Cloister was a mystical communal religious sect founded by Georg Conrad Beissel in 1728 and was noted for its fraktur, music, and 18th century imprints. Included are 18th century Ephrata imprints on religious subjects, hymn books, a copy of Geistliche Harmonien (Dresden, 1680), biographical material concerning leaders and members of the cloister, and information relating to other religious groups located in Lancaster and Chester Counties, including the Moravians (United Brethern), Schwenkfelders, Dunkards (Church of the Brethren, Conservative Dunkers), and Sabbatarians. Some of the material is in German.

  • Articles/Clippings, 1768-1906, undated.
    • Histories of the Ephrata Cloister.
  • Broadsides, ca1745-1846, undated.
  • Illustrations/Fraktur, 1709,1786, undated.
    • Embroidery pattern attributed to Ephrata Cloister by J. F. Sachse, undated.
    • Saron & Bethania, by J. F. Sachse, undated floor plans.
    • Sister's House, by J. F. Sachse, undated floor plan.
    • Unidentified verse for Catherina Mullerin, in German script, undated.
  • Imprints, 1729-1890, undated.
  • Legal/Business Records, 1700-1934, undated.
  • Letters, 1700-1930, undated.
    • Letter from Annie Zeigler, January 5, 18 13.
  • Minutes, 1823-1914.
  • Music/Hymns/Poems 1743-1901, undated.
    • Poem-"The Blind Girl" by Hannah M. Burket, January 1873, broadside.
  • Photographs, 1893, undated.
  • Population Records, 1823-1891, undated.
    • The Chronicon of the Ephrata Sisterhood
  • Reports, 1890-1910, undated.
  • Miscellaneous, 1746-1928, undated.
  • Snow Hill Miscellaneous, 1824-1852, undated.

Manuscript Group 354
Old Economy Village Collection
Microfilmed

Old Economy Village is the restored 19th century home of the Harmonists, a Christian communal society known for its piety and industrial prosperity. The Harmony Society was founded by George Rapp, a German Pietist who believed in the need for more purity in the Christian faith. Gathering a group of followers, Rapp left Wurtemerg, Germany to come to America in 1803. The Harmonists formed a communal society in Butler County, Pennsylvania in 1805. In 1814, the group moved to Harmony, Indiana, hoping to further their industrial growth with the advantage of river transportation. In 1825, the Harmony Society returned to Pennsylvania, establishing their third and final home they called Economy near Ambridge. The Harmonists were well known worldwide for the production of wool, cotton and silk, and Economy became known as the pioneer American silk center in the 1830's and 1840's. Except for a brief split of the Society in 1832 due to the emergence of "Count de Leon," who claimed to be the Messiah, the Harmonists maintained a productive and peaceful way of life. With the death of their founder, the increased economic competition occasioned by the expanding industrial revolution, and the commitment to the practice of celibacy led to a gradual decline and eventual dissolution of the Society in 1905. After extended litigation, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania received title to the property of the Harmony Society in Economy. In 1919, Old Economy Village became a historic site operated by the Pennsylvania Historical Commission.

  • Mary Fruth Papers, 1897-1937
    • including Letters, Postcards, and Photographs
  • Journals

Manuscript Group 357
Pennsylvania Women's Legislative Exchange Records

The Pennsylvania Women's Legislative Exchange was created in 1968 to act as a conduit for information regarding legislative actions in the Commonwealth. Composed of representatives from more than twenty-five organizations concerned with legislative issues, the Exchange disseminates information concerning pending legislation that affects the interest areas of member organizations. The Collection contains correspondence (1971-1976), legislative conference files (1969-1981), financial statements (1969-1977) and minutes of monthly meetings (1972-78-not inclusive) of the PWLE. In addition, there are lists of organizational members (1972-78); and a description of the guidelines and organizational structure of the exchange (1975-81).

  • Financial Statements, 1969-1977.
  • Guidelines, ca 1981.
  • Legislative Conferences Attendance Figures, 1969-1973.
  • Lists, 1972-1978.
  • Minutes of Legislative Exchange Meetings, 1972-1978 (not inclusive).
  • Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1971-1976, undated.
  • Packet: "More Women in Politics", 1981.
  • Reports: 6th Annual Legislative Exchange, 1974.
  • Reports: Women and Policy - A Pilot Program, 1975.
  • Speech, undated.
  • Structure, 1975-1978.
  • Miscellaneous
    • Information on the federal ERA, divorce law, fertility rites, violence against women, displaced homemakers, international women's year, women's law project, Focus on Family Conference, PA Coalition Against Rape, National Council of Catholic Women, AAUW.

Manuscript Group 366
Graeme Park Collection
Microfilmed

Graeme Park is a historical site administered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The buildings of Graeme Park were constructed by Pennsylvania Deputy Governor William Keith, 1721-1722, and were originally used as a distillery. The property was sold to Dr. Thomas Graeme in 1739 who renovated it to serve as his country estate. Elizabeth Graeme Ferguson, Graeme's only surviving child, inherited the property and subsequently resided there. The property later passed to Dr.William Smith, Elizabeth's nephew by marriage, and he divided the estate and sold individual lots. In 1920, Mr. and Mrs. Welsh Strawbridge acquired the land on which the main house stands and restored the mansion to its original condition. In 1958, the Strawbridges gave the property to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

  • Commonplace Book
    • Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson, Commonplace Book, ca. 1787-1788

Manuscript Group 368
General Assembly Collections
Microfilmed

The collections of the General Assembly consist of material documenting the lives, careers, and activities of Pennsylvania legislators. It includes material gathered under the Legislative History Project that was divided into three phases: Oral history interviews with living members of the House or Senate, a legislative biography project, and a legislative records project that sought to acquire the papers of retired or deceased legislators. Included in the collection are the Anne Brancato Wood Papers.

Anne Brancato Wood Papers

Anne Brancato Wood tirelessly fought for women's rights, the protection of children, and labor rights as the first Democratic woman to serve in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. Born in South Philadelphia in 1903, Brancato attended the Sisters of Mercy Academy and Temple University. She entered politics in 1928, becoming the chair of the Women's Democratic Club of South Philadelphia. Later, in 1932, Brancato ran and won the Forth District seat in the State House of Representatives. She served as the first democratic woman elected to the State Legislature from 1932-1940 and again from 1945-1946. During her time in office, she sponsored and wrote important pieces of legislation, including the Pawnbroker's Act, the Hasty Marriage Act, the Mother's Assistance Fund Law, the Minimum Wage and Hour Law for Women, the Anti-Eviction Bill, and the Short Form Birth Certificate. In 1935 she served as Speaker Pro Tempore, the only woman to have ever done so in the Commonwealth's history.

After leaving office, Anne Brancato Wood continued her work in civic affairs until her death in 1972. The Anna Brancato Wood papers include information on the Philadelphia Women's Political Caucus, Shelter and Aid for Girls, Women's Property Rights, The Hasty Marriage Act, Women's Rights, Child Labor Law, Women in Politics, Women's Clubs, Women in PA, A History of Democratic Women, Women in Government.

  • Anna Brancato Wood Papers, 1932-1940, 1945-1946
    • Newspaper Scrapbook
    • Newspaper Clippings
    • House Resolutions
    • Radio Interviews
    • Political Memorabilia

Manuscript Group 386
Pennsylvania Federation of Women's Clubs Records

The Pennsylvania Federation of Women's Clubs was founded in 1895 in Philadelphia. The Federation unites and promotes legislation and civic, educational, moral and social initiatives relating to women. The object of the organization was to, "unite the influence and interests of PA women and to promote legislative, civic, educational, moral, and social measures." The organization was interested in conservation, education, international relations, legislation, welfare, children, industry, health and women in office.

Contains primarily the administrative files of the Federation, 1895-1982, including accounts, budgets, histories, issues of their newsletter, Pennsylvania Clubwoman, photographs of presidents and committee chairpeople, annual reports, treasurer's account books, yearbook directories, etc. Among these are records of special projects reflecting the Federation's contribution to Pennsylvania social welfare, including environmental conservation; history; homefront service during World War II; aiding the condition of the American Indian, 1961-1968; the restoration of Independence Hall; establishing a youth conservation program, 1945-1970; helping flood victims during the 1972 Hurricane Agnes disaster; and purchasing the Wilkins Farm area for the development of the Allegheny National Forest, 1929-1965.

The records of the Junior Women's Club are also included, which is a subsidiary of the Federation, supporting projects in addition to promoting independent projects, such as programs for the mentally retarded and youth.

  • Board Meeting and Convention Minutes, 1895-1976.
  • Reports Presented at Board Meetings & Annual Conventions, 1952-1968.
  • Administrative File, 1895-1982.
  • Miscellaneous histories of the organization, letters, etc...

Manuscript Group 404
Dick Thornburgh Papers

Richard (Dick) Thornburgh was born in Pittsburgh on July 16, 1932, the son of Charles G. and Alice Sanborn Thornburgh. He attended Pittsburgh area schools then Yale University where he earned a degree in engineering in 1954. Thornburgh completed a law degree with honors from the University of Pittsburgh in 1957 and, in 1958, became a member of the Pennsylvania Bar. He soon joined the law firm of Kirkpatrick and Lockhart.

While a practicing attorney, Thornburgh participated in Pittsburgh’s civic affairs. He made his first attempt at public office by unsuccessfully running for the US House of Representatives in 1966. He served as a delegate to Pennsylvania’s constitutional convention in 1967-88 and advocated inclusion of local government home-rule provisions in the revised document. In 1969 the Nixon Administration appointed him as US Attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania when he earned a reputation as an anti-racketeering prosecutor and enforcer of the federal Organized Crime Control Act. Thornburgh held the US Attorney’s post until 1975 when President Ford appointed him Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. He held the post until early 1977, when he returned to private law practice.

Thornburgh then launched a campaign for the governor’s office; an open seat in 1978 as two-term governor Milton Shapp was unable to succeed himself. Thornburgh secured the primary in a race that included Philadelphian Arlen Specter, but was an underdog against Democratic opponent and Pittsburgh Mayor Peter Flaherty. Like Republicans in an earlier era, Democrats had built a solid base in Pennsylvania. Since 1960 statewide Democratic voter registration outpaced the GOP. The gap continued to widen through the 1960s and 1970s and by the time of the 1978 gubernatorial election Democrats held a 900,000-registrant edge. Added to Thornburgh’s difficulties was his own polling that showed him down by thirty-two points about six months before the general election.

In an effort to gain an edge, Thornburgh put together a highly organized campaign, raised money, and identified several key campaign themes; ethical and clean government leading among them. This issue resonated well with voters as over 230 officials at all levels of public service in the Keystone State had been convicted of, admitted to, or pleaded no contest to corruption charges between 1970 and 1978 including several individuals in the Shapp Administration. Thornburgh also promised fiscal integrity, another important issue in a state that faced a sliding credit rating and an insolvency approximating $100 million. The GOP candidate challenged Flaherty’s record as Mayor, focused campaign efforts is the east where he was lesser known, and ran with lieutenant governor candidate William W. Scranton, III, whose well-known father had served as governor from 1963 to 1967. Thornburgh also courted non-traditional supporters including organized labor, black and Jewish voters, and Democrats dissatisfied with their party. Despite Flaherty’s counter efforts, Thornburgh won the governorship by a 228,000- vote margin. He won reelection on November 2, 1982 by about 100,000 votes against Democrat Allen Ertel.

A troubled economy plagued Thornburgh from the outset, as the state continued its transition away from heavy industry and manufacturing. One quip had it that “the national economy caught a cold; Pennsylvania came down with pneumonia”. The steel industry was particularly hard hit by foreign imports and the relocation of domestic mills. Tens of thousands of union jobs were lost, remaining workers faced wage cuts, and in the Pittsburgh metro area alone the industry’s workforce dropped from 41,500 in 1979 to 19,000 in 1983. When US Steel announced the full or partial closing of 28 facilities in the United States in late 1983, thousands of people in areas like the Mon Valley faced long-term unemployment. With the closing of apparel, textile, and other manufacturing facilities, some areas saw double-digit unemployment rates.

In response, Thornburgh launched the Ben Franklin Partnership, a well-received alliance between government, private industry, and research universities to foster high-tech enterprises. A Small Business Action Center was created and funding for the Pennsylvania Industrial Development Authority (PIDA) was quadrupled to attract new employers. The Commonwealth also implemented a customized job training program, a new travel and tourism initiative, and a $20 billion infrastructure improvement program. By the end of his term Thornburgh lay claim to creating 500,000 new jobs, most in service and technology. A reflection of the state’s economic woes remained evident, however, in its unemployment compensation program that had incurred a record $2.7 billion deficit by the early 1980s. Gradual economic improvements and statutory amendments reversed the fund’s negative cash flow by 1984, though its debt would not be eliminated until 1988.

Thornburgh also consolidated state-owned universities into an independent State System of Higher Education and created several “Governor’s Schools” for exceptional high school students. Energy remained high on the agenda as well. In an era of gasoline lines and public skepticism about nuclear energy, the Commonwealth established an Energy Development Authority and examined alternative energy technologies. Revitalizing the coal industry was even explored, though the idea never progressed nor did Thornburgh’s plan to dismantle state’s liquor control system.

Thornburgh’s lieutenant governor, William W. Scranton, III, narrowly lost the race to succeed him. Robert P. Casey of Lackawanna County took office on January 20, 1987. The former governor taught at Harvard University and directed its Institute of Politics from 1987 to 1988, was appointed as US attorney general and served from 1998 to 1991, and served as undersecretary general of the United Nations from 1992 to 1993. He unsuccessfully ran for US Senate from Pennsylvania in 1991 and currently serves as counsel to Kirkpatrick and Lockhart in Washington, D.C. Governor Thornburgh is married to the former Virginia (Ginny) Judson and has four sons; Peter, David, and John, and William.

  • Robert C. Wilburn, Secretary of Budget & Administrator
    • Governor's Office/Commission for Women, 1979-1982
  • Brian T. Baxter, Deputy Secretary for Employee Relations
    • Women's Issues
  • Proclamation
    • American Business Women's Association Scholarship Month, PA Women's Political Caucus Day, AAUW, Women's History Week.
  • News Releases Publications and Annual Reports
    • Pregnancies by Women's Age Groups-Live Births, Fetal Deaths, Induced Abortions, PA Residents 1976 to 1980, May 1983

Manuscript Group 406
Robert P. Casey Collection
Microfilmed

Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania from 1987 to 1995, Robert P. Casey was born in Jackson Heights, N.Y. in 1932 but grew up in Scranton, Pennsylvania. An accomplished basketball player, he attended Holy Cross College in Worcester, MA on an athletic scholarship. Graduating with a B.A. in English in 1953, he earned a J.D. at George Washington University Law School in 1956 and became an associate with the law firm of Covington & Burling in Washington DC Two years later he returned to Scranton where he opened his own law practice.

Casey represented Lackawanna County in the Pennsylvania State Senate in 1962 where he distinguished himself by authoring environmental legislation. In 1967 Casey served as a delegate to the Pennsylvania State Constitutional Convention, serving as First Vice President and playing a role in the writing and ratification of the Commonwealth's current constitution. Casey was elected to two terms as Pennsylvania Auditor General, 1969-1977, and in 1978 he joined the law firm of Dilworth, Paxson, Kalish & Kaufmann where he rose to become a senior partner. After his two terms as Governor of Pennsylvania, Casey continued to be involved in Scranton civic affairs as well as state and national politics until his death in 2000. He was particularly active in the fight against legalized abortion, and was also a proponent of mother-child health, and the donation and transplantation of human organs, having himself been the recipient of a highly publicized heart and liver transplant in 1993.

  • Documentation of Accomplishments, 1987-1994.
    • Appointments and Promotions of Minorities and Women to Pay Group Nine and Above During the Casey Administration, January 1, 1987 to September 30, 1994.
    • Executive Order 1987-18, Minority and Women Business Enterprise, September 28, 1987.
    • Executive Order 1990-2, Bureau of Women's Business Development, April 13, 1990.
  • Maternal-Child Health Outreach Program Records, 1991-1995.

Manuscript Group 409
Oral History Collection

Microfilmed

The Oral History Collection consists of taped interviews conducted throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by staff members and Friends of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. These interviews shed light on the common folk and their backgrounds as southern born African American migrants, European immigrants, Hispanics, Jews working in the coal, steel, and electrical industries.

  • Oral Histories:
    • Central Pennsylvania Project / Penn State Capitol Campus Project – Black Women
    • Central Pennsylvania Project / Penn State Capitol Campus Project
    • Chester Oral History Project: Black Experience
    • Harrisburg Jews/Chisuk Emuna Project
    • Lancaster Oral History Project: The Greek Community
    • Military Nurses Project
    • Nanticoke Women Oral History Project
    • 2nd Nanticoke Oral History Project
    • Pennsylvania Migrant Farm Labor Project
    • Pennsylvania’s New Deal Project
    • Philadelphia Puerto Rican Project
    • WPA in PA

Manuscript Group 420
John W. Harper Collection
Microfilmed

A native of Bellefonte, John W. Harper was an avid genealogist and a descendant of Germans who traveled down the Schohane into Pennsylvania. As a genealogist, Harper collected a large number of materials pertaining to early Pennsylvania history which his hairs donated to the Pennsylvania State Archives in 1989.

The collection includes both printed and handwritten taufschein (German birth certificates), surveys, deeds, patents,and other papers pertaining to John W. Harper's ancestors and to Centre County, Pennsylvania. Also included are copies of ship's passenger lists, wills, and other genealogical materials.

  • Indenture
    • Indenture of "Negress" Dinah to Nicholas Young, Philadelphia County, March 2, 1795

Manuscript Group 437
Karl Arndt Collection of Harmony Society Materials
Microfilmed

Karl J.R. Arndt (1905 - 1991) was a scholar of utopian societies, a linguist, and Head of the Department of German at Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts. These materials were collected by Dr. Arndt during the course of his research and publication of documentary histories of the Harmony Society (1805-1905) of Harmony, Pennsylvania; New Harmony, Indiana; and Economy, Pennsylvania. The members of the Harmony Society, also sometimes called Harmonists, Economites, and Rappists, were religious separatists devoted to communal living. The Society was founded in 1805 by Johann Georg Rapp (1757-1847), a farmer and vinedresser born in Iptigen, Germany. Rapp and his followers believed in refashioning their lives around their vision of what "primitive Christianity" was like during the first centuries of the Christian era. They established their first community called Harmony in the Connoquenessing Valley of Butler County in 1805 in which all property was placed in a common fund and in 1807 the group also adopted celibacy. A small cloth factory was established in 1806 which was followed by a sawmill, tannery, distillery, vineyards, and a two-story hotel.

In 1814, the Society sold the property in Butler County and founded New Harmony in Posey County, Indiana where they erected even larger factories. In 1824 the members returned to western Pennsylvania and established the village of Economy in Beaver County where Rapp died in 1847. Under the trusteeship of Romelius L. Baker (1847-1868) and Jacob Henrici (1868-1892), the Society became involved in real estate speculation in Beaver Falls, construction of the Pittsburgh and Lake Erie Railroad, established the Economy Savings Institution and Economy Brick Works, and operated the Economy Oil Company, Economy Planing Mill, and Economy Lumber Company. Following litigation by heirs, the Harmony Society was dissolved in 1905 and seventeen structures comprising Old Economy Village were acquired by the Pennsylvania Historical Commission in 1919 for use as a historic site. Most of the archival records thereafter came into the possession of John S, Duss and Susanna C. Duss, the last trustees and were employed by John Duss to write The Harmonists: A Personal History (1943). The Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania took custody of part of the records in 1931 and 1933 and the balance were sold to the Pennsylvania Historical Commission in 1937. The majority of the materials in this collection were obtained by Dr. Arndt through a series of interlibrary loans, 1941-43, from the Old Economy Village historic site while the remainder was collected independently by Dr. Arndt.

The collection consists primarily of original administrative and legal papers, correspondence and accounts of the Harmony Society and its business enterprises. In addition, there are related materials interfiled in the collection which were by collected by Dr. Arndt from unidentified sources. These materials have all been transferred to the PHMC's Old Economy Village Historic Site, but microfilm copies of the materials can be viewed at the Pennsylvania State Archives.

  • Administrative Files
    • Copies of the Articles of Association of the Harmony Society
    • Appointment Letters
    • Resignation Letters
    • Dissolution Agreement for the Society in 1905
  • Legal Files
    • Acts
    • Agreements
    • Divorce Papers pertaining to Christoph Mohl, 1807, 1824, 1831, 1849.
    • Guardianship Papers of Barbara, Godfray, and Theophilus Lively, December 26, 1808.
    • Indentures of Servitude for Gotlieb Napper (Knapper), (October 22, 1804) and for Henry and Elisabeth Knapper (January 16, 1818).
    • Judgments
    • Widow's Application of Caroline Duss, widow of Civil War veteran John Rutz (Duss), for an additional bounty
    • Wills and Estate Papers, including certified copies of the wills of Susannah E. Crees of Beaver County (1897), Jacob Fruit of Beaver County (1875),
    • William T. Henrici of Beaver County (1877), Mary Elizabeth Creese Spitzer of Marengo County, Illinois (1901), and Henry Sybert of Lancaster County (1806).
  • Correspondence

Manuscript Group 447
Landis Valley Farm Museum Collection, [ca. 1749-1982]

In 1790, Pennsylvania Germans made up forty percent of the population of Southeastern Pennsylvania. The immigrants and their descendants established a distinct culture with folk traditions, decorative arts, and a language (Pennsylvania German) based upon their German heritage. Over ninety percent of the German immigrants were farmers. Henry and George Landis grew up with this strong Pennsylvania farming heritage. Their ancestors had settled in Lancaster County during the early 1700s and the brothers recognized that the material culture of the rural Germans was eroding. This inspired them to start collecting objects used by 1700s and 1800s farm families and craftsman. Eventually the collection came to encompass over 75,000 artifacts including furniture, guns, pottery, textiles, and farm equipment. In 1925 the Landis brothers opened a museum on the grounds of their Landis Valley homestead in order to share their collection with the public. The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania acquired the museum as a gift in 1953 and it is now administered by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Among the documents included in the collection is a school attendance record titled, "Philip Krantz's School List at Rabbit Hill School House in Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania from August 31, 1846, [and from] December 1, 1846." It is on a single sheet of paper 12.5"x16", and lists about sixty children and the frequency of their attendance. The attendance record is significant because it sketches a picture of a local Pennsylvania German schoolhouse during the mid-nineteenth century. The collections are located at the Landis Valley Museum, 2451 Kissel Hill Road, Lancaster, 17601. The records are currently unprocessed and inquiries should be direct to the Site Administrator or the Curator.

  • Collections
    • Includes items pertaining to Pennsylvania German women and families.

    Manuscript Group 452
    Pennsylvania Elected Women's Association Records

    The Pennsylvania Elected Women's Association (PEWA) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan network of elected and electable women. Rather than offer support or opposition to a political candidate or party, the PEWA works to expand the potential for women in elected offices. The Association was created in March 1980 at a conference of elected women sponsored by Carlow College. The PEWA aims to provide a better government for all and has established several goals: to increase effectiveness among elected women; to provide resource and information sharing about campaigns, process of government, and the complexities of community management; to increase participation by women in the political process and community affairs; and to achieve greater cooperation and closer communications.

    • Annual Meeting Minutes Bylaws, June 1, 1985
    • Correspondence
    • Financial Statements
    • Gender Balance Bill H.B. 1286 Pamphlets
    • National Directory of Women Elected Officials, 1985
    • Newspaper Articles
    • President's Book, 1986-1987 containing:
      • Correspondence
      • Membership Information
      • Minutes/Agenda
      • Newsletters
      • Treasurer's Reports
    • Treasurer's Reports
    • Women's Significance in Pennsylvania's Economic Growth Fact book,1989

    Manuscript Group 481
    Records of the
    Pennsylvania Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs

    The Pennsylvania Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs is one of the charter members of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., which was founded in 1919. Business and Professional Women's Clubs promote legislation and public policy issues of concern to working women and provide a variety of services and training to their members. In May 1918 the War Department invited two representatives from each state to meet in New York to plan for a national business women's committee. Lena Madison Phillips was elected as executive secretary of this group. Though the war ended, funding was nonetheless granted and in July 1919 the first National Convention was held in St. Louis, Missouri where the National Federation was established. The new Federation sponsored the first national survey of business and professional women and their status, opportunities and qualifications. The Federation established scholarship funds in professional schools, was the first women's organization to present a legislative tax bill to congress, and began publishing the magazine Independent Women. BPW was influential in passing child labor laws and in 1928 established the first "National Women's Business Week." In 1937, the BPW endorsed passage of an equal rights amendment and during the Second World War supported the establishment of women's branches in the service. During the 1960s, BPW led the fight for the Equal Pay Act, and in the 1970s also fought for passage of Title IX, equity in education and credit, prohibition of sexual harassment, and the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).

    Currently comprised of over 70,000 members, the national organization has 3,000 local organizations operating in 53 state federations, including every state plus the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Over the past decade, it has been dedicated to economic empowerment, women's health, family and medical leave rights, pay equity, dependent care and insurance reform.

    The National Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs' affiliate, the BPW Foundation, was founded in 1956 as a non-profit research and education organization and makes available, through the support of private and corporate donors, Career Advancement Scholarships for both academic and vocational study for women. Special loan funds have also been established for women students in engineering and business. The Foundation supports research on all aspects of women's workforce participation and maintains the Marguerite Rawalt Resource Center, a library of resource material. BPW/PAC is a political action committee which endorses candidates who support BPW's legislative platform, mission, and objectives.

    These records of the Pennsylvania Federation include correspondence files, minutes, ca. 1988-1998; a 2001 Convention Program agenda; a 2001 program pamphlet; issues of The Key for September 2001, December 2001, and April 2002; a membership directory, 1988; and chapter histories on 16 rolls of 16mm microfilm negatives.

    • Annual Audits, 1949-1995
    • Annual Convention Agenda Packets, 1937-1986
    • Board Minutes, 1919-1991
    • Federation Manual
      • (mimeographed) 1957
    • Federation Manual
      • (original) 1960 and 1970
    • Newsletter
      • The Key, 1924-2001 (not inclusive)
    • BPW Charter Members
    • Surrendered Chapter Charters
    • PA Federation Seminar - 1980
    • BPW Collars

    Manuscript Group 494
    C. DeLores Tucker Papers

    Dr. C. DeLores Tucker (1927-2005) served as Pennsylvania's Secretary of State from 1971-1977. During her tenure, she chaired the Commission on Charitable Organizations, which formulated and achieved passage of a strong solicitation of Charitable Funds Act that stiffened standards and increased the registration of charities from 400 to 8,000 and doubled the number of investigations and hearings. As Chief Election Officer of the Commonwealth, she instituted the first computerized candidate filing system in the nation, and as Chief Registration Officer, also initiated computerization of the Corporation Bureau. She later served as president of the Bethune DuBois Fund, Inc. which she founded in 1991, and was the convening founder of the National Political Congress of Black Women, Inc. of which she served as chair from 1992. Dr. Tucker also served as chair of the Democratic National Committee Black Caucus, was the founding president of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Association for Non-Violent Change, and launched a historical publication entitled Vital Issues: The Journal of African-American Speeches.

    During her tenure as Secretary of State, she instituted the first Commission on the Status of Women in Pennsylvania and was responsible for the Governor's appointment of more women and minorities to Boards and Commissions, and more women judges, than in the history of the Commonwealth up to that time. She also led the effort to make Pennsylvania one of the first states to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. As a member of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. Tucker organized a woman's caucus and served on a Charter Commission to ensure that all women had a fair share representation at all levels of the Democratic Party. Dr. Tucker's civic and political activities included her participation with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in the Selma to Montgomery march in 1965. She was also a delegate to the historic White House Conference on Civil Rights in 1962. The more than three hundred awards with which she was honored during her lifetime included the Philadelphia Urban League Whitney Young Award (1990), NAACP Thurgood Marshall Award (1982), the NAACP Freedom Fund Award, Ebony Magazine's "100 Most Influential Black Americans" (1972-1977), Ladies Home Journal Nominee for Woman of the Year (1975, 1976), and the B'nai Birith Community Service Award. She was also named by the National Women's Political Caucus and Redbook Magazine as the woman best qualified to be Ambassador to the United Nations.

    She attended both Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania-Wharton School, and received two honorary Doctor of Laws degrees from Morris College in Alabama and Villa Maria College in Pennsylvania. The first African American Secretary of State in the nation, she championed the Pennsylvania Equal Rights Amendment and policies on affirmative action, voter registration by mail, and lowering the voting age to 18. She also spearheaded the creation of the Commission on the Status of Women and led a crusade critical of the music industry for promoting lyrics that were demeaning to women, African Americans, and children.

    Materials in the C. DeLores Tucker Papers include speeches, photograph albums, loose photos, news clippings, scrapbooks, publications, obituaries, and files kept by Tucker on the Bethune-DuBois Institute, the National Congress of Black Women, and "Gangsta Rap" music.

    • Photos
    • Scrapbooks
    • National Congress of Black Women Files
    • Miscellaneous Papers

    Manuscript Group 495
    Landis Family Papers

    Landis Valley Museum is located at 2451 Kissel Hill Road - Lancaster, PA 17601. To view these records contact the Site Administrator at 717-569-0401. Originally created as a private museum during the 1930s by brothers Henry Kinzer Landis and George Diller Landis who were noted collectors, the Farm Museum was eventually acquired by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission in 1953. In the words of Henry K. Landis penned in 1941, "...Here we find tools, artifacts, implements, vehicles, things actually made and used by the early inhabitants, presented for study rather than entertainment. Although there is much to amaze and surprise the novice, study and research is preferred." This is accomplished through preservation and interpretation of the largest collection of Pennsylvania German agricultural artifacts in the country and through the demonstration of: authentic traditional farming techniques, portrayals of rural village and industrial life, skilled craft demonstrations, and the maintenance of historical breeds of animals, and historical plants. Landis Valley Museum is, today, a nationally recognized living history museum that collects, conserves, exhibits, and interprets Pennsylvania German material culture and heritage from the period 1740 through 1940.

    • Papers of Nettie May Landis

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Record Group Index

    • African American Women
      • RG 1
        • Glass Lantern Slides of Pennsylvania Market Houses, 1920. {#1.9}
      • RG 2   
        • Index to Churches and Beneficial Societies, 1831. {Series #2.16}
      • RG 7
        • House File, 1790-1903. {Series #7.11}
      • RG 10
        • Robert P. Casey Issues File, 1987-1994. {Series #10.3}
        • Bureau of Affirmative Action, Commonwealth Agency Files, 1972-1987. {Series #10.23}
        • General Subject File, 1970-1985. {Series #10.24}
      • RG 11
        • Migrant Health Program Patient Files, 1963-1988. {Series #11.31}
      • RG 13
        • Administrative and Public Relations File of Research Assistants, 1942-1946. {Series #13.99}
      • RG 15,
        • General Correspondence, 1958, 1963, 1965, 1967-1974. {Series #15.2}
        • News Clipping File, 1973-1978. {Series #15.5}
      • RG 16
        • Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Labor and Industry, 1913-1916.{Series #16.1}
        • Biannual Report of the Bureau of Rehabilitation, 1921-1922. {Series #16.17}
      • RG 26
        • Charter Books, 1812-1875, {Series #26.108}
      • RG 30
        • Ku Klux Klan General Files 1923-1940. {Series #30.18}
      • RG 33
        • Writs of Habeas Corpus for Black Slaves and Indentured Servants, 1784-1787.{Series #33.119}
      • RG 47
        • Birth Returns and Other Records for Negroes and Mulattos, 1785, 1788-1826, 1830. {Series #47.119}
      • RG 57
        • Cheyney University Catalogs, 1975-1987. (Microfilm roll 5378) {Series #57.9}
        • Cheyney University, The Record, 1979-1988. (Microfilm roll 5379) {Series #57.10}
        • Cheyney University Yearbooks, 1939-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 4630-4632) {Series #57.11}
    • Female Prisoners
      • RG 15
        • General Correspondence, 1958, 1963, 1965, 1967-1974. {Series #15.2}
        • News Clipping File, 1973-1978. {Series #15.5}
    • First Wave Feminism and Suffrage
      • RG 26
        • Charter Books, 1812-1875, {Series #26.108}
        • Bonds, Assignments, Contracts, Acts, Titles and Other Miscellaneous Documents From the Safe of Room 309, 1775-1949. {Series #26.43}
        • Records in the Secretary's Office as surveyed by the CWA Project, December 1933 to February 1934 (microfilm)
      • RG 28
        • "Mothers' Pension" Account Books, 1913-1917. {Series #28.62}
      • RG 47
        • Married Women to Secure their Separate Earnings- Bradford County, March 19, 1873-June 13, 1891. {#47.16}
        • Book of Laws, 1913, Allegheny County . {Series #47.200}
        • Petitions of Married Women to get their Separate Earnings, 1875-1887, Erie County. {#47.219}
        • Charters, 1838, 1855-1856, 1860-1861, 1864-1877, 1879-1883, 1887-1901, 1903-1909, 1927, 1938, 1940-1966, Lehigh County {#47.218}
    • Latina Women
      • RG 34
        • Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community, Subject Files the Executive Director, 1970-1983. {Series #34.11}
    • Motherhood
      • RG 28
        • "Mothers' Pension" Account Books, 1913-1917. {Series #28.62}
    • Native American Women
      • RG 21
        • Minutes of the Provincial Council, 1682-1775. Microfilm Rolls 570-595 {Series #21.8}
        • Commissioners of Indian Trade Accounts, 1758-1766. {Series #21.2}
    • Second Wave Feminism and the Women’s Liberation Movement
      • RG 10
        • Robert P. Casey Issues File, 1987-1994. {Series #10.3}
        • Proclamations, 1987-1995.{Series #10.5}
        • Bureau of Affirmative Action, Commonwealth Agency Files, 1972-1987. {Series #10.23}
        • General Subject File, 1970-1985. {Series #10.24}
        • General File, 1917-1920.{Series #10.31}
        • Scrapbooks, 1917-1920. {Series #10.36}
        • Commission History Files, 1962-1986. {Series #10.46}
        • Correspondence from Readers of Commission Reports and Publications, 1974-1978. {Series #10.47}
        • Newsletters of Women's Organizations, 1972-1985. {Series #10.48}
      • RG 11
        • Quarterly Reports of Abortions Performed, 1974-1979, 1980-1985, {#11.58}
      • RG 15
        • News Clipping File, 1973-1978. {Series #15.5}
        • Speech and Press Release File, 1972-1977. {Series #15.6}
        • State Prisoner Statistical Reports of Weekly Admissions and Discharges, 1953-1962.{Series #15.15}
      • RG 26
        • Federal Campaign Expense Reports for the US House of Representatives, 1972-1981. {Series #26.58}
      • RG 34
        • Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community, Subject Files the Executive Director, 1970-1983. {Series #34.11}
    • Women and Agriculture
      • RG 1
        • Glass Lantern Slides of Pennsylvania Market Houses, 1920. {#1.9}
    • Women and Education
      • RG 2
        • Index to Churches and Beneficial Societies, 1831. {Series #2.16}
      • RG 22
        • Annual Reports of Private Secondary Schools, 1971-1972. {Series #22.8}
        • Annual Reports of Public Secondary Schools, 1971-1972. {Series # 22.10}
        • Higher Education General Information Surveys on College Enrollments, 1960-1971. {Series #22.11}
        • Reports of Degrees and Other Formal Awards Conferred, 1962-1965, 1968-1972. {Series #22.14}
        • Directories and Reports of the Vocational Education Management Information System, 1970-1979. {Series #22.15}
        • Administrative Correspondence, 1972-1978.{Series #22.16}
        • Committee Studies, 1969-1976. {Series #22.17}
        • Minutes of the Board of Normal School Principals, 1920-1931.{Series #22.18}
        • Minutes of the Board of Presidents of State Teachers' Colleges, 1931-1977. {Series #22.19}
        • Minutes of the Board of State College and University Directors, 1971-1975. {Series #22.20}
        • Minutes of the Board of Trustees of State Colleges and the State University, 1954-1965, 1971-1977. {Series #22.21}
        • Specialized Correspondence, 1965-1977. {Series #22.22}
        • Records of Equal Rights Program Activities, 1965-1977. {Series #22.24}
        • State Board of Censors Applications for Examination, 1915-1951. {Series #22.25}
        • Daily Minutes, 1939-1956. {Series #22.26}
        • General Correspondence, 1924-1956. {Series #22.27}
        • Legal Briefs, 1915-1921, 1928-1940. {Series #22.28}
        • Reports, 1925-1951. {Series #22.29}
        • Rules, Procedures and Forms, 1915-1956. {Series #22.30}
        • Annual Reports of High Schools, 1898-1919. {Series #22.96}
        •  Annual Reports of School Districts
        • , 1897-1919. {Series #22.97}
        • Applications for Teaching Certificates, 1866-1922. {Series #22.98}
        • Correspondence of the Postwar Education Committee of the State Council of Education and the Postwar Planning Commission, 1943-1947.{Series #22.99}
        • Minute Books of the State Board of Education, 1911-1920. {Series #22.105}
        • Minutes, Correspondence, and Exhibits Relating to the Investigation of the Department of Public Instruction by the Joint Legislative Committee on Finances, 1932-1934. {Series #22.106}
        • Miscellaneous Reports, 1955-1971. {Series #22.109}
        • Records Examinations for Permanent Certificates, 1897-1919. {Series #22.113}
        • Twenty Five Year Reports of County and District Superintendents, 1900-1925. {Series #22.121}
      • RG 26
        • Index of Academies, Colleges and Female Seminaries, undated. {Series #26.115}
      • RG 47
        • Charters, 1838, 1855-1856, 1860-1861, 1864-1877, 1879-1883, 1887-1901, 1903-1909, 1927, 1938, 1940-1966, Lehigh County {#47.218}
      • RG 57
        • Bloomsburg University Board of Trustees Minutes, 1927-1967. (microfilm rolls # 5047-5044) {Series #57.1}
        • Bloomsburg University Catalogs, 1867-1980. (Microfilm rolls # 5228-5239) {Series #57.2}
        • Bloomsburg University Faculty Government Minutes, 1970-1985. (Microfilm roll 5075) {Series #57.3}
        • Bloomsburg University Student Government Council Minutes, 1945-1982. (Microfilm roll 5072-5073) {Series #57.4}
        • Bloomsburg University Yearbooks, 1915-1987. (Microfilm roll 5209-5211) {Series #57.5}
        • California University of PA Board of Trustee Minutes, 1910-1984. (Microfilm roll 5049-5055) {Series #57.6}
        • California University of PA Yearbooks and Yearbook in Review, 1913-1917, 1919-1920, 1929. (Microfilm rolls # 5251-5265, 5418) {Series #57.7}
        • California University of PA Catalogs, 1869-1973. (Microfilm rolls # 5240-5249) {Series #57.8}
        • Cheyney University Catalogs, 1975-1987. (Microfilm roll 5378) {Series #57.9}
        • Cheyney University, The Record, 1979-1988. (Microfilm roll 5379) {Series #57.10}
        • Cheyney University Yearbooks, 1939-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 4630-4632) {Series #57.11}
        • Clarion University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1886-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5064-5078) {Series #57.12}
        • Clarion University Catalogs, 1889-1957. (Microfilm rolls # 5393-5399) {Series #57.13}
        • Clarion University College Pathfinder (Student Yearbook), 1975-1987. (Microfilm roll 5382) {Series #57.14}
        • Clarion University Faculty Forum Minutes, 1976-1988. (Microfilm roll 5056) {Series #57.15}
        • Clarion University Faculty Senate Minutes, 1960-1982, 1988. (Microfilm roll 5057-5059) {Series #57.16}
        • Clarion University Graduate Catalogs, 1969-1989. (Microfilm roll 5380) {Series #57.17}
        • Clarion University Student Senate Minutes, 1942-1988. (Microfilm roll 5060-5063) {Series #57.18}
        • Clarion University Summer Catalogs, 1958-1978. (Microfilm roll 5381) {Series #57.19}
        • Clarion University Yearbooks, 1909-1987. (Microfilm roll 5383-5391) {Series #57.20}
        • East Stroudsburg University Catalogs, 1921-1922, 1931-1932, 1939-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5280-5301) {Series #57.21}
        • East Stroudsburg University Yearbooks, 1915-1982. (Microfilm rolls # 5266-5279) {Series #57.22}
        • Edinboro University Catalogs, 1870-1871, 1896-1898, 1923-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5302-5316) {Series #57.23}
        • Indiana University of PA Scrapbooks, 1940-1975. (Microfilm rolls # 5400-5416) {Series #57.24}
        • Kutztown University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1866-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5082-5088) {Series #57.25}
        • Kutztown University Catalogs, 1866-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5317-5330) {Series #57.26}
        • Kutztown University Faculty Senate Minutes, 1964-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5089-5104) {Series #57.27}
        • Kutztown University Student Government Board Minutes, 1977-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5105-5108) {Series #57.28}
        • Kutztown University, The Key-Student Handbooks, 1936-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5348-5354) {Series #57.29}
        • Kutztown University Yearbooks, 1911-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5331-5347) {Series #57.30}
        • Lock Haven University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1914-1984. (Microfilm rolls # 5076-5080) {Series #57.31}
        • Lock Haven University Bulletins and Catalogs, 1878-1897, 1911-1970. (Microfilm rolls # 5420-5424) {Series #57.32}
        • Lock Haven University Yearbooks, 1913-1985. (Microfilm rolls # 5425-5431) {Series #57.33}
        • Mansfield University Catalogs, 1864-1865, 1893-1896, 1911-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5372-5377) {Series #57.34}
        • Mansfield University Faculty Advisory Council Minutes, 1966-1967, 1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5109) {Series #57.35}
        • Mansfield University Treasurer's Minutes, 1955-1959. (Microfilm rolls # 5081) {Series #57.36}
        • Mansfield University Yearbooks, 1918-1986. (Microfilm rolls # 5357-5371) {Series #57.37}
        • Shippensburg University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1929-1982. (Microfilm rolls # 5110-5112) {Series #57.38}
        • Slippery Rock University Academic Forum Agenda/Minutes, 1966-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5118-5119) {Series #57.39}
        • Slippery Rock University Alumni News, 1945-1971. (Microfilm rolls # 5446) {Series #57.40}
        • Slippery Rock University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1968-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5113-5117) {Series #57.41}
        • Slippery Rock University Catalogs and Bulletins, 1889-1907, 1914-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5432-5439) {Series #57.42}
        • Slippery Rock University, Ginger Hill, 1956-1988. (Microfilm rolls # 5447-5448) {Series #57.43}
        • Slippery Rock University Yearbooks, 1898-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5440-5445) {Series #57.44}
        • West Chester University Board of Trustee Minutes, 1869-1890, 1919-1981. (Microfilm rolls # 5120-5130) {Series #57.45}
        • West Chester University Catalogs, 1871-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5470-5486) {Series #57.46}
        • West Chester University School Newspaper, 1924-1989. (Microfilm rolls # 5449-5454) {Series #57.47}
        • West Chester University Yearbooks, 1910-1987. (Microfilm rolls # 5455-5469) {Series #57.48}
    • Women and Government/Politics
      • RG 13
        • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Executive Director, 1945-1988. {#13.1}
      • RG 26
        • Federal Campaign Expense Reports for the US House of Representatives, 1972-1981. {Series #26.58}
        • General Election Statistical Files, 1960-1984. {Series #26.60}
        • Registration Figures, 1950, 1960, 1964, 1966, 1967-1972. (1 microfilm roll) roll #3826 {Series #26.81}
    • Women and Health
      • RG 11
        • Legal Opinions, 1920-1965. {Series #11.2}
        • Reports, 1886-1987. {Series #11.15}
        • Prenatal Care and Pregnancy Evaluation Reports, 1974-1980. {Series #11.17}
        • State HIV Planning Council Minutes, 1991-1993. {Series #11.24}
        • Migrant Health Program Patient Files, 1963-1988. {Series #11.31}
      • RG 16
        • Selected Readings on Occupational Diseases, [ca. 1940]. {Series #16.34}
      • RG 23
        • Administrative Correspondence, 1963, 1969-1970. {Series #23.1}
        • Correspondence Relating to Birth Control and Planned Parenthood, 1958-1959. {Series #23.2}
        • News Releases, 1955-1964, 1972-1974. {Series #23.4}
        • Speeches, 1955-1962. (2 folders) {Series #23.5}
        • State Institution Files, 1959-1971. {Series #23.6}
        • State Supervised Hospitals' History File, 1914-1973. {Series #23.10}
        • Alphabetical Register of Female Patients, [ca. 1886-1926] {Series #23.16}
        • Daily Report Books of Male and Female Wards, 1879-1956. {Series #23.21}
        • Female Attendants' Payroll Books, 1890-1917. {Series #23.23}
        • Female Admission Registers, 1884-1923. {Series #23.24}
        • Record Book of Female and Male Epileptics, 1887-1891. {Series #23.44}
        • Women Nurses' Payroll Book, 1917-1923. {Series #23.48}
        • Day and Night Report Books, 1936-1937. {Series #23.71}
        • Female Patients' Clothing and Property Book, 1890-1903. {Series #23.83}
        • Hydro-Therapy Reports, 1913-1923. {Series #23.91}
        • Minutes of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors, 1885-1945. {Series #23.104}
        • Record of Condition of Female Patients When Received, 1876-1904. {Series #23.119}
        • Superintendent's Reports, 1928-1932. {Series #23.126}
        • Account of Clothing Issued to Female Patients, 1851-1862. {Series #23.136}
        • Annual Reports of the Harrisburg State Hospital, 1851-1921. {Series #23.145}
        • Daily Registers, 1851-1969. {Series #23.156}
        • Electroshock Treatment Record Book, [ca. 1941-1958]. {Series #23.158}
        • Ledger of Patient Accounts, 1851-1866. {Series #23.172}
        • Medical Case Book, 1851-1867. {Series #23.177}
        • Medical Case Books of the Female Department, 1880-1922. {Series #23.178}
        • Medical Journals, 1922-1936. {Series #23.180}
        • Register of Female Patients, 1852-1884. {Series #23.198}
        • Admission Book of the Insane Department of the Pittsburgh North Side City Home, 1911-1916. {Series #23.232}
        • Admission Registers, 1925-1941. {Series #23.233}
        • Alms House Registers, 1876-1884. {Series #23.234}
        • Case Book of Allegheny City Farm, 1884-1887. {Series #23.236}
        • Case Books of Pittsburgh City Home and Hospital, 1879-1912. {Series #23.237}
        • Patient History Books, 1879-1884. {Series #23.239}
        • Register of Discharges and Deaths, 1950-1958. {Series #23.240}
        • Annual Reports of the Committee on Lunacy, 1885, 1887-1890. {Series #23.244}
        • Annual Reports of the Norristown State Hospital, 1882-1959. {Series #23.245}
        • Audio Tapes and Motion Picture Films, 1961-1962, 1968. {Series #23.248}
        • Daily Register of Admissions, Visits, Deaths and Discharged Female Patients, 1938-1940. {Series #23.253}
        • Index of 1,180 Post Mortems of the Insane, 1938-1940. {Series #23.255}
        • Death Registers of Females, 1909-1942. {Series #23.276}
        • Discharge Registers of Females, 1907-1942. {Series #23.278}
        • General Registers of Female Patients, 1895-1908, 1920-1939. {Series #23.280}
        • Patient Characteristics and Statistical Register Book, 1940-1942. {Series #23.284}
        • Admission Registers, 1900-1980. {Series #23.288}
        • Female Admission Books, 1883-1910. {Series #23.303}
        • Female Case Books, [ca. 1883-1913.] {Series #23.304}
        • Index to Female Case Books, [ca. 1883-1913]. (1 volume) {Series #23.306}
        • Public Information Motion Picture Films, 1948-1976. {Series #23.340}
        • Miscellaneous Manuals, Reports and Related Printed Materials, 1934-1967. {Series #23.344}
        • Institutional Population Records, [ca. 1882-1920]. {Series #23.345}
        • Records of Admissions, Discharges and Deaths at State Institutions, [ca. 1882-1920]. {Series #23.348}
        • Administrative File of the Secretary of Welfare, 1955-1958. {Series #23.349}
        • Reports on County Poor Relief, 1932-1939. {Series #23.353}
        • Reports, 1937-1938. (3 volumes) {Series #23.370}
        • Correspondence with Dr. Henry I. Klopp, Superintendent of the State Homeopathic Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania, 1912-1922. {Series #23.372}
        • Miscellaneous Large Photographs, undated. {Series #23.419}
    • Women and Law
      • RG 7
        • Committee Book, 1785. {Series #7.1}
        • Minute Books, 1779-1781, 1783-1784, 1788. {Series #7.2}
        • Committee Bills, 1971-1972, 1977-1978. {Series #7.4}
        • Committee Books, 1790-1819. {Series #7.5}
        • Committee Hearing Transcripts, Testimony and Reports, 1965-1974. {Series #7.6}
        • Committee Minutes, 1945-1978. {Series #7.7}
        • Dead Bills, 1965, 1973-1976, 1979-1980.{Series #7.8}
        • History of House Bills and Resolutions, 1953, 1959, 1962-1964, 1971-1972. {Series #7.9}
        • House and Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1971-1978. {Series #7.10}
        • House File, 1790-1903. {Series #7.11}
        • Journals, 1791-1810, 1959-1962, 1969-1978. {Series #7.12}
        • Legislative Journal Papers, 1974-1978. {Series #7.13}
        • Minute Books, 1797-1798, 1813-1814, 1821-1822, 1856, 1957-1980. {Series #7.14}
        • Official Bills of the House of Representatives, 1971-1980. {Series #7.16}
        • Official Resolutions, Senate Bills and Governors' Messages, 1979-1980.{Series #7.17}
        • Record of Action on Bills in the House, 1881. {Series #7.18}
        • Records of Citations, 1969-1970, 1973-1974.) {Series #7.19}
        • Record of House and Senate Bills, Veto Bills, and Messages Remaining on the Table, 1980. {Series #7.20}
        • Committee Hearing Transcripts, Testimony and Reports, 1855, 1872, 1915, 1933, 1940-1941, 1955-1956, 1959-1961, 1963, 1965-1985. {Series #7.29}
        • Committee Books, 1810-1850, 1897-1899. Microfilm Rolls 3513-3514 for the period up to 1850. {Series #7.38}
        • House Resolutions in the Senate, 1969-1972. {Series #7.46}
        • History Ledgers of House and Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1905-1909, 1932. {Series #7.47} \
        • History of Senate Bills and Resolutions, 1953, 1959, 1961-1962, 1964, 1971-1972. {Series #7.48}
      • RG 11
        • Legal Opinions, 1920-1965. {Series #11.2}
      •  RG 16
        • Annual Reports of the Factory Inspector, 1890, 1892-1897, 1899-1911. {Series #16.2}
        • Biennial Report of the Department of Labor and Industry, 1919-1920. {Series 16.3}
        • Reports and Related Records, 1919-1927. {Series #16.4}
        • Legal Files, 1937-1968. {Series #16.37}
        • Legislative Voting Records, 1911-1936. {Series #16.46}
      • RG 21
        • Miscellaneous Papers, 1664-1775. {Series #21.9}
      • RG 26
        • Bonds, Assignments, Contracts, Acts, Titles and Other Miscellaneous Documents from the Safe of Room 309, 1775-1949. {Series #26.43}
      • RG 27
        • Executive Correspondence and Petitions, 1775-1776 and undated. {Series #27.2}
        • Accounts, 1776-1777 and undated. {Series #27.7}
        • Executive Correspondence and Petitions, 1777-1790 & undated. {Series #27.28}
        • Executive Correspondence, 1776-1777 & undated. {Series #27.8}
        • Minute Books, 1776-1777. {Series #27.9}
        • Minute Book, 1777. {Series #27.15}
      • RG 28
        • "Mothers' Pension" Account Books, 1913-1917. {Series #28.62}
      • RG 33
        • Affidavits, 1770-1806. {Series #33.4}
        • Agreements, 1783-1811, 1814 & undated. {Series #33.6}
        • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1961-1963, 1971-1984. {Series #33.7}
        • Allocatur Dockets, 1924-1954, 1971-1999. {Series #33.8}
        • Amicable Actions Papers, 1782-1809. {Series #33.9}
        • Appearance and Continuance Dockets, 1740-1795.{Series #33.11}
        • Appearance Dockets, 1795-1829, 1838-1953, 1965. {Series #33.12}
        • Appearance Papers, 1858-1879. {Series #33.13}
        • Bundles of Miscellaneous Court Papers With Index, 1790-1883. {Series #33.23}
        • Cases Stated File, 1783-1793 & undated. {Series #33.25}
        • Certiorari and Habeas Corpus Papers, 1753-1775, 1777-1787. {Series #33.26}
        • Claims Docket, 1778-1779. {Series #33.28}
        • Declarations, 1749-1802 & undated. {Series #33.34}
        • Debit Sans Breve Papers, 1802-1805, 1810-1812. {Series #33.36}
        • Depositions, 1778-1828. {Series #33.37}
        • Discontinuance Papers, 1783-1800. {Series #33.38}
        • Divorce Papers, 1786-1815.{Series #33.41}
        • Equity Dockets, 1837-1874. {Series #33.43}
        • Equity Papers, 1836-1875, 1877, 1880. {Series #33.44}
        • Escheat Papers, 1796-1822. {Series #33.45}
        • General Motion and Divorce Docket, 1750-1837 (Divorces 1800-1805 only). {Series #33.52}
        • Interrogatories, [ca. 1787-1827]. {Series #33.56}
        • Journals, 1895-1898. {Series #33.57}
        • Judgment Dockets, 1756-1896. {Series #33.58}
        • Minute Books, 1806-1816, 1819-1952. {Series #33.64}
        • Minutes, 1788, 1793, 1795-1800, 1802-1804. {Series #33.65}
        • Miscellaneous Case Papers, 1810-1813. {Series #33.66}
        • Miscellaneous Records of the Supreme Court of Nisi Prius, [ca. 1770-1800]. {Series #33.69}
        • Motions and Rules, 1789-1829. {Series #33.73}
        • Opinions, 1842-1949. {Series #33.78}
        • Perpetuation of Testimony Dockets, 1781-1801. {Series #33.84}
        • Petitions, 1781-1815.{Series #33.85}
        • Petitions,1793-1818. {Series #33.91}
        • Settlement of Accounts Case Papers, 1776-1804. {Series #33.103}
        • Verdict Papers, 1804-1812 & undated. {Series #33.114}
        • Writs of Habeas Corpus and Petitions, 1771-1863. {Series #33.118}
        • Writs of Habeas Corpus for Black Slaves and Indentured Servants, 1784-1787.{Series #33.119}
        • Writs of Inquiry, 1780-1826. {Series #33.120}
        • Court Papers, 1757-1761, 1763, 1765-1766, 1778-1782, 1786-1787. {Series #33.126}
        • General Gaol Delivery Dockets, 1778-1828. {Series #33.127}
        • Minutesand Writs of the High Court of Errors and Appeals, 1780-1808. {Series #33.128}
        • Allocatur Dockets, 1967-1999. {Series #33.181}
        • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1961-1986. {Series #33.132}
        • Dockets, Including Lancaster and Chambersburg District Dockets, 1800-1961 {Series #33.140}
        • General Correspondence, 1810-1964. {Series #33.141}
        • Judgments Entered and Opinions Filed, 1954-1960. {Series #33.142}
        • Miscellaneous Court Records Including Histories and Rule Book, 1848-1949. {Series #33.145}
        • Opinion Papers, 1810-1965. {Series #33.151}
        • Allocatur Docket Papers, 1971-1979. {Series #33.161}
        • Allocatur Dockets, 1987-1999. {Series #33.186}
        • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1892-1980. {Series #33.168}
        • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1892-1966, 1987-1999. {Series #33.169}
        • Miscellaneous Orders-Disbarments, Suspensions, Reinstatements, Amendments to Rules, etc. 1946. {Series #33.188}
        • Miscellaneous Papers, 1799-1908. {Series #33.170}
        • Motion Dockets, 1904-1940. {Series #33.171}
      • RG 38
        • Appeal Papers, 1895-1956. {Series #38.3}
        • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1915-1947. {Series #38.7}
        • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1921-1939. {Series #38.8}
        • Motion Docket Papers, 1916-1917. {Series #38.9}
        • Motion Dockets, 1895-1954. {Series #38.10}
        • Opinions, 1895-1937. {Series #38.11}
        • Allocatur Dockets, 1937-1948. {Series #38.16}
        • General Correspondence, 1907-1964. {Series #38.22}
        • List of Judgments and Opinions Filed, 1951-1953. {Series #38.25}
        • Minute Books, 1895-1965. {Series #38.26}
        • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1955-1986. {Series #38.27}
        • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1937-1978. {Series #38.28}
        •  Motion Dockets, 1936-1940, 1956-1961. {Series #38.29}
        • Opinions, 1896-1923. {Series #38.30}
        • Minute Books, 1896-1938. {Series #38.41}
        • Opinions, 1916-1923. {Series #38.42}
        • Minute Books, 1896-1983. {Series #38.48}
        • Miscellaneous Docket Papers, 1899-1983. {Series #38.49}
        • Miscellaneous Dockets, 1896-1983. {Series #38.50}
      • RG 47
        • Married Women to Secure their Separate Earnings- Bradford County, March 19, 1873-June 13, 1891. {#47.16}
        • Midwife Register, 1921-1924, Dauphin County. {#47.84}
        • Midwife Registration Receipt Book, 1921-1924, Dauphin County. {Series #47.85}
        • Birth Returns and Other Records for Negroes and Mulattos, 1785, 1788-1826, 1830. {Series #47.119}
        • Petitions of Married Women to get their Separate Earnings, 1875-1887, Erie County. {#47.219}
        • Book of Laws, 1913, Allegheny County . {Series #47.200}
        • Charters, 1838, 1855-1856, 1860-1861, 1864-1877, 1879-1883, 1887-1901, 1903-1909, 1927, 1938, 1940-1966, Lehigh County {#47.218}
    • Women and the Media
      • RG 16
        • Motion Picture Films, Including World War Informational Films, [ca. 1941-1943]. {Series #16.14}
      • RG 22
        • State Board of Censors Applications for Examination, 1915-1951. {Series #22.25}
        • Daily Minutes, 1939-1956. {Series #22.26}
        • General Correspondence, 1924-1956. {Series #22.27}
        • Legal Briefs, 1915-1921, 1928-1940. {Series #22.28}
        • Reports, 1925-1951. {Series #22.29}
      • RG 23
        • Public Information Motion Picture Films, 1948-1976. {Series #23.340}
    • Women and the Military and During War
      • RG 10
        • General File, 1917-1920.{Series #10.31}
        • Scrapbooks, 1917-1920. {Series #10.36}
      • RG 13
        • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Executive Director, 1945-1988. {#13.1}
        • Reports, Correspondence, and Research File Relating to the War History Program, 1938-1947. {Series #13.48}
        • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Curators and Directors, 1965-1978. {Series #13.71}
        • Administrative Files of Directors and Assistants, 1923-1944. {Series #13.85}
        • Administrative and Public Relations File of Research Assistants, 1942-1946. {Series #13.99}
      • RG 16
        • Motion Picture Films, Including World War Informational Films, [ca. 1941-1943]. {Series #16.14}
      • RG 19
        • Commissions File, 1861-1929. {Series #19.14}
        • Bonus Administration Files for the Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War and Vietnam War, 1898-1987. {Series #19.221}
    • Women's Organizations and Clubs
      • RG 2
        • Index to Churches and Beneficial Societies, 1831. {Series #2.16}
      • RG 10
        • Commission History Files, 1962-1986. {Series #10.46}
        • Correspondence from Readers of Commission Reports and Publications, 1974-1978. {Series #10.47}
        • Newsletters of Women's Organizations, 1972-1985. {Series #10.48}
      • RG 13
        • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Executive Director, 1945-1988. {#13.1}
        • Reports, Correspondence, and Research File Relating to the War History Program, 1938-1947. {Series #13.48}
        • Administrative and Correspondence Files of the Curators and Directors, 1965-1978. {Series #13.71}
      • RG 25
        • Minutes of the Executive Committee of the Independence Celebration Commission, [ca. 1922-1923]. {Series #25.36}
        • Minutes of the Commission's Executive and Women's Executive Committees, 1938. {Series #25.88}
      • RG 26
        • Charter Books, 1812-1875, {Series #26.108}
      • RG 30
        • Ku Klux Klan General Files 1923-1940. {Series #30.18}
      • RG 47
        • Charters, 1838, 1855-1856, 1860-1861, 1864-1877, 1879-1883, 1887-1901, 1903-1909, 1927, 1938, 1940-1966, Lehigh County {#47.218}
    • Women and Religion
      • RG 2
        • Index to Churches and Beneficial Societies, 1831. {Series #2.16}
      • RG 26
        • Charter Books, 1812-1875, {Series #26.108}
      • RG 47
        • Charters, 1838, 1855-1856, 1860-1861, 1864-1877, 1879-1883, 1887-1901, 1903-1909, 1927, 1938, 1940-1966, Lehigh County {#47.218}
    • Women and Sexuality
      • RG 22
        • State Board of Censors Applications for Examination, 1915-1951. {Series #22.25}
        • Daily Minutes, 1939-1956. {Series #22.26}
        • General Correspondence, 1924-1956. {Series #22.27}
        • Legal Briefs, 1915-1921, 1928-1940. {Series #22.28}
        • Reports, 1925-1951. {Series #22.29}
      • RG 33
        • Divorce Papers, 1786-1815.{Series #33.41}
    • Women and Work/Labor
      • RG 1
        • Glass Lantern Slides of Pennsylvania Market Houses, 1920. {#1.9}
      • RG 7
        • Work Time Book for Cleaning Women, 1919-1923. {Series #7.83}
      • RG 11
        • Migrant Health Program Patient Files, 1963-1988. {Series #11.31}
      • RG 13
        • Administrative and Public Relations File of Research Assistants, 1942-1946. {Series #13.99}
      • RG 16
        • Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Labor and Industry, 1913-1916.{Series #16.1}
        • Annual Reports of the Factory Inspector, 1890, 1892-1897, 1899-1911. {Series #16.2}
        • Biennial Report of the Department of Labor and Industry, 1919-1920. {Series 16.3}
        • Reports and Related Records, 1919-1927. {Series #16.4}
        • Area Labor Market and Manpower Reports and Newsletters, 1954-1967. {Series #16.7}
        • Labor Market Area Reports, 1964-1968. {Series #16.10}
        • Motion Picture Films, Including World War Informational Films, [ca. 1941-1943]. {Series #16.14}
        • Labor Dispute Case Files, 1938-1943, 1951-1953. {Series #16.16}
        • Biannual Report of the Bureau of Rehabilitation, 1921-1922. {Series #16.17}
        • Records of the Governor's Committee on the Employment of the "Handicapped", 1954-1978. {Series #16.18}
        • Accident Prevention and Industrial Hygiene Course Book for State Factory and Building Inspectors, 1937. {Series #16.19}
        • Biennial Report of the Industrial Board, (printed), 1921-1922. {Series #16.20}
        • Departmental Bulletin Books, 1925-1930.{Series #16.21}
        • Monthly Bulletin Books, 1914-1934. {Series #16.28}
        • Monthly Reports of Work Injuries in Pennsylvania, 1972-1975.{Series #16.29}
        • Pennsylvania Labor and Industry Review Books, 1939-1945, 1947-1949. {Series #16.31}
        • Reports File, 1906-1958. {Series #16.32}
        • Selected Readings on Occupational Diseases, [ca. 1940]. {Series #16.34}
        • Special Bulletin Books, 1924-1963. {Series #16.35}
        • Legal Files, 1937-1968. {Series #16.37}
        • Minutes, 1937-1977. {Series #16.38}
        • Digest of the Transactions of the Industrial Board, 1914-1916. {#16.41}
        • Legislative Voting Records, 1911-1936. {Series #16.46}
        • Annual Reports, 1937-2005. {Series #16.47}
      • RG 21
        • Commissioners of Indian Trade Accounts, 1758-1766. {Series #21.2}
      • RG 22
        • Reports of Degrees and Other Formal Awards Conferred, 1962-1965, 1968-1972. {Series #22.14}
        • Directories and Reports of the Vocational Education Management Information System, 1970-1979. {Series #22.15}
        • Applications for Teaching Certificates, 1866-1922. {Series #22.98}
      • RG 23
        • Female Attendants' Payroll Books, 1890-1917. {Series #23.23}
        • Women Nurses' Payroll Book, 1917-1923. {Series #23.48}
      • RG 28
        •  "Mothers' Pension" Account Books, 1913-1917. {Series #28.62}
      • RG 47
        • Married Women to Secure their Separate Earnings- Bradford County, March 19, 1873-June 13, 1891. {#47.16}
        • Midwife Register, 1921-1924, Dauphin County. {#47.84}
        • Midwife Registration Receipt Book, 1921-1924, Dauphin County. {Series #47.85}
        • Petitions of Married Women to get their Separate Earnings, 1875-1887, Erie County. {#47.219}

     

     

     

     

     

    Manuscript Group Index

    • Abolition
      • MG 6, Diaries and Journals Collection, 1763-1938
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
      • MG 150, Henry C. Corbit Collection, 1835-1843
    • African American Women
      • MG 9, Pennsylvania Writers Collection, 1899-1970
      • MG 90, John R. Miller Collection of Cumberland County Government Records, 1768-1914
      • MG 98, Orbison Family Papers, 1750-1902
      • MG 190, James H. Duff Papers, 1943-1951
      • MG 214, Warren J. Harder Collection, 1928-1968
      • MG 215, Ethnic Studies Collections, 1789-1975
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 262, Special Microfilm Collections, [ca. 1620-1975]
      • MG 299, Commonwealth Association of Students Records, 1973-1979
      • MG 404, Dick Thornburgh Papers, 1979-1987
      • MG 406, Robert P. Casey Collection, [ca. 1953-1987]
      • MG 409, Oral History Collection, 1970-2005
      • MG 420, John W. Harper Collection, 1716-1888
      • MG 494, C. Delores Tucker Papers, 1960-2005
    • Domesticity
      • MG 6, Diaries and Journals Collection, 1763-1938
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
      • MG 212, William E. Stewart Collection, [ca. 1861-1946]
      • MG 216, Carlisle Indian School Collection, 1878-1969
    • European Immigrant Women
      • MG 215, Ethnic Studies Collections, 1789-1975
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 262, Special Microfilm Collections, [ca. 1620-1975]
      • MG 297, Mary Sachs Collection, 1929-1970
      • MG 404, Dick Thornburgh Papers, 1979-1987
    • Female Politicians:
      • MG 43, Dock Family Papers, 1865-1951
      • MG 264, International Utilities Political Memorabilia Collection, 1789-1972
      • MG 283, Genevieve Blatt Papers, 1934-1977
      • MG 368, General Assembly Collections, 1798-1996
      • MG 494, C. Delores Tucker Papers, 1960-2005
    • First Wave Feminism and Suffrage
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 43, Dock Family Papers, 1865-1951
      • MG 73, Liliane Stevens Howard Collection, 1915-1959
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
      • MG 150, Henry C. Corbit Collection, 1835-1843
      • MG 368, General Assembly Collections, 1798-1996
    • Latina Women
      • MG 215, Ethnic Studies Collections, 1789-1975
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 262, Special Microfilm Collections, [ca. 1620-1975]
      • MG 409, Oral History Collection, 1970-2005
    • Motherhood
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 216, Carlisle Indian School Collection, 1878-1969
      • MG 368, General Assembly Collections, 1798-1996
      • MG 406, Robert P. Casey Collection, [ca. 1953-1987]
    • Native American Women
      • MG 216, Carlisle Indian School Collection, 1878-1969
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
    • Prominent PA Women
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 43, Dock Family Papers, 1865-1951
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 262, Special Microfilm Collections, [ca. 1620-1975]
      • MG 278, Eunice Mildred McCloskey Collection, 1931-1979
      • MG 283, Genevieve Blatt Papers, 1934-1977
      • MG 317, Mary Barnum Bush Hauck Papers, 1931-1979
      • MG 368, General Assembly Collections, 1798-1996
      • MG 494, C. Delores Tucker Papers, 1960-2005
    • Quaker Women
      • MG 6, Diaries and Journals Collection, 1763-1938
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
    • Representations of Women
      • MG 200, Poster Collection, 1854-1971, and undated
      • MG 212, William E. Stewart Collection, [ca. 1861-1946]
      • MG 213 Postcard Collection, [ca. 1880-1974]
      • MG 214, Warren J. Harder Collection, 1928-1968
    • Second Wave Feminism and the Women’s Liberation Movement
      • MG 100, Pennsylvania Association of Women Deans, Administrators and Counselors Papers, 1922-1984
      • MG 208, William W. Scranton Papers, 1963-1967
      • MG 309, Milton J. Shapp Papers, [ca. 1971-1979]
      • MG 350, American Association of University Women, Pennsylvania Division Records,
      • MG 357, Pennsylvania Women's Legislative Exchange Records, 1968-1981
      • MG 368, General Assembly Collections, 1798-1996
      • MG 404, Dick Thornburgh Papers, 1979-1987
      • MG 481, Records of the Pennsylvania Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., 1919-1990
      • MG 494, C. Delores Tucker Papers, 1960-2005
    • Temperance
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 73, Liliane Stevens Howard Collection, 1915-1959
      • MG 84, McCreath Family Collection. 1836-1892
      • MG 101, Pennsylvania State Temperance Union Papers, 1867-1874
      • MG 143, MG 212, William E. Stewart Collection, [ca. 1861-1946]
    • Women and Education
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 43, Dock Family Papers, 1865-1951
      • MG 73, Liliane Stevens Howard Collection, 1915-1959
      • MG 84, McCreath Family Collection. 1836-1892
      • MG 93, Moore Family Papers, 1749-1934 (bulk 1749-1887)
      • MG 101, Pennsylvania State Temperance Union Papers, 1867-1874
      • MG 133, Welles Family Collection, 1805-1898
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
      • MG 190, James H. Duff Papers, 1943-1951
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 298, Lucille Wilson Collection, 1793-1881, & undated
      • MG 299, Commonwealth Association of Students Records, 1973-1979
      • MG 350, American Association of University Women, Pennsylvania Division Records, 1942-1981
    • Women and Labor
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 9, Pennsylvania Writers Collection, 1899-1970
      • MG 73, Liliane Stevens Howard Collection, 1915-1959
      • MG 184, Reading Labor Advocate Records, 1917-1958
      • MG 216, Carlisle Indian School Collection, 1878-1969
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 262, Special Microfilm Collections, [ca. 1620-1975]
      • MG 368, General Assembly Collections, 1798-1996
      • MG 409, Oral History Collection, 1970-2005
      • MG 420, John W. Harper Collection, 1716-1888
    • Women and Medicine
      • MG 6, Diaries and Journals Collection, 1763-1938
      • MG 98, Orbison Family Papers, 1750-1902
      • MG 200, Poster Collection, 1854-1971, and undated
      • MG 211, Richmond Ladies Soldiers Aid Society Papers, 1861-1865
    • Women and Religion
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 46 Ephrata Cloister Collection, 1723-1951 (bulk 1723-1874)
      • MG 123, Mrs. Elisha D. Swift Papers, 1790-1917 (bulk 1790-1871)
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
      • MG 185, Harmony Society Papers, 1742-1951
      • MG 171, Samuel W. Pennypacker Papers, 1703-1916 (bulk 1851-1916)
      • MG 185, Harmony Society Papers, 1742-1951
      • MG 200, Poster Collection, 1854-1971, and undated
      • MG 215, Ethnic Studies Collections, 1789-1975
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219 Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 351, Julius F. Sachse Deposit of Ephrata Cloister Materials, 1680-1939 (bulk: 1725-1931)
      • MG 354, Old Economy Village Collection, [ca. 1813-1953]
      • MG 437, Karl Arndt Collection of Harmony Society Materials, 1794-1949
    • Women during the Civil War
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 93, Moore Family Papers, 1749-1934 (bulk 1749-1887)
      • MG 98, Orbison Family Papers, 1750-1902
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
    • Women in Agriculture:
      • MG 218, 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 290, Valley Forge Branch of the Woman's National Farm and Garden Association Minute Book, 1931-1941
      • MG 495, Landis Family Papers
    • Women in Business
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 297, Mary Sachs Collection, 1929-1970
      • MG 404, Dick Thornburgh Papers, 1979-1987
      • MG 406, Robert P. Casey Collection, [ca. 1953-1987]
      • MG 481, Records of the Pennsylvania Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., 1919-1990
    • Women in Politics
      • MG 6, Diaries and Journals Collection, 1763-1938
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 43, Dock Family Papers, 1865-1951
      • MG 73, Liliane Stevens Howard Collection, 1915-1959
      • MG 93, Moore Family Papers, 1749-1934 (bulk 1749-1887)
      • MG 101, Pennsylvania State Temperance Union Papers, 1867-1874
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
      • MG 150, Henry C. Corbit Collection, 1835-1843
      • MG 156, Edward Martin Papers, 1866-1967 (bulk 1894-1966)
      • MG 171, Samuel W. Pennypacker Papers, 1703-1916 (bulk 1851-1916)
      • MG 184, Reading Labor Advocate Records, 1917-1958
      • MG 190, James H. Duff Papers, 1943-1951
      • MG 200, Poster Collection, 1854-1971, and undated
      • MG 208, William W. Scranton Papers, 1963-1967
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 264, International Utilities Political Memorabilia Collection, 1789-1972
      • MG 283, Genevieve Blatt Papers, 1934-1977
      • MG 342, George Howard Earle Papers, 1932-1939, 1949, 1966, & undated
      • MG 357, Pennsylvania Women's Legislative Exchange Records, 1968-1981
      • MG 404, Dick Thornburgh Papers, 1979-1987
      • MG 406, Robert P. Casey Collection, [ca. 1953-1987]
      • MG 452, Pennsylvania's Elected Women's Association Records, 1980-1992
      • MG 494, C. Delores Tucker Papers, 1960-2005
    • Women in the Arts
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 9, Pennsylvania Writers Collection, 1899-1970
      • MG 46 Ephrata Cloister Collection, 1723-1951 (bulk 1723-1874)
      • MG 262, Special Microfilm Collections, [ca. 1620-1975]
      • MG 278, Eunice Mildred McCloskey Collection, 1931-1979
      • MG 335, Violet Harner Wise Photographs, [ca. 1945-1965]
      • MG 350, American Association of University Women, Pennsylvania Division Records, 1942-1981
      • MG 351, Julius F. Sachse Deposit of Ephrata Cloister Materials, 1680-1939 (bulk: 1725-1931)
      • MG 437, Karl Arndt Collection of Harmony Society Materials, 1794-1949
    • Women in the Military and During War
      • MG 6, Diaries and Journals Collection, 1763-1938
      • MG 7, Military Manuscripts Collection, 1758-1931
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 93, Moore Family Papers, 1749-1934 (bulk 1749-1887)
      • MG 98, Orbison Family Papers, 1750-1902
      • MG 156, Edward Martin Papers, 1866-1967 (bulk 1894-1966)
      • MG 200, Poster Collection, 1854-1971, and undated
      • MG 211, Richmond Ladies Soldiers Aid Society Papers, 1861-1865
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 283, Genevieve Blatt Papers, 1934-1977
      • MG 409, Oral History Collection, 1970-2005
    • Women’s Health
      • MG 404, Dick Thornburgh Papers, 1979-1987
      • MG 406, Robert P. Casey Collection, [ca. 1953-1987]
    • Women’s Oral Histories
      • MG 409, Oral History Collection, 1970-2005
    • Women’s Organizations and Clubs
      • MG 8, Pennsylvania Collection (Miscellaneous), 1626-1970
      • MG 43, Dock Family Papers, 1865-1951
      • MG 73, Liliane Stevens Howard Collection, 1915-1959
      • MG 84, McCreath Family Collection. 1836-1892
      • MG 98, Orbison Family Papers, 1750-1902
      • MG 101, Pennsylvania State Temperance Union Papers, 1867-1874
      • MG 123, Mrs. Elisha D. Swift Papers, 1790-1917 (bulk 1790-1871)
      • MG 143, Sarah R. Meseroll Collection, 1733-1939
      • MG 156, Edward Martin Papers, 1866-1967 (bulk 1894-1966)
      • MG 171, Samuel W. Pennypacker Papers, 1703-1916 (bulk 1851-1916)
      • MG 200, Poster Collection, 1854-1971, and undated
      • MG 201, Gertrude Howard Nauman Papers, 1780-1972
      • MG 208, William W. Scranton Papers, 1963-1967
      • MG 211, Richmond Ladies Soldiers Aid Society Papers, 1861-1865
      • MG 212, William E. Stewart Collection, [ca. 1861-1946]
      • MG 218, Photograph Collections, [ca. 1853 - ongoing]
      • MG 219, Philadelphia Commercial Museum Photograph Collection, [ca. 1840-1954]
      • MG 290, Valley Forge Branch of the Woman's National Farm and Garden Association Minute Book, 1931-1941
      • MG 309, Milton J. Shapp Papers, [ca. 1971-1979]
      • MG 350, American Association of University Women, Pennsylvania Division Records
      • MG 368, General Assembly Collections, 1798-1996
      • MG 404, Dick Thornburgh Papers, 1979-1987
      • MG 406, Robert P. Casey Collection, [ca. 1953-1987]
      • MG 452, Pennsylvania's Elected Women's Association Records, 1980-1992
      • MG 481, Records of the Pennsylvania Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., 1919-1990
      • MG 494, C. Delores Tucker Papers, 1960-2005

      

    Women’s History Bibliography

    Books: Bederman, Gail. Manliness & Civilization: A Cultural History of Gender and Race in the United States, 1880-1917. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1995.

    Blee, Kathleen M. Women of the Klan: Racism and Gender in the 1920s. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991.

    Bodnar, John. Anthracite People: Families, Unions and Work, 1900-1940. Harrisburg: PHMC, 1983.

    Boydston, Jeanne. Home and Work: Housework, Wages, and the Ideology of Labor in the Early Republic. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.

    Brown, Kathleen M. Good Wives, Nasty Wenches, and Anxious Patriarchs: Gender, Race, and Power in Colonial Virginia. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

    Brumberg, Joan Jacobs. The Body Project: An Intimate History of American Girls. New York : Vintage Books, 1998.

    Butler, Elizabeth Beardsley. Women and the Trades: Pittsburgh, 1907-1908. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1984.

    Child, Brenda J. Boarding School Seasons: American Indian Families, 1900-1940. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2000.

    Clinton, Catherine. Divided Houses: Gender and the Civil War. New York : Oxford University Press, 1992.

    Cott, Nancy F. The Bonds of Womanhood: "Woman's Sphere" in New England, 1780-1835. New Haven : Yale University Press, 1977.

    Cott, Nancy F. Public Vows: A History of Marriage and the Nation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2000.

    Creighton, Margaret S. The Colors of Courage: Gettysburg’s Forgotten History: Immigrants, Women, and African Americans in the Civil War’s Defining Battle. New York: Basic Books, 2005.

    D'Emilio, John. Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997.

    DuBois, Ellen Carol. Through Women's Eyes : An American History with Documents. Boston : Bedford, 2005.

    DuBois, Ellen . Woman Suffrage and Women's Rights. New York: NYU Press, 1998.

    Enstad, Nan. Ladies of Labor, Girls of Adventure. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.

    Faderman, Lillian. Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America. New York : Columbia University Press, 1991.

    Filene, Peter G. Him/Her/Self: Gender Identities in Modern America. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.

    George, Margaret Hewitt. Never Use Your Dim Lights, Not Even in the Fog: A Political Journey. Doylestown, Pa.: Writers Room, 2004.

    Giesberg, Judith Ann. Civil War Sisterhood: The U.S. Sanitary Commission and Women's Politics in Transition. Northeastern University Press, 2006.

    Gordon, Lynn D. Gender and Higher Education in the Progressive Era. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1990.

    Hodge, Ruth E. Guide to African American Resources at the Pennsylvania State Archives. Harrisburg : Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 2000.

    Jenson, Joan M. Loosening the Bonds: Mid-Atlantic Farm Women, 1750-1850. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986.

    Katzenstine, Caroline. Lifting the Curtain: The State and National Women's Suffrage Campaigns in Pennsylvania as I Saw Them. Philadelphia: Dorrance and Co., 1955.

    Kerber, Linda. Women of the Republic: Intellect and Ideology in Revolutionary America. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

    Kerber, Linda K. No Constitutional Right to be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship. New York: Hill and Wang, 1998.

    Kerber, Linda K. Toward an Intellectual History of Women: Essays. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997.

    Kessler-Harris, Alice. Out to Work: A History of Wage-Earning Women in the United States. New York : Oxford University Press, 1982.

    Lerner, Gerda. Black Women in White America: A Documentary History. New York, Pantheon Books, 1972.

    McElroy, Janice H. Our Hidden Heritage: Pennsylvania Women in History. Washington, D.C.: Pennsylvania Division, American Association of University Women, 1983.

    Merritt, Jane T. At the Crossroads: Indians and Empires on a Mid-Atlantic Frontier, 1700-1763. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003.

    Miller, Randall M. Pennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth. University Park, Pa.: The Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002.

    Nash, Margaret A. Women’s Education in the United States, 1780-1840. New York: Palgrave Macmillan Press, 2005.

    Norton, Mary Beth. Liberty's Daughters : The Revolutionary Experience of American Women, 1750-1800. Boston: Brown, 1980.

    Peiss, Kathy Lee. Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York. Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 1986.

    Ries, Linda A. Guide to Photographs at the Pennsylvania State Archives. Harrisburg: Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission, 1993.

    Rosenberg, Rosalind. Beyond Separate Spheres: Intellectual Roots of Modern Feminism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1982.

    Roth, Benita. Separate Roads to Feminism: Black, Chicana, and White Feminist Movements in America's Second Wave. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

    Roydhouse, Marion W. Women of Industry and Reform: Shaping the History of Pennsylvania, 1865-1940. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania Historical Association, 2007.

    Ruíz, Vicki. Unequal Sisters: An Inclusive Reader in US Women's History. New York: Routledge, 2008.

    Schmedlen, Jeanne Hearn. History of Women in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives, 1923-2001. Harrisburg: Pennsylvania House of Representatives, 2001.

    Scott, Joan Wallach. Gender and the Politics of History. New York: Columbia University Press, 1988.

    Smith, Eric Ledell. African Americans in Pennsylvania: Shifting Historical Perspectives. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1997.

    Smith-Rosenberg, Carroll. Disorderly Conduct: Visions of Gender in Victorian America. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1985.

    Solinger, Rickie. Pregnancy and Power: A Short History of Reproductive Politics in America. New York: New York University Press, 2005.

    Solomon, Barbara Miller. In the Company of Educated Women: A History of Women in Higher Education in America. Newhaven: Yale University Press, 1985.

    Stepenoff, Bonnie. Their Fathers’ Daughters: Silk Mill Workers in Northern Pennsylvania, 1880-1960. Selinsgrove and London: Susquehanna University Press and Associated Presses, 1999.

    Trennert, Robert A. “Educating Indian Girls at Non-reservation Boarding Schools, 1878-1920.” The Western Historical Quarterly, No. 13, No. 3. (July, 1882), 217-290.

    Ulrich, Laurel Thatcher. Good Wives: Image and Reality in the Lives of Women in Northern New England, 1650-1750. New York, N.Y.: Knopf, 1982.

    Ulrich, Laurel Thatcher. A Midwife's Tale: The Life of Martha Ballard, Based on Her Diary, 1785-1812. New York: Knopf, 1990.

    Ware, Susan. Modern American Women: A Documentary History. Boston: McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 2002.

    Wolensky, Kenneth C, et al. Fighting for the Union Label: The Women’s Garment Industry and the ILGWU in Pennsylvania. University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002.

    Woloch, Nancy. Women and the American Experience. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984.

    Zauhar, Frances Murphy. Out of the Kitchen: Women in the Armed Forces and on the Homefront: The Oral Histories of PA Veterans, World War II. Rev. ed. Vol. 4. Latrobe, Pa.: Saint Vincent College Center for Northern Appalachian Studies, 1997.

  • If you need further assistance, you may contact an archivist at ra-statearchives@pa.gov