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WPA and New Deal Records at the Pennsylvania State Archives

hand-colored plate of three Rhine maidens from the "Ring of the Nibelung," a cycle of four epic music dramas.
From the Pennsylvania State Archives' holdings, perhaps less well known are the Museum Extension Project plates contained in Manuscript Group 400, Works Progress Administration Records. As an example, the above hand-colored plate of three Rhine maidens from the "Ring of the Nibelung," a cycle of four epic music dramas.
The single largest cache of materials in the custody of the Pennsylvania State Archives relating to the activities of the Works Progress Administration (WPA) resides in Record Group 13, the: Records of thePennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The majority of this material is located in Series #13.108, the Working Files of the Works Progress Administration's Pennsylvania Historical Survey, [ca. 1935-1950] and consists of 133 cartons, 5 boxes, 79 microfilm rolls, 40 folders, 7 volumes, and 1 bundle divided into 139 sub-series. The Works Progress Administration provided funding for many historical research and publication projects in Pennsylvania including the Frontier Forts and Trails Survey, the American Guide Series, the Pennsylvania Historical Records Survey, the Guide to the Manuscript Collections at the Pennsylvania State Library, the Museum Extension Project, the Philadelphia Maritime Statistics Project, and the Survey of Federal Archives in Pennsylvania. Additional WPA materials of an administrative nature will also be found scattered among the Records of the Pennsylvania Historical Commission, Series 13.94 - Series 13.107.

Pennsylvania was among the first states to conduct a historical records survey under funding from the Civil Works Administration in 1933. In 1935 this state program came under the jurisdiction of the Federal Historical Records Survey that operated under the purview of the Federal Writers' Project. The Federal Writers' Project, under the direction of Henry Alsberg, was intended to publish guides that would interpret the historical and cultural heritage of communities at a grass roots level. In 1936, the Federal Historical Records Survey under the direction of Luther H. Evans was separated from the Federal Writers' Project and operated independently until the end of the Works Progress Administration in 1939. In January 1941, the Historical Records Survey was merged with the Frontier Forts and Trails Survey in Pennsylvania to form the Pennsylvania Historical Survey under the directorship of State Supervisor Eugene M. Braderman. Work on the American Guide Series was commenced in 1935 and placed particular emphasis on folklore, ethnic studies, and local guides. When Works Progress Administration funding ended work on such guides continued at the state level under the Work Projects Administration and some writers were also reassigned to work on the War History Program.

The Frontier Forts and Trails Survey collected information on the colonial-era history of western and northwestern Pennsylvania with a particular emphasis on the French and Indian War. The records consist of transcripts of historical manuscripts, letters, maps, and photographs assembled by employees of the Works Progress Administration from a variety of sources including the Library of Congress Manuscripts Division, Cleveland Public Library, Pennsylvania State Library, Public Archives of Canada, and the Erie Public Library. The records relating to the American Guide Series are typed transcripts of field notes, pre-final drafts and final drafts of manuscripts, and photographs selected to illustrate the American Guide Series. In Pennsylvania the project resulted in publication of a number of topical and county guides. Supervised by I. C. Boerlin of The Pennsylvania State College, the Museum Extension Project provided small replica models of aircraft, ships, and machinery as well as exhibits, charts, maps and posters that were used as visual aids in classrooms, shops and government training centers. In Philadelphia, the Museum Extension Project and was co-sponsored with the Philadelphia Art Museum, the Academy of the Natural Sciences, the Atwater Kent Museum, and the University of Pennsylvania Museum. Other administrative Records in Record Group 13 may also be of interest relating to the administration of various historic sites, the historical marker program, state archaeology projects, and the administration of the State Archives and State Museum.

Record Group 10: Records of the Office of the Governor , contains Series 10.60, The State Planning Board's Works Progress Administration Bituminous Coal and Coal Mining Maps, 1934-1936 that consist of quadrangle maps of bituminous coal areas drafted by the Works Progress Administration. Each map is drawn on a scale of one inch per mile and provides the WPA project number and the name of the geographic area represented. The inscriptions on each map provide information concerning active and abandoned oil wells, active and abandoned gas wells, dry holes, shafts, barrier pillars, crop lines, coal contours, drift and slope openings, county lines, township lines, and borough lines.

Record Group 20: Records of the Department of General Services , contains two series entitled Reports, Correspondence, Photographs, Blueprints, and Miscellaneous Records Relating to Works Progress Administration Construction Projects, 1930-1943. (4 cartons, 1 box) Series 20.5 and Miscellaneous Reports of the Department and Other State Agencies, 1930-1943, 1958. (20 folders, 10 volumes) Series 20.26. These materials relate to the activities of the Local Government Committee, General State Authority. the Research and Records Program, Bureau of Publications, Capitol Grounds Extension, the Delaware River Basin Commission, Eastern State Penitentiary, Executive Mansion, Aerial Defense, Public Utility Commission, State Art Commission, and the Work Program of the Works Progress Administration.

Record Group 46: Records of the Department of Mines and Mineral Industries , contains some WPA materials in a series entitled Anthracite and Bituminous Mine Inspectors' Monthly Tonnage, Man-Hour and Accident Reports, 1969-1970 (2 cartons) Series #45.2 that includes tabular monthly tonnage, man-hour and accident reports prepared by mine inspectors for the Department of Mines and Mineral Industries.

Among the manuscript groups held by the State Archives, Manuscript Group 400: Works Progress Administration Records , contains the greatest concentration of WPA materials including transcripts of such county records as quarter sessions dockets, commissioners minutes, tax assessments, road books, newspapers and a transcript of "Travels Through the United States, 1795-1797" by Duke de la Rochefoucault-Liancourt. Also present are such Museum Extension Project materials as color plates used for illustrating classic books and fairy tales and handbooks providing textual material regarding magic shows, puppet and marionette theaters, descriptions of costumes, and a history of coal

Manuscript Group 317: The Mary Barnum Bush Hauck Papers, 1931-1979 , contains about 3 cubic feet of material. Mary B.B. Hauck was a Harrisburg piano teacher and Pennsylvania State Supervisor of Music for the Emergency Education Program under the Works Progress Administration, 1937-1942. She organized the Dauphin County Folk Festivals from1935-1961 and was director of USO program services at Fort Indiantown Gap from 1943-1946. The WPA materials include original drawings by Edward C. Michener and printed posters by other artists of the WPA Art Project. Manuscript Group 160: The Arthur H. James Papers , also contains a small WPA file encompassing about half a cubic foot. Finally, Manuscript Group 220: The Merle H. Deardorff Collection , contains a few copies of early maps prepared as part of the WPA program in the series entitled Maps, 1544-1968, [undated] Series220m.7


Other Materials at the Pennsylvania State Archives Relating to the Era of the New Deal:

There are a great many resources held by the Pennsylvania State Archives in addition to the WPA materials that may prove valuable for researching the era of the New Deal in Pennsylvania. The following summary is arranged numerically by Record Group and Manuscript Group.

RECORD GROUPS

Record Group 1: Records of the Department of Agriculture

The Administrative Correspondence, 1936-1938, 1941-1956, 1958-1971 1987, 1988, 1997-2003. (71 cartons) {series #1.1} dated prior to 1953 deals almost exclusively with the Farm Show Commission except for several folders dealing with contracts and agreements dated 1936-1938. Press Office Photographs, 1890-2003.(44 cartons & 16 boxes) {series #1.5} depict department executive staff, honored guests, animal and plant diseases, promotions, buildings, exhibits, and agricultural products. Among these are views of the construction of the Department of Agriculture building and Farm Show livestock parades and champions.

Record Group 3: Records of theCivil Service Commission

Originally created in 1939, the Pennsylvania Civil Service Commission was activated under the Civil Service Act of 1941 to promote greater efficiency and economy in government by applying a merit system to state hiring and personnel management. The Civil Service originally came into existence in Pennsylvania with the passage of the Liquor Control Act in 1933 that required the Liquor Control Board to select personnel under a merit system administered by the Department of Public Instruction. By 1937, the Employment Board in the Department of Public Assistance and the Board of Review in the Division of Unemployment Compensation and Employment Service in the Department of Labor and Industry were created to administer civil serves rules. The boards operated independently until the Civil Service Commission was given the authority to operate a unified program in 1941. The Minutes, 1942-1969. (2 cartons) {series #3.2} contain the minute books of the State Civil Service Commission covering meetings held from April 16, 1942 through the last meeting of 1969. The series entitled Minutes and Agenda (Rough Drafts) 1943-1966, 1970-2002. (5 boxes and 11 cartons) {series #3.3} cover meetings of State Civil Service Commission from December 31, 1943 to December 15, 1966. The Minutes of the Employment Board of the Department of Public Assistance, 1942 (1 box) {series #3.4} concern the administration of a merit system before the Civil Service Commission began operate a unified program. The Records Relating to the Administration of Merit Systems by the Civil Service Commission and the Departments of Public Assistance and Labor and Industry, 1926-1966. (1 box) {series #3.5} documents the classification system for positions held by Civil Service employees. These materials originated in the Department of Labor and Industry, the Unemployment Compensation Board of Review and the Employment Board of the Department of Public Assistance. Included in this series are various statutes, rules and procedures governing the Commission, annual and biennial reports, and merit system reviews of the State Civil Service Commission.

Record Group 6: Records of the Department of Forests and Waters

The Bureau of Parks within the Department of Forests and Waters was responsible for maintaining state parks and a large number of state forest monuments, natural areas, and state forest picnic areas. The Addresses, Press Releases and Related Correspondence, 1935-1936. (1 folder) {series #6.11} of Eric von Hausswolff and others address trends in camping during the period and ideas on how to make parks self-supporting. The General Correspondence, 1922-1941. (9 cartons) {series #6.12} relates to various state projects, state parks and related state programs including Valley Forge Park, Washington Crossing Park, World's End Park, Whipple Dam, and various Works Progress Administration Projects. The Minutes of Various Park Commissions and the State Park Commission, 1928-1938. (6 folders) {series #6.13} include minutes of the Bushy Run Battlefield Commission, Conrad Weiser Park Commission, Pennsylvania Recreational Council, Valley Forge Park Commission, Washington Crossing Park Commission and the State Park Commission. Information provided is date and location of meeting, names of those present, and a description of the business transacted. The Reports of the Bureau of Parks, 1924-1941. (13 folders){series #6.14} include monthly, biennial and annual reports of the Bureau of Parks and special reports on Bowman's Hill Wildflower Preserve, Delaware State Forest, and the Historical Commission report by J. O. Clarke with reference to the forge dams and races at Valley Forge Creek in 1777-1778. Also present are reports on "General Restoration at Valley Forge Park" (1936), and "Land Acquisitions at Valley Forge Park" (1936-1941). Many reports include maps and blueprints. For related materials see Records of the Valley Forge Park Commission (RG-46) .

The Motion Picture Films [ca. 1930-1950]. (43 16mm reels) {series #6.19} were produced for the purpose of documenting and publicizing the Department's programs. Most are 400-foot silent black and white films depicting such topics as gypsy moth population control, the life cycle of the pine seed, and proper tree trimming practices. Two films show unemployment relief workers cutting firewood and building roads at Birch Run Dam and five others are devoted to Civilian Conservation Corps activities across the state. Among the films designed for public education are such titles as "The Sugar Maple Industry in Pennsylvania," "Trees for Tomorrow," and "The Life of a Seedling." Also present are two forest fire films produced by federal agencies; one entitled "Then It Happened" was produced by the United States Department of Agriculture and one entitled "The Enemy of Fire" was produced by the United States Office of Civilian Defense.

The Photographs and Negatives, [ca. 1890-1971] (16 cartons, 1 box, 36 drawers){series #6.20} include approximately 8,000 photographic prints and over 2,700 matching negatives created by the staff of the Department of Forests and Waters for the purpose of education and publicity. Many of the early photographs were taken by forest rangers such as Joseph Illick, George Wirt, and Henry Clepper. Many later images from the 1930s and 1940s were by staff photographers such as David S. Nace. Integrated into the series are private photograph collections of Pennsylvania Forester Joseph T. Rothrock and Galeton commercial photographer William T. Clarke. Topics include "Camps and Camp Sites," "Demonstration Forests" at Caledonia, Lebo, Sligo and Millstone, "Emergency Conservation Work" depicting Civilian Conservation Corps members living and working at many camps throughout the state, "Farm Woodlots" depicting the use of forests as part of farms, "Floods and Flood Control" depicting flooding along the Delaware Canal and "Forest Conditions" showing the composition of stands of trees, water supply, and natural forest regeneration.

Record Group 9: Records of theGeneral State Authority

The General State Authority was both an independent public corporation and governmental body created in 1935 to enable the Commonwealth to circumvent constitutional restrictions on its borrowing capacity. Since the state could not legally take advantage of federal grant and loan offers from the Public Works Administration, the Authority was given the responsibility of negotiating for the funds needed to expand and modernize state facilities. The objective of the Authority was to build new buildings and remodel old ones that they then leased to the state until the end of their amortization period at which time they would turn the buildings over to the Commonwealth. The General State Authority was abolished in 1945, but the need for additional state facilities led to the creation of another General State Authority in 1949. Though the Department of General Services was created in 1975 to replace the General State Authority and the Department of Property and Supplies, the Authority will continue to function until the outstanding debts from earlier projects are satisfied. The Construction Photographs and Blueprints, 1932-1939. (10 boxes, 4 folders) {series #9.1} primarily consist of 8x10 black and white photographs of construction, expansion, or modernization of various Commonwealth-owned properties. Some blueprints are interfiled among the photographs. Each print is labeled with the job and docket number, name of facility, location, date, name of contractor and the status of construction. Local commercial photographers were often hired and are occasionally identified on the print. Subjects are principally exterior views of construction in progress at Pennsylvania National Guard Armories, hospitals, teachers colleges, prisons and miscellaneous state buildings. Views of armories include those at Altoona, Canonsburg, Clearfield, Coraopolis, Gettysburg, Hamburg, Huntingdon, Lancaster, Lewistown, Ligonier, Philadelphia, Tunkhannock, Waynesboro and Williamsport. Hospitals include those at Allentown, Ashland, Blossburg, Coaldale, Connellsville, Danville, Fairview, Hazleton, Locust Mountain, Nanticoke, Norristown, Phillipsburg, Scranton, Torrance, Warren, and Wernersville; the Western Pennsylvania Tuberculosis Hospital in Butler, and the Western Pennsylvania Psychiatric Hospital at Pittsburgh. Teachers Colleges include those at Bloomsburg, California, Clarion, East Stroudsburg, Edinboro, Indiana, Kutztown, Lock Haven, Mansfield, Shippensburg, Slippery Rock and West Chester. Prison/Industrial Homes and Schools include the Eastern State Penitentiary, Huntingdon Industrial School, Lawn Maximum Security Prison, Industrial School at Pennhurst, Polk State School and the Industrial Reformatory at Huntingdon.

The Minutes of the Board 1949-1980 (57 volumes) {series #9.2} provide budgetary information of the building projects undertaken by the General State Authority. The Reports and Related Records 1935-1940 (4 folders){series #9.3} contains a description of activities and accomplishments of the General State Authority as reported Executive Director Colonel Augustine Janeway. The reports also contain a brief history of the agency's origin and purpose, the budgets for the construction of buildings under the Authority's direction and the accommodation capacities of the structures. Additionally, this series contains reports from the chief engineer of the Authority regarding the effects of contemporary state building codes upon various building projects. A list of names of architects and subcontractors overseeing building projects and their budgets is also provided.

Record Group 10: Records of theOffice of the Governor

This record group contains the: Records of thePennsylvania State Planning Board that was first created by Governor Gifford Pinchot in 1934. In 1936 the State Planning Board was formally established as an independent administrative board by Act No. 32 (July 1936) to conduct research, prepare plans for the physical and economic development of the state, and examine all plans proposed new projects. Studies were conducted concerning economic and agricultural productivity, soil resources, minerals, water and forest products, population growth, employment and income trends, transportation and housing, recreational facilities, flood protection, stream pollution, highway safety, and other fields vital to the public welfare. The Minutes and Agenda 1934-1978 (10 cartons) {series #10.58} document the meetings of the State Planning Board. The Works Progress Administration Bituminous Coal and Coal Mining Maps 1934-1936 (3 microfilm rolls) {series #10.60} depict quadrangle maps of bituminous coal areas drafted by the Works Progress Administration. Each map is drawn on a scale of one inch per mile. The maps provide the WPA project number and the name of the geographic area represented in the map. The legends for the maps provide information concerning active and abandoned oil wells, active and abandoned gas wells, dry holes, shafts, barrier pillars, crop lines, coal contours, drift and slope openings, county lines, township lines, and borough lines.

Record Group 11: Records of the Department of Health

The General Correspondence 1930-1976 (18 cartons, 4 boxes) {series #11.1} contains both routine correspondence and minutes of meetings, personnel rules and regulations, transcripts of speeches delivered by the Secretary of Health, transcripts of speeches delivered by employees of the Department of Health, and miscellaneous reports relating to all functions of the Department of Health. The series is grouped into two periods dating from 1939-1955 and from 1930-1976. The Legal Opinions 1920-1965 (15 folders) {series #11.2} include certificates, letters, memoranda, rules and regulations. Divided by program, each file contains a listing of major decisions or events. Individual file folders are present for the Bureau of Sanitation, chronic diseases, executive correspondence, tuberculosis, housing, industrial hygiene, local health service, maternal and child care, milk sanitation, preventative services, sanatoria and the Crippled Children's Hospital, undertakers, and vital statistics.

The Bureau of Sanitary Engineering was charged with supervision of public water supplies and acted as an administrative arm of the Sanitary Water Board in executing the Commonwealth's Clean Streams Program. This Program involved the examination of plans for issuance permits for sewerage and industrial waste projects and mine drainage projects (except for bituminous strip mine drainage). The Bureau conducted comprehensive water quality studies and developed long range water quality management plans. During periods of flooding, droughts, and epidemics the Bureau supplied resources in assisting with the supervision of emergency sanitation measures. The Civil Works Administration Project Reports 1933-1938 (7 folders) {series #11.33} include a manual and reports concerned with the Abandoned Mine Project for the Civil Works Projects, Federal Security Agency , and the United States Public Health Service. The Manual of Policy, Organization and Uniform Practice for Sealing Abandoned Coal Mines provides information on construction methods, engineering and survey records, a report on purchases and payroll and a report on mine sealing in Pennsylvania that contains maps and charts documenting abandoned mines, and reduction of acid load after mine closures. Also included is another Civil Works Project report on community sanitation throughout Pennsylvania. This includes photographs of unsanitary conditions in company housing and the latrines built for the project. Reports and Correspondence Relating to Floods 1936-1937 (2 folders) {series #11.34} contains several papers delivered by Chief Engineer W.L. Stevenson and Assistant Chief Engineer H.E. Moses at national conventions of the American Water Works Association, American Society for Civil Engineers and New England Waterworks concerning public sanitation problems arising during the floods of 1936 and 1937. Also included is a printed leather bound volume published by the Pennsylvania Water and Power Company concerning ice jams and floods that occurred at Holtwood and Safe Harbor. There are also several papers on flooding that occurred in Kentucky and West Virginia and an abstract of telegrams relating to post flood conditions in Pennsylvania in March 1936. Related materials can be found in the: Records of the Department of Public Welfare's State Emergency Relief Board, 1932-1937 (series #23.354-series #23.359) .

Record Group 12: Records of the Department of Highways

The Annual and Biennial Report Books, 1905-1942 (18 volumes) {series #12.1} are liberally illustrated with photographs depicting bridge and road construction and reconstruction projects and also with tables revealing such types of information as the number of miles of public roads, number of miles of toll roads, area in square miles, mileage per square mile, and population density for each county. The Correspondence and Miscellaneous Records Relating Primarily to Toll Bridges 1925-1959 (2 boxes) {series #12.3} relate rates charged and acquisition of toll bridges by the Commonwealth from private companies. Among the materials present are various monthly editions of A Directory of Bridges, Ferries and Steamship Lines, Schedules and Rates published by the National Touring Bureau of the American Automobile Association (Washington, D.C.: 1932, 1933). Also present are copies of House Bill 932 introduced by Mr. Coulson on March 3, 1943 "Directing the Department of Highways to acquire all toll bridges within the Commonwealth providing the procedure therefore and the cost of construction, maintenance, and repair of such bridges. . . " and House Resolution 69 introduced by Mr. Coulson May 3, 1943 that reads "The People of Pennsylvania by a majority vote have approved of the purchase by the Commonwealth of the few remaining privately-owned intrastate toll bridges in the state and have authorized the issuance of ten million dollars of bonds for that purpose." The last folder contains miscellaneous undated materials including samples of coupon ticket books for the Clark's Ferry Bridge, Sunbury Bridge, Point Marion Bridge, Walnut Street Bridge, and Market Street Bridge.

The Main File of Black and White Prints and Negatives [ca. 1924-1956] (61 boxes, 40 drawers){series #12.10} initiated by the Department of Information contains more than 37,000 negatives, of which most are 8x10s, with matching contact prints for many, but not all, items. The prints are mounted on cards providing such descriptive information as negative number, subject, location, and name of photographer. Six log books list the negatives numerically and provide similar descriptive information. The Photographic Unit's Construction File 1938-1961 (8 drawers) {series #12.11} contains more than 2,500 negatives of highway construction projects concentrated primarily in Allegheny and Philadelphia Counties during the period 1944-1960. Some negatives will also be found for highway construction projects in Armstrong, Beaver, Bedford, Berks, Bucks, Butler, Cambria, Carbon, Chester, Clearfield, Columbia, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Erie, Fayette, Franklin, Huntingdon, Indiana, Jefferson, Lackawanna, Lancaster, Lawrence, Lebanon, Lehigh, Lycoming, Montgomery, Northampton, Northumberland, and Perry Counties.The Photographic Unit's File of Mounted and Unmounted Prints [ca. 1913-1932] (17 boxes){series #12.12} was formerly known as "The 5x7 File" and primarily covers the period 1913-1932.

Record Group 14: Records of the Department of Internal Affairs

The Annual Reports of Manufactured Gas Companies 1931-1936, 1939-1955 (3 cartons) {series #14.10} were submitted to the Department of Internal Affairs by manufactured gas companies. Information provided is date of report, name and address of home office, amount of capital invested in Pennsylvania, names and addresses of officers, rate schedule, estimated population in area served, average number of male and female employees, total wages and salaries paid to male and female employees, and a breakdown of natural gas production by county. A breakdown is provided for the volume and value of each type of gas and gas byproduct manufactured. These include carbonized coal in net tons, coke products in net tons, tar products in net tons, water gas produced in millions of cubic feet, coke oven gas produced in millions of cubic feet, still gas produced in millions of cubic feet, water gas purchased in millions of cubic feet, coke oven gas purchased in millions of cubic feet, still gas purchased in millions of cubic feet, ammonia products in pounds, benzol products in pounds, naphthalene produced in pounds, gas brought into Pennsylvania in millions of cubic feet, and gas sold outside Pennsylvania in millions of cubic feet. Also given are statistical breakdowns of gas sales, length and dimensions of transmission lines, and a list of the cities, towns and political subdivisions served.

The Annual Reports of Motor Vehicles 1935-1938, 1954-1955 (9 folders) {series #14.11} contain balance sheets filed with the Department of Internal Affairs by common carriers for motor vehicles. Information provided is name and address of carrier, date of incorporation, assets, liabilities, fixed capital, cost of fixed capital, fund assets, property abandoned, proprietorship (for individuals and partnerships), funded debt, judgments, reserve and depreciation, depreciation rule reserves, comparative income statement, surplus, profit and loss, operating revenues, operating expenses, rent for lease of property, insurance, motor vehicles employed in bus and taxicab service, summary of vehicles employed in each service, and various other operating statistics. The Annual Reports of Municipal Water Systems 1931-1935, 1939-1955 (10 cartons) {series #14.13} were filed with the Department of Internal Affairs by municipal water systems and generally give the date of the report, name of respondent making the report, address of the home office, names and addresses of officers, location of the water plant, estimate of population in territory served, rate schedule, and a statistical breakdown of water sales.

Annual Reports of Natural Gas Companies, 1931-1936, 1939-1955 (9 cartons) {series #14.14} were submitted to the Department of Internal Affairs by natural gas companies and generally provide the date of report, name and address of the home office, amount of capital invested in Pennsylvania, names and addresses of officers, rate schedule, estimated population in area served, average number of male and female employees, total wages and salaries paid to male and female employees, and a breakdown of natural gas production by county. The natural gas production breakdown by county gives the number of acres owned, the number of acres under lease, the number of gas wells owned and operated, the number of million cubic feet of gas purchased, the number of million cubic feet of gas produced, the number of productive wells drilled, the number of non-productive wells drilled, the number of gas wells abandoned, the number of million cubic feet exchanged with other companies, the number of wells sold, the number of million cubic feet of gas imported to Pennsylvania, and the number of million cubic feet exported from Pennsylvania. Also given are statistical breakdowns of gas sales, length and dimensions of transmission pipelines, and a list of the cities, towns and political subdivisions served.

Annual Reports of Passenger and Street Railway Companies,1861-1955. (142 cartons) {series #14.15} were filed with the Department of Internal Affairs by passenger and street railway companies. Information provided is date of report, name of company, names and residences of officers, location of general offices, history of organization and construction, capital stock, debt, and a description of the characteristics of the line such as the number of car houses, sheds, stables, depots, and first and second class passenger cars together with the capacity of the cars and the number of cars propelled by electricity, horses, and mules. Also given are the number of trips per day, the number of miles run each day, average time consumed in passing over the road and the material of the foundation upon which the rails were laid. Finally, there is a monthly statement of the number of passengers carried, rate of fare, expenses and receipts, summary of payments, general balance sheet, a statement of stock and dividends, and an account of important changes made during the year.

Annual Reports of Private and Municipal Electric Light, Heat and Power Companies and Steam Heat Companies, 1931-1965 (7 cartons) {series #14.16} were submitted to the Department of Internal Affairs by private and municipal electric light, heat and power companies and steam heat companies. Information provided is date of report, name and address of electric utility, names of counties served, form of ownership, breakdown of investment in electric plant, breakdown of installed capacity (steam generation, hydro-generation, and internal combustion generation), and the fuel consumption and kilowatt-hour production by type of fuel (anthracite coal, bituminous coal, lignite, fuel oil, gas and hydroelectric production). Also given is a breakdown of operating revenue and sales data for the preceding year (residential, rural, commercial, industrial, public street and highway lighting and railway and street railway). Finally, there is a breakdown of revenue and expenses for the preceding year, average employment and total wages paid for the preceding year, water intake during the preceding year other than from public water systems, and name and address of person to be contacted concerning contents of the report.

Annual Reports of Private Water Companies, 1931-1936, 1938-1955 (17 cartons) {series #14.17} were submitted to the Department of Internal Affairs by private water companies and generally provide the date of the report, the name and address of the company, the names and addresses of corporate officers, the names of cities and political subdivisions served, location of plant, estimated population of territory served, statistical breakdown on each type of consumer, number of gallons furnished, revenue derived from sales, total amount of investment, operating revenue and expenses for preceding year, type of system, type of reservoir, whether chemicals or filtration was used and the length of the distribution system.

Annual Reports of Railway and Street Railway Companies to the Auditor General and the Department of Internal Affairs, 1859-1957 (333 cartons, 1 box) {series #14.18} were filed by railroads and street railway companies and generally provide the date of report, name of company, names and residences of officers, location of general offices, history of organization and construction, capital stock, debt, cost, and a description of the characteristics of the main line, branches and leased lines. The description includes the gauge of the track, length of telegraph lines, description of bridges and trestles, crossings, and doings of the year. Financial information includes earnings for the year, expenditures charged to the cost of the road, real estate and equipment, expenditures charged to operating the line, general balance sheet, and stocks and dividends. Also given are the names of associated express companies and transportation companies and information regarding sleeping cars and carriage of U. S. Mail.
Annual Reports of Telegraph and Telephone Companies, 1868-1871, 1873-1875, 1877-1936, 1939-1965 (41 cartons, 1 box) {series #14.21} were filed by telegraph and telephone companies and generally provide the date of report or return, name and address of company, location of the area served, names and addresses of all officers of the company, and balance sheet summaries with expenses for Pennsylvania only. Records for companies included in the small box are Atlantic and Pacific Telegraph Company, Atlantic and Ohio Telegraph Company, American District Telegraph Company, Automatic Telegraph Company, Erie County Telegraph Company, Merchants National Telegraph Company, Philadelphia Local Telegraph Company, Philadelphia, Reading & Pottsville Telegraph Company, and Western Union Telegraph Company.

The Registers of Steam Railroads, Street Railways, Canals, Telegraph and Telephone Companies, 1890-1926, 1932-1936. (3 cartons, 1 box) {series #14.26} provide such information as name of company, location of the general office, date forms were received from the company, the date the receipt that the form was returned, the name and title of the person to whom sent, address to which sent, date report filed, date of charter, and remarks. Local Government Annual Financial Reports, 1935-1965 (79 cartons) {series #14.37} were filed by local governments with the Department of Internal Affairs. Information provided is date of report, name of township and county, statement of revenue receipts from tax and non-tax income, non-revenue receipts from borrowed money and transfers between townships, general fund expenditures, tax statement, debt statement, and certification.

Record Group 15: Records of the Department of Justice

A significant number of records created by the Bureau of Correction and the Bureau of Pardons relating to admissions and discharges, parole and respite books, and minute books may be of interest to scholars conducting research into the era of the New Deal. The appropriate records may be located by browsing the finding aids for the relevant time period.

Record Group 16: Records of the Department of Labor and Industry

The Legislative Voting Records, 1911-1936 (1 folder) {series #16.46} document the voting records of various legislators on labor-related topics such as workers' rights, industry regulation, child and female laborers, pollution, taxation and the elderly. Information generally provided about each legislator's voting record includes the year of the legislative session, type of session (general, special, or extraordinary), bill number, bill title or purpose, legislative journal page, the person's vote and often the total tally of yeas and nays. Legislators represented include: Frank J. Atkins, Frank E. Baldwin, Richard J. Baldwin, Alonzo S. Batchelor, E. P. Brown, James Boyd, J. M. Flinchbaugh, C. R. Griffith and Elder Peelor. Also present are records for various Allegheny County "Members," such as W.B. Benn, H. W. Cromer, W. Dodds, T. P. Geary, W. W. Hamilton, W. J. Howarth, J. C. Kaiser, J. Lauler, W. J. Mangan, W. J. McCaig, W. W. Mearkle, W. C. Murdock, C. E. Staving, J. G. Steedle, A. C. Stein, J. C. Sullivan, J. Swan, N. Vicar, J. W. Vickerman, W. C. Wagner, J. Wettack, N. A. Whitten, J. F. Woodward and J. R. Wylie, as well as Allegheny County Senators, namely W. J. Burke, C. H. Kline, C. J. Magee, W. S. McKee, J. P. Moore and W. H. Semmens.

The Staff Training Bulletins, 1937 (1 folder) {series #16.5} were distributed to employees of the Department's Division of Unemployment Compensation and Employment in order to familiarize them with the Pennsylvania Unemployment Compensation Law and its administration. Included among the bulletins is a history of the Unemployment Compensation Law and of public employment services in Pennsylvania. Cancelled Memoranda and Bulletins, 1937-1951 (2 cartons) {series #16.8} were issued by the Bureau of Employment Security and the United States Employment Service of the War Manpower Commission that announced policies, procedures, rules, and regulations for the operation of public assistance programs. The memoranda and bulletins are grouped topically and relate to work projects, public assistance, administrative instructions, employment service procedures, unemployment compensation procedures, training registration, placement procedures, fiscal affairs, office management, statistical record keeping, field accounting procedures, and appeals to the Board of Review. In addition, Executive Director's bulletins for 1938 through 1951 provide administrative guidelines for the operation of the Bureau of Employment Service.

The World War Informational Films, [ca. 1941-1943] (10 reels) {series #16.14} were obtained by the Bureau of Employment Security from federal government agencies. Most were made during World War II and deal with such topics as the role of women in the war effort and the use of railroads by the military. Titles include: "All Out for Victory," "Glamour Girls of 1943," and Women on the Warpath," produced by the United States War Manpower Commission; "Community at War," Railroaders Always," and "Women Power" produced by the U.S. Army Pictorial Service (Signal Corps); "Lifeline of the National Railroads" produced by Carl Dudley Productions; and "Your Job Insurance," ca. 1936, produced by the U.S. Social Security Board that explains the procedures for obtaining workman's compensation in Pennsylvania. The latter includes footage of President Roosevelt and Pennsylvania Governor George Earle. The Press Releases, 1939-1952 (6 volumes) {series #16.15} issued by the Office of Employment Security cover such topics as unemployment rates, unemployment compensation contributions, expanding the interstate job placement service, the Governor's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, the meeting of the IAPES Institute at Hershey and the National Employ the Physically Handicapped Essay Contest.

The Bureau of Mediation mediates disputes between unions and employers in the public sector under Act 195 and in the private sector under the Mediation Act of 1937. It also furnishes the names of arbitrators for arbitration panels upon the request of either party to a collective bargaining agreement under Act 195, provides grievance mediators upon request, and encourages cooperative relationships between workers and management in plants, schools, and other places of work. The Labor Dispute Case Files, 1938-1943, 1951-1953 (12 boxes) {series #16.16} contain preliminary reports and summary final reports, memoranda, and correspondence concerning mediation of labor disputes. Information given includes the case number, the name and location of the company, the type of industry, the nature and cause of the dispute, the craft concerned, and the duration of the dispute. The final disposition reports reveal terms of the final settlement, the number of employees affected (broken down by gender), and the number of firms or employers affected by the dispute.

The Industrial Board consists of five members, four of whom are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The Secretary of Labor and Industry is the ex officio member and the Board is assisted by four advisory boards consisting of technical experts in the areas of boiler operations, elevators, buildings, and power actuated tools. The Board holds hearings regarding laws affecting labor upon appeals from either employees, employers, or the public and decides upon disposition of such appeals, approves rules and regulations established by the Department, and makes suggestions for formulating rules and regulations. The Accident Prevention and Industrial Hygiene Training Course Book for State Factory and Building Inspectors, 1937 (1 volume) {series #16.19} was used for a course conducted under the joint auspices of the United States Department of Labor's Division of Labor Standards, the Institute of Local and State Government, the University of Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania State College and the University of Pittsburgh. Subjects covered include basic safety inspection requirements, the fundamentals of conducting safety inspections, maintaining good housekeeping, the use of safety guards, and restricting access to areas where machinery is operating. There is also material relating to safety issues in particular industries such as woodworking, metalworking, foundry work, laundry printing, and textiles. The Digest of the Industrial Board Minutes, 1937-1944 (1 box) {#16.40} contains summaries of Industrial Board meeting minutes providing the date and time the meeting was convened, names of the members of the board in attendance, old and new business covered, a listing of the cases discussed which includes the case number, petitioner, subject and action taken; and devices approved. The Minutes, 1914-1986. (6 cartons and 15 boxes) {series #16.22} of the Industrial Board reveal decisions of the Board.

The Monthly Bulletin Books, 1914-1934 (21 volumes) {series #16.28} contain public information bulletins issued by the Department of Labor and Industry. Information is given on rules and regulations issued by the Industrial Board, decisions of the Workmen's Compensation Board, labor legislation, industrial statistics, proceedings of conferences, and activity reports of the Department and its bureaus. Information is also found concerning a variety of safety issues, accidents reported, employment statistics, sanitation, child labor, workmen's compensation, health, industrial relations, and related topics. The Pennsylvania Labor and Industry Review Books, 1939-1945, 1947-1949 (24 volumes) {series #16.31} contain public information pamphlets published quarterly by the Department of Labor and Industry. These reviews generally provide summaries of the functions and activities of the various boards and bureaus in the Department, rules and interpretations issued by the Industrial Board, and lists of departmental publications. The Reports File, 1906-1958 (4 cartons) {series #16.32} contains reference reports and studies maintained by the library of the Department of Labor and Industry. The reports relate to such topics as accidents and safety, asbestosis, building permits and housing, unemployment rates, disabled and older workers, interstate cooperation and compacts, labor unions, industrial disputes, and public assistance.

Selected Readings on Apprenticeship Training [ca. 1940] (3 volumes) {series #16.33} edited by J.C. Phillips, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania and a technical adviser for the Works Progress Administration Project #16712, contains readings that were designed to assist in planning apprenticeship and training programs. The three volumes cover such subjects as the need for apprenticeship training, the historical background of apprenticeship training programs, planning and methods used in apprenticeship training, case histories in specific industries, legislative and administrative experiences in America and abroad and the role of America's public schools. Selected Readings on Occupational Diseases, [ca. 1940] (3 volumes) {series #16.34} edited by J.C. Phillips, Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania and technical adviser for Works Progress Administration Project #16712, contains readings that were designed to help define occupational diseases for the purpose of determining appropriate compensation. The readings define the scope of the problem of occupational disease, provide a classification of occupational diseases, describe experiences in specific industries, provide technical analyses of various types of occupational disease, explore the methods of dispensing occupational disease compensation, and give a legislative and administrative history of occupational diseases in America and abroad. A section is devoted to women and occupational disease and methods are given for reporting and conducting statistical analysss of such diseases to assist in achieving more timely diagnosis, prevention and control.

Special Bulletin Books, 1924-1963 (11 volumes) {series #16.35} contain public information bulletins published by the Department of Labor and Industry on specific topics. Among the topics covered are union wage scales and hours of labor, industrial home work in Pennsylvania, a state-wide safety conference, a conference on women and children in industry, industrial home work and child labor, workmen's compensation laws, Philadelphia migratory child workers and school attendance, and the history of child labor legislation in Pennsylvania. The United States Department of Commerce Census of Manufactures, 1939 (2 cartons) {series #16.36} contains a census taken on manufacturers in the United States by the Bureau of Census in the United States Department of Commerce. Census data is given for such industries as steel, lumber, lacquer and veneer, automotive accessories, hardware, plumbing, and logging among others. There are statistical breakdowns of the number of industrial establishments, the number of salaried and wage employees, salary and wage levels, the volume of work load reported, the value of the product manufactured, the value added by labor, and the cost of materials.

The Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board consists of three members appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate to administer the Public Employee Relations Act of 1970 (Act 195) governing labor relations between public employees and their employers and the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Act of 1937 which covers small private sector employers over which the National Labor Relations Board does not exercise jurisdiction. The Annual Reports, 1937-2005 (5 boxes) {series #16.47} of the Labor Relations Board represent a nearly complete run of reports dating from the inception of the Board in June 1937. The style of the reports varies over the years, although the type of information contained in them remains basically unchanged. There was a year-by-year volume numbering system utilized until it was discontinued in 1977, with subsequent reports containing one, two, three or even four years in one single document. The studies include data on the cases which were heard during the course of the calendar year or years, both specific and cumulative, a general accounting of the overall activities for the time period in question, as well as information related to new laws enacted which had a direct impact on the Board and its work. The initial report from 1937 is very informative, in laying out the reasons for the Board's creation as well as the specific duties it was charged with carrying out. The Legal Files, 1937-1968 (18 cartons){series #16.37} contain legal briefs, appeals, court opinions, court orders, and related court papers concerning adjudication of cases brought before the Labor Relations Board that were appealed in the judicial system. The cases concern employee representation, collective bargaining, and unfair labor practices. The Minutes, 1937-1977 (4 cartons) {series #16. 38} of the meetings of the Labor Relations Board generally provide the date, location, and identification number of the meeting, the names of the members and administrative staff in attendance, and a summary of the motions approved by the board.

Record Group 19: Records of the Department of Military and Veterans Affairs

The World War I Veterans Service and Compensation File, 1917-1919, 1934-1948 (555 cartons) {series #19.91} contains Service Statement Cards, Compensation Applications and War Service Record survey questionnaires filled out by World War I veterans in 1920 for the Pennsylvania War History Commission. The Compensation Applications were submitted after state funding was appropriated under the New Deal to pay an early bonus to veterans of the war. Entries normally provide such information as the name, rank, serial number, race, date and place of birth, legal residence at time of application and enlistment, places and dates where enrolled and discharged, and the period of service. Information concerning engagements in which involved, wounds suffered, dates of service overseas, and the names and addresses of dependents are also included. The documents are signed and dated by the applicant. The World War I Service Medal Application Cards, [ca. 1938-1950] (2 cartons) {series #19.196} were submitted by veterans of World War I and their survivors who applied for service medals in accordance with the Act of April 21, 1937, P.L. 331, Sections 1 and 2. Information provided about each veteran consists of name and serial number, place of residence at time of entry into service, date and place the veteran entered into service, rank, military unit to which attached, place and date of honorable discharge, and the signature of the applicant. Also present are the initials of the person by whom the remittance was received and of the person acting on behalf of the Adjutant General and each card is stamped with the date of approval. The reverse side of each card shows the name of the veteran or survivor applying for the medal, and the address to which the medal was to be mailed.
The World War II Veterans Compensation Applications, [ca. 1950] (3,082 cartons) {series #19.92} were submitted by Pennsylvania veterans who applied for the World War II bonus provided for by the Act of June 1, 1947 (P.L. 565). Information contained on the applications includes the names, signatures, residences, birth dates, places of birth, sex and serial numbers of the individuals; the dates of domestic and foreign service rendered; the branches of the service enlisted in; the dates and places where the applicants entered and left active service; the applicants' residences at the time of their enlistment; the names and locations of the applicants' draft boards; the dates the applications were received and processed; the amounts of compensation awarded; and the names and residences of the veteran's beneficiaries, living parents and dependents. The applications, which are notarized and dated, also record the ages of dependents, whether the persons were still on active duty in the armed forces, and whether they had ever received sea duty pay or a bonus before. At times, remarks appear that indicate why some applications were rejected.
The Muster Rolls of the Pennsylvania Reserve Defense Corps Auxiliary, 1942-1945 (1 carton) {series #19.118} that was created by executive order of Governor Arthur B. James on March 19, 1941 to take the place of the Pennsylvania National Guard while it was in active service during World War II provide a record of the units of self-equipped civilian defense.

Record Group 20: Records of the Department of General Services

The General Correspondence Relating to Public Works Administration, 1938-1940 (1 folder) {series #20.4} documents the activities of the Public Works Administration that was first created as the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works Title II in the National Industrial Recovery Act of June 1933. This represented the first national peacetime effort to create jobs under the New Deal. Eventually known as the Public Works Administration (PWA), this program spent over $6 billion to shore up the nation's infrastructure while combating unemployment. Under the direction of Secretary of the Interior Harold Ickes, the PWA constructed and refurbished highways, dams, low-cost housing, airports, warships, and other public projects. States and municipalities provided supervision in some cases, but all had to follow PWA guidelines. The PWA was prohibited from using convict labor or to work employees more than thirty hours a week. In order to maximize employment opportunities, congress required that human labor be used instead of machinery whenever possible.

The Reports, Correspondence, Photographs, Blueprints, and Miscellaneous Records Relating to Works Progress Administration Construction Projects, 1930-1943 (4 cartons, 1 box) {series #20.5} relate to building and renovation projects at Ashland State Hospital, Blossburg State Hospital, Capitol Buildings and Grounds, Cornwall Iron Furnace, Cumberland Valley State Institution for Mental Defectives, Daniel Boone Homestead, Danville State Hospital, Edinboro State Teachers College, Enola Experimental Station, Ephrata Cloister, Fairview State Hospital, Farm Show Building, Hamburg Sanitarium, Harrisburg State Hospital, Indiana State Teachers College, Laurelton State Village, Mansfield State Teachers College, Morganza Training School, Mont Alto Sanitarium, Muncy Industrial Home, Museum Building, Nanticoke State Hospital, Norristown State Hospital, North Office Building No. 2, Old Economy Village, Pennhurst State School, Pennsbury Memorial, Pennsylvania Railroad Construction No. 2 on Piers and Tracks, Phoenixville Armory, Police Barracks in Harrisburg, Scotland Soldiers' Orphans School, South Office Building No. 1, State Industrial School for Women, Thaddeus Stevens Industrial School, Warren State Hospital, and Wernersville State Hospital.
The State Art Commission that was created in 1919 by P.L. 103 consisted of five citizens appointed by the Governor to examine and approve the design and location of a wide variety of public structures, including monuments, memorials and buildings acquired by the Commonwealth. The Commission also reviewed plans for structures funded by the State Treasury or by any political subdivision, as well as those for which the site was furnished by the Commonwealth or public agency. Exceptions to the Commission's jurisdiction were cities of the first and second class. The Minutes, 1919-1950, 1965-1968 (9 folders) {series #20.40} provide such information as the names of members present, submission numbers, names and resolutions relating to the submissions, actions taken and discussions about the policies and procedures of the Commission. The Procedural and Organizational Files, 1919-1997 (7 folders) {series #20.44} contain information on policies and procedures of the Commission, budgets, sample letters to those submitting entries for approval, and organization and function statements.

Established by the Act of April 9, 1929 (P.L. 177), the Department of Property and Supplies was the service and purchasing agency for all other state departments, agencies, boards, commissions, and other divisions of state government. The Secretary of Property and Supplies appointed by the Governor with the advice and consent of the Senate was the chief administrative officer of the Department. The Budget Materials, 1931-1964 (2 cartons) {series #20.8} include biennial budget supplements of actual and estimated operating expenditures by departments and appropriations submitted to the General Assembly by the Governor. Budget Circular #4 for 1931 details "Classifications of Expenditures by Objects." Among these materials is report on "Taxation of Real Property in Pennsylvania" by Budget Secretary Edward B. Logan (1934).

The Budget Papers of the Deputy Secretary, 1929-1937 (6 folders) {series #20.9} contains budget reports, summaries of appropriations, departmental activity reports, and legislative papers relating to biennial budgets of the Department of Property and Supplies. The Department of Justice Legal Opinions, 1939-1942 (2 folders) {series #20.11} were issued by the Department of Justice at the request of the Department of Property and Supplies. Information usually given is a cover letter requesting the opinion, the date of the opinion, name of official issuing the opinion, and the legal argument provided. Subjects covered include eligibility for vacation pay of dismissed government officials, effect of military conscription or voluntary enlistment on elected or appointed officials, whether seeds can be classified as perishable food, various legal functions of the Department of Department of Property and Supplies, powers of the Capitol Police, Public Salary Tax Act of 1939, legal uses of CCC camp buildings, Veterans' Preference Act of 1941, War Damage Corporation policies, flood relief supply payments, legal residence regulations for the director of the Civil Service Commission, Minimum Salary Law for Teachers of School Districts of the 4th Class, and the power and authority of the Milk Control Commission.

The Fire Marshall and State Police Inspection Report of the Deputy Secretary, 1939 (1 folder) {series #20.12} on state buildings was issued by the State Police and the Harrisburg City Fire Marshall to Deputy Secretary of Property and Supplies Roger T. Rowland and provides descriptions of exits, fire alarm systems, watchmen boxes, electrical wiring, fire hoses and fire extinguishers. The General Correspondence, 1939-1960 (8 cartons) {series #20.13} includes the correspondence of Secretaries of Property and Supplies Roger W. Rowland (1939-1941), James F. Torrance (1941-1943), Chester M. Woolworth (1943-1950), Alan D. Reynalds (1951-1953), Frank C. Hilton (1953-1955), William D. Thomas (1955), John S. Rice (1956), and Andrew M. Bradley (1957-1960). The General Correspondence of the Deputy Secretary, 1909-1960 (129 cartons) {series #20.14} includes the correspondence of Deputy Secretaries of Property and Supplies Samuel B. Rambo (1922-1931) and Walter G. Scott (1938-1940).

The General Correspondence of the Bureau of Real Estate and Insurance, 1929-1967 (3 folders) {series #20.15} relates to liability and surety bonds, liability insurance on motor vehicles, leases, legal opinions, worker compensation coverage, and real estate. The Bureau of Real Estate and Insurance acted on behalf of the Secretary of Property and Supplies as ex officio insurance broker of record for the Commonwealth, contracting for all insurance and bonds for all state agencies and their employees. It also contracted for the rental of offices or other accommodations for state agencies that could not be located in state office buildings and conducted appraisals and sold real estate at the direction of the General Assembly.

The Minutes of the Board of Commissioners, 1938-1940 (1 folder) {series #20.18} of Public Grounds and Buildings for December 1939 to March 1940 provides the the date of meeting, names of those present and a brief description of the business transacted. The Minutes of the Board of Review, 1942 (1 folder) {series #20.19} provide the date of meeting, name of chairman presiding, and brief description of the recommendations made by the board. The Minutes of the Executive Board, 1939 (1 folder) {series #20.20} in the administration of Governor Arthur H. James that were held in the Governor's Office on Monday, March 27, 1939 and Tuesday, April 25, 1939 include a certified copy of the actions taken on May 3, 1939 approving the bonding of certain positions in various departments, boards and commissions. In addition, there is a description of the "Powers and Rulings of the Executive Board" brought up to date as of April 1, 1939 providing standardization of qualifications, titles and salaries as well as rules governing extra compensation, leave of absence, approval of number of deputies, organization, traveling expenses, fidelity bonds and insurance, liability insurance, automobile insurance, office hours, oaths and affirmations, disposition of useless records, and allocation of certain costs. Also present is a report describing the "Reorganization of the Pennsylvania Motor Police" approved by Governor Earle on December 1, 1937.

The Minutes of Pennsylvania Bituminous Coal Producers, 1939 (1 folder) {series #20.22} document meetings held at the invitation of the Bureau of Standards in the Department of Property and Supplies on May 3, 1939 for the purpose of revising Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Specification C-33, Bituminous Coal. This is accompanied by a tentative draft of the specification of March 20, 1939 as revised at the conference; a copy of Public Law No. 48 of the 75th Congress [Chapter 127, First Session] [H.R. 4987], An Act to Regulate Interstate Commerce in Bituminous Coal, and other purposes; and the "Findings of Facts and Conclusions of the National Bituminous Coal Commission" of the United States Department of the Interior In Re: [Docket No. 15] Minimum Prices and Marketing Rules and Regulations as Proposed to the National Bituminous Coal Commission by the District Boards for Districts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8 and that part of District 13 comprising Van Buren, Warren and McMinn Counties, Tennessee, All Within Minimum Price Area 1, in Compliance with Orders Nos. 247, 248, and 251 issued by the Commission under and by virtue of the authority granted by Section 4 II (a) of the Bituminous Coal Act of 1937.

The Minutes of Pennsylvania State College, 1940-1941 (2 folders) {series #20.23} document the meetings of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of The Pennsylvania State College for 1940-1941. Information provided includes applications and admissions, reappointments of faculty members, approval of leaves and retirements, academic schedules, estimates of state funds for maintenance and operations, additional appropriations requested, operating costs, and salary restorations and increases. Also present are a brief history of the college, a list of administrative officers and general administrative agencies, descriptions of enrollment criteria, mailing list of the board of trustees, comparative balance sheets, summary of cash in various banks, and various related types of supporting materials.

The Minutes of the Turner Committee, 1933 (1 folder) {series #20.25} that met in the House Committee Room on February 16, 1933 to consider amendments to the Administrative Code contained in House Bill 22 was chaired by Elwood J. Turner and consisted of Dr. Joseph G. Steedle, P.B. Rice, A. J. White Hutton and Arthur P. Townsend. Those testifying before the committee were John L. Hanna, Secretary of the Department of Property and Supplies; Deputy Secretary Walter G. Scott; Office Director P.W. Kearney; Director of Publications John R. Hood; and Director of Standards and Purchases F.H. Mason. Subjects discussed include the proposed elimination of the State Art Commission, departmental purchasing limits, automobile insurance, formation of a new executive board, and methods used in purchasing supplies.

The Miscellaneous Reports of the Department and Other State Agencies, 1930-1943, 1958 (20 folders, 10 volumes) {series #20.26} concern a variety of subjects including the Local Government Committee, General State Authority, the Research and Records Program, Bureau of Publications, Capitol Grounds Extension, the Delaware River Basin Commission, Eastern State Penitentiary, Executive Mansion, Aerial Defense, Public Utility Commission, State Art Commission, and the Work Program of the Works Progress Administration. The Report of the History, Purposes, and Activities of the Joint State Government Commission, 1940 (1 volume) {series #20.28} was prepared for the Pennsylvania General Assembly by Alfred A. Wasserman, Director of the Joint State Government Commission. Created by the Act of July 1, 1937 (PL 2460) and amended by the Act of June 26, 1939 (PL 1084), the Joint State Government Commission was a fact finding commission composed of senators and representatives charged with making recommendations concerning the problems of government.

The Survey of Office Space, 1933 (14 folders) {series #20.31} contains survey forms of office space in state office buildings located in Harrisburg and Pittsburgh. Information provided is date survey was done, name or location of building, room number, total cubic footage and square footage of the room, number of windows, present use, cubic footage per person, and a list and description of the furnishings present. The United States Civil Service Commission Guidelines Relative to the Hatch Act, 1940 (1 folder) {series #20.32} were issued by the United States Civil Service Commission concerning the Hatch Act passed on August 2, 1939. The Hatch Act was designed to regulate the relationship between federal agencies and political campaigns by prohibiting using any public funds designated for public relief or public works from being used for the election of candidates to political office. It also prevented any officials paid with federal funds from using promises of jobs, job promotions, financial assistance, or contracts to entice or coerce campaign contributions or any other type of political support. An amendment passed on July 19, 1940 extended these prohibitions to state and local employees whose salary included any federal funds. These guidelines setting out certain rulings regarding general prohibitions and applicability to various state departments and commissions were officially released on September 22, 1940 and sent from United States Attorney General Claude T. Reno to Secretary of the Department of Property and Supplies Roger T. Rowland.

The Construction Plans and Specifications for Public Buildings and Bridges, 1893-1975 (7 drawers, 150 folders) {series #20.35} include plans for a great many buildings constructed across Pennsylvania during the era of the New Deal. The General Correspondence, 1902-1905, 1924-1953 (20 folders) {series #20.36} relates to bridges, building demolition approvals, petitions for appointment of viewers for bridges, card files on replacement and restoration, and records relating to surplus land sales. Among the materials are the specifications for a highway bridge across the North Branch of the Susquehanna River between the boroughs of Berwick and Nescopec, and files relating to the Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial Bridge, the Labor and Industry Building, the South Office Building No. 2, and the exhibition building at the 1940 New York Worlds Fair.

Record Group 22: Records of the Department of Education

The Administrative Correspondence, 1937-1979 (69 cartons) {series #22.1} of the Secretary of Education includes annual reports, special studies, major committee and conference records, federal program data, speeches, and reference copies of minutes. The Bureau of School Administration that existed in the old Department of Public Instruction until 1945 consisted of the Divisions of Child Accounting and Research, School Plant, Consolidation and Transportation, and School Business. Among the records crated by this Bureau was the Historic Properties File, 1931-1945 (4 boxes) {series #22.5} that contains maintenance and repair records for the historic properties administered by the Pennsylvania Historical Commission which was overseen by the Department of Education from 1929-1945. The files typically include correspondence, agreements, proposals, plans, and photographs. Properties documented by the collection include the Brig Niagara, Cornwall Iron Furnace, Drake Well, Ephrata Cloister, Fort Augusta, Fort LeBoeuf, Governor Printz Park, John Morton Homestead, State Museum Building, Old Economy Village, and Pennsbury Manor. For related materials see the corresponding administrative materials relating to historical properties and the State Museum located in the Records of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (RG-13) .

Created in 1915, the Board of Censors (Motion Picture) was composed of three members appointed by the governor to examine and supervise the examination by others of all films exhibited in Pennsylvania to ensure compliance with proper "moral standards." The Board was specifically charged with preventing the display of any motion picture film judged to be sacrilegious, obscene, indecent, or immoral or as might tend, in the judgment of the Board, to debase or corrupt community morals. The Board was abolished in 1956. The Applications for Examination, 1915-1951 (4 boxes) {series #22.25} were submitted by motion picture film companies requesting the Board of Censors to review their films. The application gives the title of the film; the name of the manufacturer; the names of the leading actors and actresses; the number and length of reels; the style of film and indicates whether the film was approved without changes, approved with eliminations, or condemned outright. If the film was approved with eliminations, an Eliminations Form is attached and lists the specific changes that needed to be made. There is often also present a Memorandum of Changes form that reveals when requested eliminations or changes were made and when the Board approved the film. Some applications have copies of the script attached.

The Daily Minutes, 1939-1956 (3 boxes) {series #22.26} document the activities of Board of Censors reviewers. Information contained in the minutes provides the name and manufacturer of the motion picture that was reviewed, whether the film was approved without change, approved with eliminations, or condemned. If the film was approved with changes or condemned the reason and required revisions are given. The minutes also provide information on contacts with film manufacturers who appealed the review of films by the Board of Censors. The General Correspondence, 1924-1956 (1 box) {series #22.27} received and sent by the Board of Censors includes a few legal briefs, press releases and movie reviews. Correspondents include Special Deputy Attorney General Abraham Levy, members of the general the public, members of the clergy, motion picture companies, officials from Pennsylvania state government agencies, and officials from agencies in other states such as Ohio, New York and Maryland.
The Legal Briefs, 1915-1921, 1928-1940 (3 folders) {series #22.28} contain appeals, replies, briefs, orders and correspondence filed by motion picture companies, the State Board of Censors, the attorney general and the courts in matters regarding the denial of the release of films by the Board of Censors. The Reports, 1925-1951. (3 folders) {series #22.29} consist of annual reports submitted by the Board concerning prosecutions, the sale of substituted approval seals, budget allotments, the number of movie reels examined, the number of field inspections, lists of appeals, the number of films certified, and the number of eliminations and disapprovals.

The Rules, Procedures and Forms, 1915-1956 (1 box) {series #22.30} contains a wide variety of documents providing insight into the Board's operating procedures. Among the materials present are a list of fines assessed on movie theaters for showing films that were not edited to meet the Board's requirements or did not show the Board's seal of approval and Certificates of Censorship that were the official forms sent to the manufacturer to indicate if a film had been approved, approved with eliminations, or not approved. Information provided is the film's title, name of manufacturer, and the number of reels and date certificate was issued. Also present is a Record of Violations, 1939-1949, that lists fines issued to each manufacturer giving the film's title, location where shown, and the date of the violation and copies of Rule and Regulations, 1915-1950, containing copies of acts, rules, mission statements, legal briefs and correspondence.

Among the: Records of theSuperintendent of Public Instruction is the Correspondence of the Post-War Education Committee of the State Council of Education and the Post-War Planning Commission, 1943-1947 (9 folders) {series #22.99} that contains correspondence, memoranda, reports, and plans and procedures that outline the organization, responsibilities, activities and goals of the Post-War Planning Commission and the Post-War Education Committee. Topics addressed include funding, literacy, vocational training, memorials, counseling, employment, school facilities, and readjustment of veterans and civilians to a peacetime economy. Also present is the Superintendent's General and Administrative Correspondence, 1936-1964 (8 cartons) {series #22.102} containing reports and various other committee and conference records.

The Journals of Meetings and Annual Reports of the State Council of Education, 1938, 1941-1961 (16 volumes) {series #22.103} contain agendas and minutes of the meetings and the annual reports giving the dates of the meetings and the legal fields of responsibility for the Council. Information provided by the minutes includes the date, time and location of the meeting; a list of the names of members present; and a synopsis of the topics discussed during the meeting. Topics of discussion include annexations, county and state plans, curriculum, teacher and program certification, school buildings, research projects, funding, vocational education, policies, and teacher education.

The Minutes, Correspondence, and Exhibits Relating to the Investigation of the Department of Public Instruction by the Joint Legislative Committee on Finances, 1932-1934 (2 boxes) {series #22.106} concern departmental organization, functions performed, and staff salaries, teacher salaries, teacher preparation colleges, costs of maintaining school buildings; and school funding. The Minutes (Journals) of the State Council of Education and the State Board of Vocational Education, 1944, 1953-1963 (2 cartons) {series #22.107} document the proceedings of the State Council of Education and the State Board for Vocational Education. Topics of discussion include county educational plans, annexations, school sites, curriculum, teacher education, higher education, certification, funding, research projects, and legislation. The One Room School File, 1932-1938 (7 folders) {series #22.110} is a record of permits issued by the Department of Public Instruction to school districts granting permission to continue using a one room school. Information provided from the permit includes the name of the secretary of the school district, the name and county of the school district, the name of the school permitted, and the school year. In addition, the nine conditions that the school must meet to remain certified are listed. Also found in the record is a list of schools for which permits had been granted for their continuance after having been closed because they failed to meet the required average daily attendance of ten or more students.
The Reports of Degree Granting Institutions to the State Council of Education, 1938 (8 cartons) {series #22.116} contains various types of reports submitted by each degree granting institution to the Department of Public Instruction. The reports of the Dean of Women and Dean of Men include information on student housing, staff, the nature of guidance counseling offered, extra-curricular activities, and scholarships given. The report of the Director of Student Health includes information on organization, facilities, staff, services and patients. The report of the Treasurer includes information on income, expenditures, finances, and recapitulation. The report of the Superintendent of Building and Grounds includes information on the number of acres owned, number of buildings and their purposes, laboratories, fire hazards, and needed improvements. The report of the Director of Student Teaching includes information on the number of master teachers and their experience, expenditures for training, number of student teachers, and requirements for student teaching. The report of the Dean of Arts and Sciences includes information on curriculum offerings, and degrees conferred. The report of the Librarian includes information on personnel, holdings, use of library, and financial support. The report of the Registrar includes information on admission requirements, distribution of students (by division), graduation requirements, and career placement services. The report of the President includes the purpose of the school's existence, institutional philosophy, the needs of the institution, staff levels, and retirement benefits. There are also Faculty Information Blanks for each member of the faculty which includes name, sex, department, subjects taught, rank, education, experience, salary, teaching load, and publications completed.

The Records of Department Superintendents, 1932-1933, 1935-1964 (12 cartons) {series #22.117} includes transcripts of speeches, correspondence, minutes, and reports. The majority of the documents date from the administration of Francis Haas, 1939-1955. Other superintendents represented are James Rule, 1932-1933; Lester Kade, 1935-1939, and Charles Boehm, 1956-1964. Some of the items contained include the reports of county superintendents, 1948-1954; reports of higher institutions of learning, 1936-1945; and other reports on area college centers, library activities during World War II, and the Investigation of Mansfield State College. Topics discussed in the correspondence include Work Projects Administration (W.P.A.) activities, William Penn Commemoration Commission, Committee on Post High School Education, Mansfield State Teacher's College, national defense, legislation, State Board of Education, and the United States Department of Education. The School District Annexation and Appropriation File, 1924-1966 (18 cartons) {series #22.120} contains correspondence, requisitions, court documents, agreements, financial statements, reports, petitions, and hearing minutes relating to proposals for and opposition against creating new school districts, school construction, and the location of new schools.

Record Group 23: Records of the Department of Public Welfare

The Child Welfare Institution Historic Files, 1922-1965 (2 cartons) {series #23.9} contain reports, hearing transcripts, notes, and memoranda on juvenile delinquency and child welfare. Among the materials are a report from the Committee on Delinquency of the Joint State Government Commission (1948), documentation on the departmental administrative advisory boards and commissions, notes on government responsibility for detention of children, and letters and reports concerning incarcerated children. The State Supervised Hospitals' History File, 1914-1973 (12 cartons) {series #23.10} contains reports of inspections of hospitals that received state funding. Included in this series are correspondence, copies of disaster plans and personnel policies, inspection reports, notes of inspectors, fire inspection reports, hospital by-laws, and photographs. Inspection reports provide the following information: the date the hospital was organized, names of owners of the hospital, names of the medical and administrative staff, and assessments of the quality of the social service department, business office, nurses' station, and the surgical and obstetrical departments. Also found is retention information, an evaluation of the adequacy of medical record-keeping, the condition of the operating room, the types of patient rooms available, and the names of board members. Correspondence often provides information concerning code violations and the corrective measures taken. Among the many hospitals mentioned are Rolling Hill, Shadyside, Tri-County, Carlisle, Kane Summit Stetson, F.W. Black Community, Adrian and Allegheny Valley.

The Audits of Hospitals and Correctional Institutions, 1923-1949 (35 boxes) {series #23.350} contains audit reports of hospitals and correctional institutions in Pennsylvania that were conducted by the Auditor General and by private firms. The reports are grouped by category into medical and surgical, mental, feeble-minded, penal and correctional, and miscellaneous. In addition to the audit findings, this series also contains general correspondence concerning each of the institutions audited. The audits provide information on each institution's organizational structure and personnel, assets, liabilities and capital, operating income, operating expenses, a commentary on programs, and "schedule" statements detailing various aspects of facility operations. Most correspondence concerning the audits were requests by the Secretary of Welfare for the institution's boards of directors to answer concerns addressed in the audit and the responses given by the respective boards. Among the institutions audited are the Pennsylvania Soldiers' and Sailors' Home in Erie, Selinsgrove State Colony for Epileptics, Western State Penitentiary, Torrance State Hospital, Laurelton State Village, Norristown State Hospital and Coaldale State Hospital. The Reports on County Homes, 1917-1935 (6 boxes) {series #23.352} concern inspections conducted by field representatives of the Bureau of Assistance and submitted to the Secretary of Welfare to facilitate the preparation of recommendations to the county homes. Also present is inter-office and inter-agency correspondence. Information given in each report includes the name of the institution, the city and county where located, the name of the field representative conducting the inspection, a statistical breakdown of the institutional population, the names and titles of institutional officers and personnel, information concerning the facilities and grounds, findings concerning fire protection and administrative issues, and Committee recommendations.

The Reports on County Poor Relief, 1932-1939 (3 boxes) {series #23.353} were compiled by field representatives of the Bureau of Assistance and submitted to the Secretary of Welfare to assist in preparing recommendations to the Directors of the Poor of each county. The reports consist of evaluations of county homes and almshouses, the number of children in foster care, and the status of children's programs. The type of information provided includes the names, titles, and salaries of staff; population statistics; information concerning plant and equipment; and an evaluation of the care and treatment of residents. Also present are weekly menus, newspapers articles, and reports on investigations undertaken as a result of complaints received.

The State Emergency Relief Board was created by the Act of August 19, 1932, (P.L. 88) to plan and develop a comprehensive program for administering state and federal relief funds during the Great Depression. Chaired by the Governor, the Board consisted of the Lieutenant Governor, Auditor General, State Treasurer and the Speaker of the House, the Attorney General and Secretary of Welfare served as advisory members. Before direct federal relief grants were discontinued on December 1, 1935, the Board acted as a federal agency directly carrying out programs to administer unemployment relief. Later, relief efforts were administered by local county and regional boards approved by the state Board with the treasurer responsible for disbursing funds to the counties. The State Emergency Relief Board was discontinued in 1937. The Bulletins, 1934-1937 (3 volumes) {series #23.354} of the State Emergency Relief Board were issued by the office manager in Harrisburg to all employees of the Emergency Relief Board. Subjects include holidays, changes in office hours, bowling league, Department of Justice rulings, and office policies on long distance calls and care of typewriters. Telegraph bulletins were messages issued from Harrisburg to the counties that generally deal with termination of federal projects, special statistical reports, and payrolls. Executive bulletins (labeled simply bulletins in this series) were issued by the Executive Director in Harrisburg and concern such topics as office hours, inventories, administrative expenses, holidays, and policies concerning use of automobiles.

The Circular Letters, 1935-1937 (2 volumes) {series #23.355} are an incomplete collection of Civilian Conservation Corps circulars providing information on eligibility requirements, progress toward reaching racial quotas and planning. Also present are circular letters issued by various officers in Harrisburg to the county boards covering such topics as personnel matters, postage, rent, vacations and budgets. The series entitled Flow Charts, [undated.] (1 volume) {series #23.356} document the work flow through county offices. The charts provide information about the activities of the county comptroller, cash relief, direct relief, rent relief, and the administrative payroll. Each chart is identified by a form number and contains the names of the officers who were in charge of the process. Also present is a report prepared by the Social Service Exchange Committee and by the Association of Community Chests and Councils entitled "Emergency Set-Up for Social Service Exchange or Central Index, 1932."

The Manuals, 1934-1937 (8 volumes) {series #23.357} were issued by the Work Division of the State Emergency Relief Board and contain general rules and regulations for the New Work Program, purchasing procedures, disbursing relief, administrative expenditures, procedures for paying team, truck and equipment rentals and policies concerning invoices and purchase vouchers. Also present is an internally indexed procedure manual on the thrift garden program in 1935, procedures used in maintaining commitment and appropriation requisition registers, procedures for authorizing distribution of cod liver oil, procedures for operating shelters for transients, office supply procedures, and procedures for granting rent relief. Miscellaneous other manuals provide procedures for starting a shoe repair program, distributing federal commodities, guidelines for operating district offices, payroll instructions, policies concerning cash relief, and statistical charts.

The Memoranda, 1934-1937 (13 volumes) {series #23.358} were issued by the Work Division providing interpretations of formerly issued operating instructions, monthly reports, information on direct relief, a summary of the work relief program as it related to the relief division, and segregation of the emergency education program projects and the curtailing work projects. Also present is a set of memoranda originally issued to transient bureaus and camps addressing vacancies in the camps, boxing and wrestling matches, inventories, use of whole and raw milk, laundering of blankets, and publication of newsletters. The remainder of the memoranda (1-946) are addressed primarily to county executive directors and local and regional comptrollers concerning payment irregularities, 1934 income tax returns, selection of workers for educational projects, policies regarding Workmen's Compensation insurance for administrative employees, regional budget requests, and commodity requisitions. The Minutes, 1932-1937 (2 boxes) {series #23.359} contain information on discussions county expenditures of Emergency Board funds, special allocations, insurance, clothing allotments, warehousing, clothing committee reports, and reports on malnutrition and thrift gardens. Also present is information concerning the operations of the County Poor Boards, the rent relief program, problems faced by veterans, Workmen's Compensation insurance, the work relief expense fund, and procurement and distribution policies. Some of the earlier minutes also include copies of news releases issued by Governor Pinchot.

The Department of Public Assistance was established by an act of the legislature in 1937 to take over duties formerly performed by the State Emergency Relief Administration and the Bureau of Assistance. Local emergency relief boards and other boards administering assistance were combined into one board of assistance that was placed under the Department of Public Assistance. From this time, all hiring fell under state civil service rules. The Department was abolished in 1958 and its responsibilities merged with those of the Department of Public Welfare. The Bulletins, 1939-1959 (1 volume) {series #23.360} were issued to Department of Public Assistance staff concerning such topics as customer service, parking, outgoing mail policies, the civil defense plan, parking regulations, civil service announcements, the motor pool, and policies concerning hotel charges, Christmas trees, and telephone calls. The Circular Letters, 1937-1942 (2 volumes) {series #23.361} concern Civilian Conservation Corps program enrollment procedures, statistical breakdowns of state enrollment, and routine directives concerning program operations.
The Employees' Manuals, 1938-1949 (5 volumes) {series #23.362} for the Department of Public Assistance contain policies regarding public assistance eligibility, procedures for granting assistance, guidelines for granting pensions for the blind, background on national assistance programs, information concerning cooperation between state agencies and local agencies, statistical reporting procedures, forms to be used, cash disbursement procedures, guidelines for assistance to military personnel, budgeting, and the hospitalization benefit program. The General Correspondence, 1942-1946 (1 folder){series #23.363} includes newsletters, correspondence, brochures, and civil service bulletins relating to personnel matters, a conference of the civil service assembly, restrictions on federal appointments in accordance with the War Manpower Commission, wage classifications for employment and evaluation of employment positions. The Handbook of Assistance, 1937 (1 volume) {series #23.364} contains regulations and procedures used by local boards and staff in administering public assistance programs. Issued for the period from June 1937 through November 1937, this handbook was superseded by the Employees' Manuals, 1938-1949 (5 volumes) {series #23.362} . Topics include personnel policies, assistance eligibility policies, application and investigation procedures, local board decisions, appeal procedures, funeral payments, accounting and auditing procedures, and policies concerning statistical reporting by the local boards. The Handbook of Procedures, 1939-1951 (3 volumes) {series #23.365} for county assistance offices that accompanied the Employees' Manual covers such topics as procedures for maintaining application files, case files, active assistance files, and administrative files including maintenance and property records, procedures for preparing budget requests, personnel policies, personnel classifications, state civil service rules, payroll management procedures, office procurement procedures, and instruction in managing relief work projects.
The Memoranda, 1942-1943, 1951-1959 (2 volumes) {series #23.366} were issued by Executive Directors of the Department of Public Assistance concern and concern departmental policies and procedures. The Minutes of the State Board of Public Assistance, 1938-1959 (1 carton) {series #23.367} that consisted of the State Treasurer, Auditor General and seven other members appointed by the Governor document the approval of rules, regulations and standards recommended by local assistance boards and the Department of Public Assistance concerning assistance eligibility. The Board also recommended changes to the assistance laws and in the Governor's administrative policies. The Board began meeting in 1937 but the minutes for the first year are missing. Topics discussed include residency and other eligibility requirements, hospitalization, food raised in gardens, policies concerning the physically and mentally infirm and on lone recipients who eat in restaurants, eligibility of able-bodied unmarried men, policies concerning farm employment, and public assistance payment schedules.

The Procedural Manuals, 1933-1943, [undated] (11 volumes) {series #23.368} relating to the federal programs include a federal brochure entitled Fair Employment Practice Committee, How It Operates (1941); War Manpower Commission publications entitled Information concerning Manning Tables (to keep track of labor force) (1942), Instructions for Preparation of the Replacement Schedule (systematic job replacement of men who went to war), and Employment Stabilization Plan, Lancaster Area, 1943-44. Also present is a bulletin from the Philadelphia County Board of Assistance, a wartime personnel management pamphlet, a pamphlet on daycare of children of working mothers issued by the United States Employment Service, and Manpower: A Manual of Control of Employment Practices Selective Service Regulations, Non-Deferrable Occupations. The Public Welfare History File, 1937-1952 (1 box, 1 carton) {series #23.369} contains letters sent from Harrisburg to executive directors of county assistance offices and other county staff documenting the evolution of welfare policies and procedures over time. Subjects include the Civilian Defense Program, the types of forms to be used in administering relief programs, awards and contracts for supplies, personnel appointments, medical assistance, Works Progress Administration assignments, and burial assistance policies. The Reports, 1937-1938 (3 volumes) {series #23.370} document strategies for providing public relief to destitute Pennsylvanians. The report dated November 16, 1937 is a response by a Mr. de Schweintz to changes in the State strategy that were ordered by a Mrs. Emma Jeffrey Miller. The second report dated December 16, 1937 was issued by the Governor's Relief Survey Committee and a report dated January 3, 1938 is a commentary on the Governor's Relief Survey Committee Report.

The Audits of Hospitals and Correctional Institutions, 1923-1949 (35 boxes) {series #23.350} consists of audit reports of hospitals and correctional institutions in Pennsylvania that were conducted by the Auditor General and by private firms. The reports are grouped by category into medical and surgical, mental, feeble-minded, penal and correctional, and miscellaneous. In addition to the audit findings, this series also contains general correspondence concerning each of the institutions audited. The audits provide information on each institution's organizational structure and personnel, assets, liabilities and capital, operating income, operating expenses, a commentary on programs, and "schedule" statements detailing various aspects of facility operations. Most correspondence concerning the audits are requests by the Secretary of Welfare for the institution's boards of directors to answer concerns addressed in the audit and the responses given by the respective boards. Among the institutions audited are the Pennsylvania Soldiers' and Sailors' Home in Erie, Selinsgrove State Colony for Epileptics, Western State Penitentiary, Torrance State Hospital, Laurelton State Village, Norristown State Hospital and Coaldale State Hospital.

The Bureau of Community Work within the old Department of Welfare was responsible, in cooperation with the Bureau of Public Assistance, for inspecting county homes, evaluating county efforts at providing poor relief, and in carrying out the directives of the State Emergency Relief Board in finding work for the unemployed. The Reports on County Homes, 1917-1935 (6 boxes) {series #23.352} are reports of inspections conducted by field representatives of the Bureau of Assistance and submitted to the Secretary of Welfare to facilitate the preparation of recommendations to the county homes. Also present is inter-office and inter-agency correspondence. Information given in each report includes the name of the institution, the city and county where located, the name of the field representative conducting the inspection, a statistical breakdown of the institutional population, the names and titles of institutional officers and personnel, information concerning the facilities and grounds, findings concerning fire protection and administrative issues, and Committee recommendations. The Reports on County Poor Relief, 1932-1939 (3 boxes) {series #23.353} were compiled by field representatives of the Bureau of Assistance and submitted to the Secretary of Welfare to assist in preparing recommendations to the Directors of the Poor of each county. The reports consist of evaluations of county homes and almshouses, the number of children in foster care, and the status of children's programs. Information found consists of the names, titles, and salaries of staff; population statistics; information concerning plant and equipment; and an evaluation of the care and treatment of residents. Also present are weekly menus, newspapers articles, and reports on investigations undertaken as a result of complaints received.

Record Group 25: Records of Special Commissions

The records of temporary independent commissions have been placed in one record group. These commissions were temporary since they were created to perform a specific function and then go out of existence. They were independent in that they were not established as a dependent commission under the purview of an on-going executive department. As can be readily ascertained from their names, these commissions were formed to serve primarily as investigatory or planning bodies or as vehicles to erect public monuments and promote the official commemoration of historic events. Their life spans were determined by the amount of time required for them to fulfill their purposes. The typical commission consisted of some combination of private citizens appointed by the Governor, members from either or both the House and Senate, the Speaker of the House, the President pro-tempore of the Senate, and certain heads of state agencies whose functions were related to the purpose for which the commission was created. Special commissions generally met upon the call of their chairmen or presidents and operated under a set of prescribed rules and regulations. Special commissions generally submitted final written reports on their activities to the Governor and the General Assembly. The New Deal era was particularly a productive period for creating commemorative special commissions.

The Committee to Celebrate the Anniversary of the Battle of Bushy Run was actually instituted prior to the arrival of the Great Depression by Act 164 of the General Assembly passed on on June 7, 1927 and amended by Act 175 of 1929. The Bushy Run Battlefield Commission consisted of the Secretary of the Department of Forests and Waters, the Chairman and Secretary of the Pennsylvania Historical Commission and six persons residing in the vicinity of Bushy Run State Park. Act 398 of 1927 provided for acquisition and maintenance by the Department of Forests and Waters of the Bushy Run Battlefield and adjacent lands for a historical park and for erection of a monument. The purpose of the Committee was to commemorate the 175th anniversary of the battle that took place there on August 5th and 6th, 1763 in which Colonel Henry Bouquet defeated an alliance of Delawares, Shawnees, Mingoes, Wyandots, Mohicans, Miamis and Ottowas led by Ottowa Chief Pontiac. Colonel Bouquet's victory broke the back of the Indian uprising that had been occasioned by the failure of the English to withdraw from the western forts after their defeat of the French during the French and Indian War. The records generated by this committee include Acceptances, 1938 (1 folder) {series #25.12} containing letters accepting or declining invitations to attend dedication ceremonies for the monument erected at the Bushy Run battlefield; Committee Correspondence, 1938 (1 folder){series #25.170} containing drawings relating to the erection of a monument at the site of the Bushy Run battlefield and for the 175th anniversary dedication ceremonies sponsored by the Pennsylvania Federation of Historical Societies that were held on August 6, 1938; General Correspondence, 1938 (1 folder) {series #25.13} and photographs relating to the 175th anniversary dedication ceremonies held on August 6, 1938; Programs and Form Letters, 1938 (1 folder) {series #25.14} relating to the dedication ceremonies; and the Publicity File, 1938 (1 folder) {series #25.15} containing correspondence and Pittsburgh Sun-Telegraph newspaper clippings relating to the 175th anniversary dedication ceremony.

The Delaware Tercentenary Commission chaired by Christopher L. Ward was created to celebrate the tercentenary of the first Swedish settlement in the Delaware Bay. The justification put forth for Pennsylvania's involvement was that the creation of civil government and courts on the lower Delaware and establishment of the first churches there directly influenced the course of government and religious life in Pennsylvania. Similarly, construction by the Swedish settlers in the Delaware Valley of log houses and their importation of European cattle helped shape the subsequent development of domestic architecture and farming practices in what became southeastern Pennsylvania. The General Correspondence, 1936-1938 (1 folder) {series #25.20} is primarily that of Chairman Frank Melvin of the Pennsylvania Historical Commission with members of the Delaware Tercentenary Commission, the American Scandinavian Foundation, Camden County Chamber of Commerce, and the United States Senate. Information provided is name of correspondent, date of correspondence, reasons for Pennsylvania participating in the Delaware tercentenary commemoration, specific proposals for events, and names of individuals to serve on the Pennsylvania Tercentenary Commission. Included are schedules prepared by the Swedish American Tercentenary Association in Chicago for the visit of Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf and Crown Princess Louise of Sweden to Wilmington on June 27-30, 1938 and the names and addresses of the members appointed to the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission. The brochures are Delaware Tercentenary Bulletin No. 1 (April, 1937), Delaware Tercentenary Bulletin No. 2 (June, 1937), and The Workers' Bulletin, Official Tercentenary Information Published by the American Tercentenary Association (Chicago: March 7, 1938). Also present is a copy of The Swedish American Delaware Tercentenary by Wollmar F. Bostrom, Minister of Sweden to the United States (1938).

Governor George H. Earle appointed the Pennsylvania Constitution Commemoration Committee in 1937 to arrange for an appropriate celebration in June 1938 of the 150th anniversary of the adoption of the United States Constitution. The Committee consisted of 1,792 members representing all 67 counties. The Commonwealth was divided into six regions, each having an honorary chairman, a general chairman and an executive committee chairman. County chairmen of each region acted as the executive committee. On July 26, 1937 the Pennsylvania Constitution Commemoration Committee formally opened its headquarters in the Pennsylvania Building at 15th and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia. The Accounts, 1937-1938 (6 folders) {series #25.49} contain payrolls and requisitions for payment, receipts and correspondence concerning payments made on behalf of the Pennsylvania Constitution Commemoration Committee. Information provided is name of person to be paid, charge account, and amount paid. Extensive correspondence is present concerning payments to George Grossman and Albert Mordell and others for writing the history of the committee and receipts for leasing office space and equipment. The Articles and Sketches, 1937 (1 folder) {series #25.50} concern figures connected with the Constitution as David Grier, George Washington, George Clymer, Hyam Solomon, William Wilson, Dr. James McHenry, Dr. Hugh Williamson, and Dr. James McClurg. The Committee Records Inventory, 1938 (1 folder) {series #25.51} was compiled by Committee Chairman Albert M. Greenfield of the records in the Philadelphia office of the Constitution Commission that were turned over to Frank W. Melvin when the office was closed on December 31, 1938.

The General Correspondence, 1935-1938 (11 boxes, 6 folders) {series #25.52} relating to the activities of the Constitution Commemoration Commission documents how the effort unfolded. The General Plan for Statewide Commemoration, 1937 (1 folder) {series #25.53} contains the "General Plan for State Wide Commemoration of Sesquicentennial Anniversary of the Framing, Ratification and Establishment of the Constitution of the United States by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Including Proposal for a Commonwealth Program at Philadelphia During the 'Constitution Week' of September 12 to 17, 1937" prepared and submitted by Pennsylvania Historical Commission by Chairman Frank W. Melvin, May 20, 1937. The report contains the history and legislation of the Commonwealth plan, a description of the Pennsylvania Celebration Commission and staff, activities of the Pennsylvania Historical Commission in organizing the celebration, an overview of the sub-committees and their functions, dates designated for state and local programs, an allotment of state funds and suggestions of activities for local programs.

The Legislation, 1936-1938 (1 folder) {series #25.54} includes the Act 26 (July 22, 1936) providing for participation of Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in National Celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the framing, signing and ratification by Pennsylvania and the final adoption of the Constitution of the United States of America together with supplementary bills. Among the supplementary legislation is House Bill 1980 referred to Committee on Appropriations on March 22, 1937, Senate Bill 855 amended on second reading in Senate on May 6, 1937, Senate Bill 855 reported from Committee on Education in House of Representatives on May 20, 1937, Senate Bill 860 as re-reported from Committee on Appropriations in Senate on May 18, 1937, House Bill 1980 referred to House Bill 1184 referred to Committee on State Government on March 2, 1937, House Bill 1367 referred to Committee on Forestry on March 9, 1937, House Bill 1368 referred to Committee on Forestry on March 9, 1937, and Act 239 providing for creation of a legal holiday on September 17, 1937 known and observed as Constitution Day. Also present is related correspondence, telegrams, and resolutions.

The Mailing Lists, 1936-1938 (4 folders) {series #25.55} provide the names and addresses of various citizens' committees connected with the United States Constitution Commemoration. The committees include the Philadelphia Committee, Philadelphia Programs Committee, Township Chairmen for Pittsburgh Area, Rabbinical Council, Church Councils, Century-and-a-Half Old Institutions and Business Houses in Philadelphia, Centenary Firms, historical societies of Pennsylvania, Diocesan Schools of Philadelphia and Harrisburg, religious orders, women's societies, Swedish-American Societies, public high schools of Pennsylvania, and Boy Scout Councils. The Minutes of the Executive, Regional, and Special Committees, [ca. 1937-1938] (2 folders) {series #25.56} concerns the regional committees located in Pittsburgh, Erie, Williamsport, Wilkes-Barre, Harrisburg, Schuylkill County, Carbon County, Pike County, Wyoming County, and Philadelphia. Special meetings served conferences of schools and churches in the Philadelphia region, Essay Judges Meeting, and Philadelphia Women's Committee Meetings. Information provided is dates of meetings, names of those present, and description of business transacted. Included are organizational charts, names and addresses of members of each committee, and meeting agendas.

The Pamphlets, 1937-1938 (1 folder) {series #25.57} were published in connection with the United States Constitution Commemoration. The Press Releases, 1937-1938 (2 folders) {series #25.58} include publicity posters and related publicity items. The Proclamations, 1936 (1 folder) {series #25.59} include proclamations, telegrams and correspondence related to the activities. The Publications, 1937 (2 folders) {series #25.60} include several versions of Pennsylvania and the Constitution of the United States, An Outline of Suggestions to Schools for the Development of Programs Appropriate to the Observance of the Event prepared by the Department of Public Instruction (Harrisburg: 1937) and the final draft of A Dramatization of the Federal Convention of 1787 prepared by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia: 1937). The Publicity and News Clippings, 1936-1938 (7 boxes, 32 folders) {series #25.61} cover proclamations, planning and public events related to the United States Constitution Commemoration. Information provided is date of new clipping, descriptions of the unfolding events connected with the commemoration, names of persons involved, and occasional photographs of events or persons connected with the commemoration.
The Reports, [ca. 1937-1938] (2 folders) {series #25.62} include some correspondence, transcripts of legislation, outline plans for sesquicentennial celebration, and miscellaneous records relating to the celebration. Among these are lists of the names of organizations receiving copies of proclamations and number of copies sent to each, activities report submitted to Chairman Albert M. Greenfield on November 5, 1937, and an alphabetical listing of the names of those seated at the dinner held at the Benjamin Franklin Hotel in Philadelphia on September 17, 1937. Included are lists of the names and addresses of all executive committee members, a publicity report, a radio report, and some budgetary papers. Also present is a final published Activities Report, Pennsylvania Commemoration Committee by Albert M. Greenfield (July 21, 1938).

The Research Notes, 1937-1938 (1 folder) {series #25.63} provide such information as the names of all of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, Constitution of the United States and deputies of the Constitutional Convention who did not sign. Also present are background information on commemoration, proclamations, list of relevant senate and house bills and the actions taken on each, names and addresses of historical societies belonging to the Federation of Historical Organizations listed by county, list of county committees, and a history of the sesquicentennial celebration for the constitution. There is, in addition, a copy of High Courts of the World and Their Powers prepared by Director General Sol. Bloom of the United States Constitution Sesquicentennial Commission. The Speeches, 1937-1938 (1 folder) {series #25.64} were delivered by Director General Sol Bloom of the United States Constitution Sesquicentennial Commission, Chairman Albert M. Greenfield of the Pennsylvania Constitution Commemoration Commission, Judge of the Court of Common Pleas #7 James C. Crumlish, Governor George H. Earle, General Secretary J. Kirkwood Craig, and Judge G. Malcolm McDonald. Also present are transcripts of several radio talk shows relating to the commemoration.

Created by Act 546 passed by the General Assembly on July 2, 1937, the Pennsylvania State World's Fair Commission consisted of five citizens appointed by the Governor who were charged with organizing Pennsylvania's participation in the World's Fair held in New York City in 1939. Chaired by Huberta P. Earle and with Irwin D. Wolf serving as Secretary, the Commission arranged for exhibits that displayed the agricultural, industrial, coal mining, scenic, and historical aspects of the Commonwealth and also cooperated with state government agencies and private interest groups in arranging exhibits. Under Act 5 approved on February 10, 1939, the membership was increased from five to fourteen members and an additional appropriation approved to continue the exhibition through 1940. The Commission worked through the Department of Property and Supplies to lease space for the exhibits and erect a proper building.

The Agreements, 1938-1940 (2 folders) {series #25.65} and related correspondence, drawings and photographs relating to Pennsylvania's participation in the 1939 New York World's Fair includes a 1938 State Participation Agreement between the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the New York World's Fair 1939 Incorporated and a copy of Act 546 creating the World's Fair Commission. The Allocation Records, 1939 (1 folder) {series #25.66} are financial allocation reports of the State World's Fair Commission for the period ending August 31, 1939. Information provided is a brief description of project for which funds were allocated, the allocation of anticipated costs, amount actually charged, and amount paid. Also present are a summary of allocation commitments as of April 10, 1939, a financial statement of appropriations, allocations and obligations for April 5, 1939, and a tentative allocation summary dated March 18, 1939. The Daily Reports and Memoranda, [ca. 1939-1940] (1 folder) {series #25.67} include correspondence and memoranda reporting on daily progress of work by various companies and workmen on the Pennsylvania exhibits. A daily construction report maintained by the Department of Property and Supplies documents the completion of each phase.

The Display Items, 1939-1940 (3 folders) {series #25.68} include contracts for construction and erection of exhibit material by the Gardner Displays Company of Pittsburgh, New York, Detroit and Chicago together with extensive related correspondence. Also present is a proposal from Jenter Exhibits & Displays Company of Ridgefield, New Jersey. The Drawings, 1939-1940 (1 folder) {series #25.69} are Walter Gropius architectural blueprints for the Pennsylvania Exhibit, a blueprint of the reception rooms at the Pennsylvania Building, and a blueprint for the Lighting Layout Proposed for Addition, 1st Floor Pennsylvania Exhibit, New York World's Fair, 1940. The File on Gropius and Breuer, Architects, 1938-1939 (1 folder) {series #25.70} contains correspondence and telegrams of the Department of Property and Supplies and various construction engineers with the Massachusetts architectural firm of Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer together with occasional invoices, bills, and lists of amounts paid. Included are lists of bills for travel expenses sent by Gropius and Breuer providing date billed, service covered, amount billed and date payment received where applicable, and lists of amounts billed for blueprints and Photostats. Also present is a copy of the Agreement for Professional Services by Architect with Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer for the Construction of the Pennsylvania Exhibit at the New York World's Fair" (March 30, 1939). The Financial Statements, 1939-1940 (1 folder) {series #25.71} include correspondence, financial summaries, construction purchase requests, and financial statements of appropriations, allocations and obligations for the Pennsylvania exhibit at the New York World's Fair. Information provided varies with type of document but generally gives dates of appropriations, allocations, obligation or expenditure, amounts of each, description of purpose for which funds were allocated, and name of firms employed.

The General Contractors File, 1939-1941 (3 folders) {series #25.72} contains correspondence, telegrams, contracts, invoices and receipts relating to work carried out by the various contractors for the Pennsylvania exhibit at the 1939 New York World's Fair. The type of information provided is date of document, names and addresses of contractors, a description of the type of work for which contracted, and the amount for which contracted. The General Correspondence File, 1939-1941 (8 folders) {series #25.73 is concerned with contractors, exhibits, and the New York World's Fair 1939 Incorporated. Included are photographs and drawings of the exhibit area and financial breakdowns of expenditures. Correspondence maintained by Pennsylvania Exhibit Manager Josephine Foster Bright shed light on exhibits displayed at the fair while the correspondence of Chief Construction Engineer A. Judson Warlow tracks billing for various services and materials supplied by general contractors. Among Bright's correspondence is a copy of Rules and Regulations for Exhibitors and Concessionaires and Other Participants, Part VII, Special Rules and Regulations for Foreign Participants by New York World's Fair 1940 Incorporated (New York: 1940). The Minutes, [ca. 1938-1940] (1 folder) {series #25.74} of the meetings of the World's Fair Commission also include two copies of Senate Bill 32 as amended on third reading on February 9, 1939 that created the Commission.

Miscellaneous, 1939-1941, (8 folders) {series #25.75} items include correspondence, invoices, bills, receipts, lists, and notes relating to the Pennsylvania exhibit at the New York World's Fair. The Opinions, 1939 (1 folder) {series #25.76} are legal opinions rendered to Secretary of Property and Supplies Roger T. Rowland by Attorney General Claude T. Reno and Deputy Attorneys General Walter E. Glass and E. Russell Shockley concerning contracts entered into by the State World's Fair Commission, terms of office of members of the Commission and regarding procedures to be followed in conducting the Commission's business. The Property Release File, 1939-1941 (1 folder) {series #25.77} contains participant property release forms used for granting permission for removal of property from the Pennsylvania exhibit. Information provided is name of participant, gate number, date of removal, name of person or organization removing property, from where removed, description of the property removed, the truck or car license number, and the name of the driver. Also present is correspondence relating to the removal of property from the Pennsylvania exhibit that sometimes provides additional information about particular removals.

The Publicity File, 1939, (1 folder) {series #25.78} contains correspondence, invoices, and memoranda relating to charges incurred by the State World's Fair Commission to Walker & Downing of Pittsburgh for advertising. The type of information provided is date of invoice or correspondence, name of advertising firm, amount of charge incurred, and occasionally related information concerning such charges. The Purchased Materials File, 1939-1941, (1 folder) {series #25.79} contains correspondence and invoices relating to furniture, fire extinguishers, clothes lockers, shelving, garden tables and umbrellas, lawn furniture, Venetian blinds, and similar types of items purchased for the Pennsylvania exhibit at the New York World's Fair. Information provided is date of purchase, description of items purchased, the amount paid, and name and address of firm from which purchased. The Returned Materials File, 1940 (1 folder) {series #25.80} contains correspondence acknowledging return of items loaned for exhibit at the Pennsylvania exhibit at the New York World's Fair. Information provided is date of correspondence, name of correspondent, and brief description of the item or items loaned for exhibit. Also present is a list of fine art pieces lent providing name and address of lender, case number in which displayed and estimated valuation.

The Specification File, 1939 (1 folder) {series #25.81} contains specifications for the Pennsylvania exhibit prepared for Architects Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer. The specifications include proposal sheets, general conditions of the contract, addenda to the general conditions and the plan sheets, description of the work, and details concerning masonry, structural steel, light iron, carpentry, glazing, painting, and electrical wiring. The Unity Bridge File, 1939-1940 (1 folder) {series #25.82} contains correspondence maintained by Chief Construction Engineer A. Judson Warlow relating to maintenance and eventual disposition of the Unity Bridge that was provided by the County Commissioners of Allegheny County to the 1939 New York World's Fair. Information provided includes award of contract for construction of the suspension bridge, cost of construction, technical details concerning construction and surfacing of the bridge and the authorization for its eventual sale as scrap.

The Pennsylvania Three Hundredth Anniversary Commission was authorized by the General Assembly on July 2, 1937 and appointed by Governor George H. Earle to plan and carry out during 1938 an appropriate program to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the first Swedish settlement on the Delaware River cooperated with the United States Delaware Valley Tercentenary Commission, the national commissions of Finland and Sweden, the tercentenary commissions of Delaware, New Jersey and Maryland, the Pennsylvania Federation of Historical Societies, and other local committees and commissions. During the early months of 1938 the Commission conducted an extensive campaign educating school children in Pennsylvania on the significance of the 300th anniversary celebration that began with the proclamation of Forefather's Day on April 8, 1938. The climax of the tercentenary celebration occurred in June 1938 with the visit of the Crown Prince and Princess of Sweden to Philadelphia.

The Accounts, 1937-1939 (1 box) {series #25.83} contain bills, correspondence, and related budgetary records revealing expenditures for personnel, rent, office supplies, office equipment, postage and telegrams, Governor Printz Park, Public School Pageant publications, and the ceremonies for the visit of the Swedish Royal Family. The General Correspondence, 1936-1939 (4 boxes, 24 folders) {series #25.84} also contains two 33 1/3 records containing five-minute recordings of the tercentenary banquet held in Philadelphia in 1938. The Historical Data, [undated] (7 folders) {series #25.85} consists of research notes, biographical sketches, reports, articles, editorials, and bibliographies relating to the tercentenary of Swedish settlement in the Delaware River valley. Research notes consist primarily of typed transcripts of early historical documents. The biographical materials relate primarily to the Swedish ancestry of Governor Earle and of Frank Worthington Melvin, president of the Swedish Colonial Society of Philadelphia. The reports, articles and editorials consist of typed transcripts of pieces appearing in the Swedish and American press relating to the visit of Governor George H. Earle to Sweden from November 28, to December 7, 1937. In addition to the bibliographies relating to Swedish settlement on the Delaware are brochures entitled John Morton Memorial Museum issued by the American Swedish Historical Museum, Scandinavia Beckons by Amy Oakley, History of the Order of Amaranth, by Florence M. Beswick, and Delaware County Advocate (August, 1938).

The Legislation, 1935-1937 (1 folder) {series #25.86.} includes correspondence, memoranda, telegrams and transcripts of legislation. In general the memoranda contain arguments for joining Delaware and New Jersey in forming Commissions to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the first Swedish settlement on the Delaware. The transcripts are of House Bill 2240 of the 1935 session for creating a 300th Anniversary Commission and House Bill 1979 of the 1937 session authorizing the Pennsylvania Historical Commission to supervise suitable programs. The Minutes of the Meeting to Organize a General Tercentenary Committee, 1935 (1 volume) {series #25.87} concern the coordination of activities with the Delaware Tercentenary Commission and the American Tercentenary Commission. The Minutes of the Commission's Executive and Women's Executive Committees, 1938 (1 folder) {series #25.88} provide the names of members of the Women's Executive Committee, dates of meetings and of correspondence, names of members present for meetings or correspondent, and a description of the business transacted at meetings or subject of correspondence. Subject of correspondence generally involves appointments to the Women's Executive Committee. The Press Releases, 1937-1938 (1 folder) {series #25.89} provide a description of activities that were scheduled to occur.

The Publications, [ca. 1931-1938] (1 folder) {series #25.90} include the Pennsylvania 300th Anniversary Commission Program for ceremonies welcoming the official Swedish delegation on June28-29, 1938 and State Banquet Commemorating the Three Hundredth Anniversary of the Foundation of Pennsylvania Civilization held at the Benjamin Franklin Hotel on June 28, 1938. Articles include The Swedish Tercentenary Lectures by Neilson Abeel reprinted from The American-Scandinavian Review (Summer, 1938), "Preparations for the 'New Sweden' Tercentenary in 1938" by Naboth Hedin, "Pennsylvania Beginnings in the Colony of New Sweden" by C. Hale Sipe, and The Brief History of the Colonization of New Sweden Thereby Establishing the Foundation of Pennsylvania distributed by The Pennsylvania 300th Anniversary Commission. Also present are Federal Writers' Project brochures entitled The Swedes in New Jersey and The Swedes and Finns in New Jersey sponsored by the New Jersey Commission to Commemorate the 300th Anniversary of the Swedish Settlement on the Delaware. Other materials present include Proceedings of The Swedish Colonial Society at the Annual Meeting Held in the Assembly Rooms of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania, April 11, 1929, Together with the Constitution and By-Laws of the Society and a List of its Officers and Members (Philadelphia: 1931).

The Publicity Files, 1937-1939 (4 boxes, 3 folders) {series #25.91} contain historical sketches, press releases, brochures, news clippings, articles, pamphlets, photographs, and metal lithographic plates relating to the tercentenary of the first Swedish settlement along the Delaware River. Historical sketches include "Prologue to the Tercentenary" by Svenska Dagbladet (Stockholm: November 28, 1937). Among the news clippings is one entitled Magazine Says State Celebrated Five Years Too Soon explaining that, though Dutchman Peter Minuit settled a Swedish colony near Wilmington in 1638, it was not until 1643 that a Swedish colony was planted at Tinicum Island a few miles below the present site of Philadelphia upon land that eventually became Pennsylvania. Among the photographs are images of Governor Printz Park in Essington, the Printz burial place in Sweden, the reception by the Crown Prince of Sweden of the American delegation, and numerous portraits of American, Finnish and Swedish officials. The metal lithographic plates depict early American, Dutch, and Swedish historical figures. The Speeches, 1937-1938 (3 folders) {series #25.92} include "Extracts Submitted of Governor's Message" (January 4, 1937), "Address of Honorable George H. Earle, Governor of Pennsylvania, To Be Delivered From the S. S. Drottningholm, November 27th, One Day Prior to Landing in Gothenburg, Sweden" (undated), "Address of Governor of Pennsylvania Earle Hon. Geortge H. Earle, Gothenburg, Sweden" (November 28, 1937), "Address of Hon. George H. Earle, Governor of Pennsylvania, To the People of Sweden at the Presentation of the Two Memorial Plaques in Gothenburg" (November 29, 1937), "Address of Acceptance of Monument Presented by the People of the Republic of Finland" by United States Solicitor General Robert H. Jackson ((June 26, 1938), "Dedication of American-Swedish Historical Museum (June 28, 1938), "Dedication of Johan Printz Park at Philadelphia" (June 29, 1938), "Opening of Swedish Art Exhibition at Pennsylvania Museum of Art" (June 29, 1938), "Remarks of George H. Earle at Banquet of Pennsylvania 300th Anniversary Commission over World-Wide Network" (June 20, 1938), among others. Also present is a list the times of events on the Radio Time Schedule for Commonwealth Banquet Over Mutual Network at Benjamin Franklin Hotel (June 23, 1938).

The Commission for the 250th Anniversary of the First Landing of William Penn was originally authorized by a joint resolution of the General Assembly in 1929 and consisted of five persons appointed by Governor John S. Fisher charged with investigating the propriety of holding a celebration during 1932. In its report to newly elected Governor Gifford Pinchot in January, 1931, the Commission recommended that a marker be erected in Deal, England to mark the spot from which William Penn sailed in October 1682 and that a statue of William Penn also be erected in Fairmount Park in Philadelphia. The Commission further recommended that the City of Chester be recognized as William Penn's first landing place in Pennsylvania and that $250,000 be appropriated for the celebration. In 1932 the William Penn Commemoration Committee of the Pennsylvania Historical Commission was placed in charge of public observances commemorating William Penn's landing. A major observance was held in Convention Hall, West Philadelphia on October 24, 1932. On October 28, 1932 two bronze tablets commemorating William Penn were unveiled in Chester, Pennsylvania.
The General Correspondence, 1929-1933 (5 folders) {series #25.100} and the General File, 1932 (1 folder) {series #25.101} document the arrangements for the observances together with breakdowns of costs, lists of the names and addresses of persons on the program committee and subcommittees of the program committee, a distribution record of William Penn Day bulletins, and transcript of a message from the Governor. The Minutes, 1931 (1 folder) {series #25.102} of the Penn's Landing Commission chaired by Alba B. Johnson contain a tentative preliminary program prepared by Program Chairman Albert Cook Myers and the final program for the major observance held at Convention Hall in West Philadelphia on October 24, 1932. The Scrapbook, 1932 (1 folder) {series #25.103} contains newspaper clippings, brochures, booklets, a bibliography on William Penn and a postcard depicting Penn's Rocks, Withyham near Tunbridge Wells, England. The newspaper clippings include "The Rise and Decline of the Penns of Pennsylvania" a book review by R.L. Duffus (The New York Times Book Review, September 18, 1932) reviewing The Penns of Pennsylvania and England by Arthur Pound (New York: 1932). The booklets include William Penn as Seen in Excerpts From His Writings by Anna Lane Lingelbach (Philadelphia: 1932) and William Penn, Founder of Pennsylvania by Lucy B. Roberts (Philadelphia: 1919), both issued by The Religious Society of Friends. The remaining two items are Pennsylvania Historical Commission Bulletin No. 1 William Penn: A Bibliography, A Tentative List of Publications About Him and His Work by Mary Kirk Spence (Harrisburg: 1932) and Pennsylvania Historical Commission Bulletin No. 3 William Penn, A Radio Address Delivered on his Birthday, October 24, 1934 by Albert Cook Myers (Harrisburg: 1934).

The William Penn Tercentenary Committee was appointed by Governor Edward Martin on March 21, 1944 for the purpose of commemorating the 300th anniversary of William Penn's birth. In the proclamation, Governor Martin called "upon all of the citizens of this Commonwealth, and indeed upon all free men wherever they may be, to pause at some time during this year to study and contemplate the life and the principles of this truly great statesman who did so much to establish our heritage of Justice, Toleration and Freedom." Chaired by Charles F. Jenkins, the Committee opened an office on April 17, 1944 at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The Committee contacted educational institutions, publishers and newspapers asking for their cooperation in the tercentenary observance. It also encouraged individual schools, civic and fraternal groups throughout the Commonwealth to hold commemorative programs. As a result of the Committee's work, commemorations were also held in at least seventeen other states. The commemorative events culminated with an observance at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia on the evening of October 24 at which Governor Edward Martin presided. The final meeting was held on November 1, 1944 at which Secretary Stanley R. Yarnall read a draft report of the work of the committee and six resolutions were approved including the planting of hemlocks and masses of mountain laurel at appropriate locations across the Commonwealth.

The General Correspondence, 1944-1945 (6 folders) {series #25.105} and the General File, 1944 (1 folder) {series #25.106} provide information on the observances planned by fifteen county historical societies, a list of the names and addresses of each member of the William Penn Tercentenary Committee, a list of suggestions for observance to be held on William Penn Day, and a distribution list for the William Penn history book, and related records. The Remember William Penn History Book, 1945 (1 folder) {series #25.107} is a second edition of Remember William Penn, 1844-1944, A Tercentenary Memorial compiled by The William Penn Tercentenary Committee (Harrisburg: 1945). This illustrated volume contains reprints of William Penn's writings Some Fruits of Solitude and More Fruits of Solitude together with sketches of the man, his religious beliefs, role as a defender of freedom and builder of states, his relationship with the Indians, and the relevance of his life to the modern world. The Scrapbook, 1944 (6 folders) {series #25.108} contains newspaper clippings, articles and brochures relating to the life of William Penn and activities of the William Penn Tercentenary celebration. Among these is the October 1944 issue of The Junior Historian published by The Pennsylvania Federation of Junior Historians, the October 1944 issue of The Club Woman's Journal of Philadelphia, and the Tenth Month 21, 1944 issue of Friends Intelligencer all containing articles devoted to William Penn..

The Pennsylvania Post War Planning Commission was created by the General Assembly under an act approved by Governor Edward Martin on April 28, 1943 and was organized in June, 1944 with H. W. Prentiss, Jr. of Lancaster serving as chairman and Mark S. James of Pittsburgh as director. The other members were Charles L. Barber of Erie, Hannah M. Durham of Allentown, Dr. S. W. Fletcher of State College, Edward Hopkinson, Jr, of Philadelphia, Thomas Kennedy of Hazleton, Dr. Wier C. Ketler of Grove City, Richard K. Mellon of Ligonier and H. Melvin Vivien of Wilkes-Barre. These ten members represented the industrial, labor, agricultural, and civic interests of the Commonwealth and were charged with developing plans and recommending measures to offset the potential for the kind of post-war unemployment that had occurred after the First World War. The Commission established committees to examine problems arising in industry, employment, housing, conservation, agriculture, education, and fiscal and tax policy. The General Assembly abolished the Post-War Planning Commission in June 1947 by repealing the legislation by which it had been created.

The Committee Reports, [ca. 1943-1947] (1 box) {series #25.152} and the General Correspondence, [ca. 1943-1947] (8 boxes){series #25.153} contain correspondence, reports and brochures submitted to the Post-War Planning Commission by individual Committees. The committees included Conservation and Development, Agriculture, Conservation, Critical Resources, Education, Fiscal and Tax Policy, Highways and Bridges, Housing, Public Works, Recreation, Industrial Employment Stimulation, and Rivers and Harbors. The Interim Report, 1943-1946 (1 folder) {series #25.154} was issued by the Post-war Planning Commission covering such topics as means for stimulating industrial employment, housing considerations, highways and bridges, airports, natural resources, mineral resources, agriculture, stream pollution abatement, conservation, education, federal policy and taxation, state institutions, ports, and state grants to political subdivisions for planning post-war public works projects. Accompanying tables reveal for each county the1940 census total, maximum grant allotment, and the amount of grants approved and amount still available as of August 1, 1946 as well as breakdowns of the nature of the approved grants and estimated number of man-years of employment the projects would create.

The Minutes and Agenda, 1944-1946 (3 folders) {series #25.155} of the meetings of the Post War Planning Commission cover the activities of the Commission for the period from July 20, 1944 through October 22, 1946. The Notebook Material, [undated] (2 folders) {series #25.156} includes stray correspondence, press releases, penciled notes, monthly reports of appropriations or allocations, and materials for speeches to be delivered by Director Mark S. James among others. In addition, there are printed copies of veterans' legislation including Public Law 16 of the 78th Congress, Public Law 346 of the 78th Congress, Public Law 458 of the 78th Congress, Public Law 290 of the 78th Congress, Public Law 359 of the 78th Congress. Also present are copies of U. S. Senate Bills 953 (1943), 1163 (1943), 1243 (1943), and 1946 (1944) and U. S. House Bills 3200 (1943) and 3961 (1944) together with copies of Pennsylvania General Assembly Acts 11 of 1940, 50 and 51 of 1943, 73 of 1943, 182 of 1937, 211 of 1937, and 312 of 1943 together with analyses of the provisions of some of these acts. Among the analytical pieces is a typescript for an article entitled "U. S. May Regret Helping Russia to Become the World Power No. 1" by Karl H. Von Wiegand. The Recommendations to the Governor, 1945-1947 (5 folders) {series #25.157} include both specific recommendations submitted to the Governor and related correspondence sent by Chairman Prentiss from January 1945 through May 1947. Included is some budgetary information and a copy of House Bill 1084, "An Act to abolish the Post-War Planning Commission and to repeal the act by which it was created."

Record Group 26: Records of the Department of State

The: Records of the Department of State contain election returns, the laws and resolutions of the General Assembly, and the proclamations, veto messages and other recorded acts of the Governor. The Department is also responsible for issuing commissions to appropriate elected and appointed officials, receiving and examining documents relating to the incorporation and regulation of corporations, professional licensing, and regulation of charitable organizations. By their very nature, many of these types of records have been generated continuously so that anyone conducting research into the New Deal will need to consult those created during the relevant time frame.

Record Group 29: Records of theTurnpike Commission

The Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission was created in 1937 to construct, finance, operate and maintain a toll road which would connect the Harrisburg and Pittsburgh areas. The original section of the super-highway between Middlesex in Cumberland County and Irwin in Westmoreland County was completed in 1940. This route roughly followed the right-of-way of the South Pennsylvania Railroad, which had abandoned construction of its roadbed in 1885. The South Pennsylvania right-of-way was purchased by the Turnpike Commission which utilized some of the original grading and tunneling done by the railroad. Construction of the highway was made possible by a grant from the Public Works Administration and the initial purchase of turnpike bonds by the Reconstruction Finance Corporation.

The Historical File, 1935-1941 (1 folder) {series #29.1} includes a seventeen-page report on the history of the South Pennsylvania Railroad, detailing the routes, grades, and construction procedures; a copy of a speech presented to state representatives on January 13, 1939; a copy of Resolution No. 138 given in the State House of Representatives on April 23, 1935; an essay on modern excavation methods for the Pennsylvania Turnpike; general correspondence; information on South Pennsylvania Turnpike tunnels (Laurel Hill, Blue Mountain, Ray's Hill, Tuscarora, Kittatinny, Sideling Hill, and Allegheny Mountain) including length, water capacity, and grade percentage; a tabulation of distances between interchanges and tunnels, and a history of Fort Ligonier. The Land Acquisition Records, 1938-1941 (14 folders) {series #29.2} include agreements for land sales from private owners to the South Pennsylvania Railroad and Mining Company or between individuals. Each record provides the names of the grantor and grantee, deed date, acknowledgment date, acreage, monetary amount involved, deed book and volume number, and the signatures of the parties, witnesses, and recorder.

The Maps, 1937, 1941 (2 items) {series #29.3} depict lands in Butler's Valley Township in Somerset County and private properties, rail line routes, and coal regions in Lincoln, Jefferson, Somerset, Allegheny and Brother's Valley Township in Somerset County showing the original South Pennsylvania Railroad Company deed owners. The Right-of-Way Tracings, 1937 (4 items, 1 folder) {series #29.4} consist of fold-out plans showing the rights-of-way on the South Pennsylvania Railroad and detailing the angles and slopes. The Tunnel Profile Tracings, 1937 (7 items) {series #29.5} contain fold-out grid tracings for the tunnels of the South Pennsylvania Railroad (Allegheny Mountain Tunnel, Laurel Hill Tunnel, Ray's Hill Tunnel, Sideling Tunnel, Twin Tunnels, and Tuscarora Tunnel). These blueprints show slopes and angles, cubic footage of materials to be used, length and width of the tunnel, division number and name, chief engineer and division engineer's name, and location and route of the tunnel. The Consulting Engineers [materials], 1937-1989 (1 carton) {series #29.54} contain brochures and investigative reports relating to the research of prospective engineering companies and commissioned studies. Frequently, information appearing in the consulting engineers' overviews covers previous projects with photographs, staff, location information, creative aspects, and brief histories. The Indentures, 1937-1989 (1 carton) {series #29.55} are written contracts made to address the maintenance and preservation of the Pennsylvania Turnpike. Specific information provided are the enabling acts, administrative codes, indentures between the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission and the Fidelity-Philadelphia Trust Company, annual inspection reports, and a transportation study. Frequently, the information consists of pacts made between two organizations, or the state, in order to provide regulations and provisions for improvements to the turnpike.

Record Group 30: Records of thePennsylvania State Police

The Department of State Police was created in 1905 to help preserve law and order throughout the Commonwealth and to assist local law-enforcement officers in the apprehension of criminals. The original complement was limited by law to only 228 men to patrol the 45,000 square miles of Pennsylvania. The State Highway Patrol in the Department of Revenue, which had originally been established in the Department of Highways in 1923 to enforce motor vehicle laws, was merged with the Department in 1937 to become the Pennsylvania Motor Police. The name of the agency was changed to Pennsylvania State Police in 1943.
The Administrative File on Standard Operating Procedures, 1928-1988 (3 boxes) {series #30.3} ; the Annual and Biennial Reports, 1906-1966 (3 boxes) {series #30.4} and the Bulletins and Circular Letters, 1905-1943 (3 boxes) {series #30.5} provide good background to the activities of the State Police during the era of the New Deal. The Criminal Law Manual, 1939 (1 box) {series #30.7} provides a comprehensive listing of crime details with section, offense, and page notations, as wells as sections regarding the carrying out of summary convictions, habitual criminal acts, and an abstract on the Ludlow Act. Also present is a large question and answer section for trainees concerning criminal law and crimes. The General Correspondence, 1905-1946 (13 boxes) {series #30.10} is mostly from the Commissioner to and from the Art Commission, Colt's Patent Fire Arms Manufacturing Company, Department of Public Welfare, Eastern State Penitentiary, State Alcohol Permit Board, State Board of Medical Education, among others. The Historical File, 1905-1972 (4 boxes) {series #30.13} contains reports and correspondence on such topics as rules of criminal procedure, fingerprint cards, Highway Patrol rosters, honorable discharges, substation inspection reports, warrants, the 50th anniversary of the state police, and training calendars of the state police academy. Harrisburg. Summaries of motor vehicle violation arrests, 1937-1938, are organized by section violation and then by number of relevant arrests and convictions made.
The Lists of Requests for Assistance, 1915-1936 (1 box) {series #30.20} is a double entry record of amounts debited and credited to the various accounts of the Pennsylvania State Police. Entries from this journal are posted in the fiscal Division's Ledgers, 1905-1915, 1919-1945. Each dated entry provides the names of the accounts to be debited and credited; the related ledger page number; the purpose of the receipt or expenditure; and the amount. The Miscellaneous Reports and Printed Materials, 1905-1959 (2 boxes) {series #30.21} contains reports, transcripts, correspondence, and publications prepared by, or relating to activities of the Pennsylvania Sate Police.

The Newsletters and Bulletins, 1935-1939 (1 box) {series #30.24} contain an assortment of information on Troop A concerning troop personnel and activities, along with many cartoon-style illustrations done by officers. There is much information regarding the Stramare case involving the theft of more than seventy automobiles and other motor vehicles at which many Troop A officers gave testimony. The Bulletins of the Pennsylvania Motor Police contain notes from Governor Earle. Also included is a diploma blank for Basic Training at the Motor Police Training School for a Private, 2nd Class. The Photographs, [ca. 1930s] (2 boxes, 3 folders, 1 bundle) {series #30.25} depict subjects ranging from State Police Association pistol matches to the fingerprints of Victor Andreoli and Horace Bowers. A section includes photographs of Pennsylvania Police emblems and signs, along with a 'copy of a diagram of a drug abuser.' Also included is a series of 18 train and car wrecks from the 1930s. The Records of Special Duty and investigations, 1930-1950 (4 boxes) {series #30.28} contains correspondence and police reports on various special assignments such as the 1934 investigation into the operations of Eastern State Penitentiary pertaining to rioting; Report on the conditions at White Hill Industrial School, 1948; World's Fair correspondence and traffic files, 1938-1940; and Guard Duty performed at the York Commissary, 1933. The Records of Special Duty at the 75th Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, 1938 (1 box) {series #30.30} contain radiograms concerning guards for the governor's visit. Part of the special duty was organizing a guard detail for the visit of the President Franklin D. Roosevelt on 3 July 1938 during the lighting of the Eternal Flame Peace Memorial.

There are a number of records in Record Group 30 relating specifically to the activities of the Ku Klux Klan in Pennsylvania during this period. These include Ku Klux Klan General Accounts, 1925-1940 (2 boxes) {series #30.16} containing purchase reports for Klan supplies and bills, checks, and receipts for food and uniforms. Details of members' financial accounts also provided, as well as scratch paper used for accounting purposes. The Ku Klux Klan General Correspondence, 1922-1929, 1932, 1934-1940 (5 boxes) {series #30.17} documents Imperial Kligrapp appointments and applications for reinstatement of former Klansmen as well as those applying for admission. Numerous handwritten general interest letters from the public are included. Official decrees for those Klansmen who had become banished are given, as well as obituaries for prominent members of the KKK. A large portion of the correspondence concerns activities of Grand Dragon Samuel G. Stouch and the establishment of Klan contacts in other neighboring states. Kligrapp quarterly reports and requests for the establishment of Klan chapters are also given. The Ku Klux Klan General Files, 1923-1940 (3 boxes) {series #30.18} contain election returns, rosters, and applications detailing Klan operations. The rosters and election returns were sent to the Klan headquarters in Philadelphia identifying new Klan personnel and elected leaders. Each quarterly roster, 1933-1938, reveal the number of new members received, those suspended or deceased, the total number of members, a balance sheet if losss and gains, as well as province number, Klan number, and official Klan name and address. Election returns, or 'Report of Officers Elect' give names, numbers of members, location of Klan, date of klonklave and location of klavern. Among the various papers are counter signs giving code and password cyphers once a Klan met necessary requirements and all memberships were paid up. National and Imperial countersigns were given and consisted primarily of state names. All were signed by Stouch, the Imperial authority of the KKK in Delaware, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. There is a list of the names of the Women of Unity Klan #17, New Jersey. Official Bulletins, 1936-1937, contain information on provincial tax reports, Imperial Klonvocations, lunch committees, presidential elections, Halloween parties, and Ham and Egg suppers. Various publications are provided which belonged to Samuel Stouch, including Facts in Review, published by the German Library of Information in NYC, which listed daily news broadcasts from Berlin. A book written by fifty-four leading American writers, We Hold These Truths expresses anti-Semitism sentiments and contains lists of anti-Semitic publishers, organizations, and individuals in America. Quarterly reports gives the names of members in good standing, number of members naturalized, those reinstated and transferred, those deceased or banished, as well as those suspended for various reasons. The Ku Klux Klan Kleagle Robe Reports, 1924-1925 (3 boxes) {series #30.19} list kleagle ordered, address, date, location of Klan, quantity of Klansman's and Terror robes and helmets ordered, as well as those for the Exalted Cyclops robe and helmet sets. Name, number, and hat size for each Klansman is also given.

Record Group 31: Records of the Department of Commerce

The Department of Commerce was created in 1939 to promote the development of business, industry, and commerce in the State. Under the original commerce legislation, the Pennsylvania State Publicity Commission was abolished and its function of attracting tourists to the Commonwealth was transferred to the Department as the Bureau of Travel Development and Business Services. The relevant records in this record group relating to the New Deal era are almost exclusively photographic in nature. These include the Photograph File of Mounted Prints and Negatives, 1938-1954 (9 boxes, 12 cartons) {series #31.6} and the Photograph File of Transparencies, 1938-1954 (9 boxes) {series #31.7} . Items of a somewhat more unique nature are the Aerial Photographs and Index of the 1940 Aerial Survey of Pennsylvania, 1937-1942 (32 drawers, 26 cartons) {series #3.18} . (Scanned images of these photographs can be viewed by following the [Images] link to the PennPilot website.) The Project Application File of the Post-War Planning Commission, 1945-1951(1 carton) {series #31.20} contains contracts written for state grants to aid in the construction of public works in the post World War II years. Each contract gives the date and name of the party applying for the grant, the amount of money involved, the type of project, the file number, agreement details, and the signatures of the witnesses and other individuals involved in the contract. Other material that can be found in each applicant's package include financial data, voucher forms, general contracts, and in some cases blueprints or sketches of the project.

Record Group 32: Records of the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board

The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board was created in November, 1933 in anticipation of the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The Board was directed to set up and operate a system of state-operated stores to be the only outlets for the sale of wine and spirits in their original packages. It was also given authority to license hotels, restaurants and clubs for the sale of wine and liquor by the drink. The Administrative Correspondence Relating to Board Policy and Decisions, 1937-1940 (8 boxes) {series #32.1} contain meeting minutes and related documents such as memoranda regarding personnel actions, leases, contract awards, purchase requests, correspondence from manufacturers requesting to sell a particular brand in Pennsylvania, and standard quotation forms listing the name, type of product, manufacturer, alcoholic content and cost. The Purchase Orders, 1933-1934 (6 folders) {series #32.5} and related correspondence cover the period of the first few months following the repeal of Prohibition in Pennsylvania on December 5, 1933. Information contained on the orders includes the name and address of the vendor, brand and description of item, quantity ordered, and cost per case. The Record Books of Income and Expenditures, 1934-1947 (3 volumes) {series #32.6} contain ledger books from the Liquor Control Board's Bureau of Accounting. Information recorded includes the date and type of transaction, cash balance, income from licensing and the sale of liquor, including sales tax, and the loss and damage refunds of recovered expenditures.

Record Group 33: Records of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania

As with the: Records of the Department of State in Record Group 26, these records were kept continuously through the era of the New Deal and the relevant series may be searched for court cases that came before the court in the Eastern District, Middle District or Western District during the period.

Record Group 35: Records of the Milk Marketing Board

The Pennsylvania Milk Control Commission was created in 1937 to replace a Milk Control Board established under a temporary control law passed in 1934. The Milk Control Law of 1937 gave the Commission broad powers to regulate and supervise the entire milk industry in the Commonwealth. A 1968 amendment changed the name of the Commission to that of the Milk Marketing Board, and in 1980, the scope of the Board's powers was broadened by the Milk Producers' Security Fund Act. The Board is responsible for supervising and regulating the entire milk industry in the Commonwealth, including the production, processing, storage, disposal, transportation, distribution, and sale of milk and milk products in order to protect the health and welfare of the residents. The Board provides security for the farmers by licensing milk dealers and bonding those dealers for milk purchased from Pennsylvania farmers. The Findings of Fact Files, 1937-1941, 1946-1966 (6 cartons) {series #35.7} contain general orders for the regulation of milk prices in specific areas that were defined by the Milk Marketing Board. For each general order, this series contains a copy of the order accompanied by pertinent findings of fact records. The findings of fact files include testimony presented at hearings regarding these orders and whether they should be revised or whether the current order should stand. The Public Hearing Transcripts, 1942-1969 (29 cartons) {series #35.9} contain transcripts of various public hearings regarding price control and general orders. Other issues include illegal activities in the milk industry, fixing maximum prices charged to consumers and handlers, and adjusting minimum prices in times of emergency. The Licensing and Bonding Division Records, 1934-1962 (720 negative microfilm rolls) {series #35.11} contain milk dealer license applications, milk dealer monthly reports, audit reports, hearing transcripts and exhibits, case records, financial statements and audit reports.

Record Group 37: Records of the Public Utility Commission

The Public Utility Commission was created in 1937 to regulate the intrastate rates and services of public utilities. The Commission replaced the Public Service Commission, which had been charged with that responsibility since its establishment in 1913. Created in 1907 and given powers only in regard to common carriers, the Pennsylvania State Railroad Commission had been the Commonwealth's first public utility regulatory agency. The State Railroad Commission was abolished when the Public Service Commission was given the authority to regulate all public-service companies except those engaged in interstate commerce. The jurisdiction of the Public Utility Commission extends to gas and oil pipeline transmission, common carriers of passengers or property (train, bus, truck, taxicab, aircraft and ferry), and gas, water, telephone, telegraph, electric, steam and sewerage companies. Utility services provided by municipalities beyond their corporate limits are also subject to Commission regulation.

The Minute Books of the Public Service Commission and the Public Utility Commission, 1919-1968 (224 volumes) {series #37.2} document the proceedings of the Public Service Commission from October 20, 1919 to March 30, 1937 and the Public Utility Commission from April 6, 1937 to November 7, 1968. These Commissions had the power to regulate all public service companies conducting business in Pennsylvania. Matters discussed during the meetings concern complaints and applications pertaining to rate schedules, fare increases, operators as carriers for persons or property, the operation of transportation services in or between specified areas, utilities in specified areas, facility improvements, the failure to pay fines or damages, the failure to attain property and injury insurance. The Annual Reports of Non-Transportation Utilities, 1914, 1922-1995 (107 cartons) {series #37.4} contain financial and statistical statements of such non-transportation companies as telegraph, telephone, water, gas, electric, and combination utilities, filed annually with the Rates and Research Bureau of the Public Utilities Commission. The Annual Reports of Transportation Utilities for Large and Small Carriers, 1939-1969, 1972-1993 (291 cartons, 14 boxes) {series #37.5} contain financial and statistical statements of transportation companies such as trucking, railroads, buses, and taxicabs, filed annually with the Bureau of Transportation in the Public Utility Commission. Information furnished varies by type of carrier but generally includes each company's name and location, reporting period, type of carrier, names of officers and directors, corporate structure, financial statements, and statistical tables which describe the physical system and services provided by the carrier.


Record Group 38: Records of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania

As with the: Records of the Department of State in Record Group 26 and the: Records of theSupreme Court of Pennsylvania in Record Group 33, these records were kept continuously through the era of the New Deal and the relevant series may be searched for cases that came before the court in the Eastern District, Middle District, Scranton District or Western District during the period.

Record Group 39: Records of the Game Commission

The Game Commission is responsible for enforcing the Commonwealth's game laws relating to the management, protection and preservation of game, birds and fur-bearing animals. The Commission regulates the hunting and trapping of game, sets bag limits, operates game farms and employs game protectors. Created in 1895 as the Board of Game Commissioners, it was renamed the Pennsylvania Game Commission in 1937. The History File from the Game Commission Library, 1895-1999 (9 cartons, 5 boxes) {series #39.2} was transferred to the Game Commission Library and stored there until the library was dismantled in 1999. The records include copies of Game Laws by animal and by year enacted; complaints filed against the Commission; surveys of taxidermists and paid field officers concerning various animals, such as goshawks, snowy owls and squirrels; financial reports about game refuges and game lands; reports on different types of animals; volumes from Secretary Kalbfus concerning sportsmen associations and game laws; and blueprints of buildings to be built on game lands and farms. The Minute Books, 1897-1958, 1972-1976 (9 volumes, 1 microfilm roll) {series #39.1} document the meetings held by the Pennsylvania Game Commission in compliance with legislation establishing the Commission and directing that it meet at least twice annually in Harrisburg. Business considered includes applications for licenses, revocations, petitions and complaints, land sales, personnel actions, and similar matters relating to the management of state game and refuge lands.

Record Group 41: Records of the Navigation Commission for the Delaware River and its Navigable Tributaries

The regulation of shipping on the Delaware River can be traced back to the passage of an act by the Provincial Assembly in 1766 which provided for the appointment of Wardens for the Port of Philadelphia. The Wardens were responsible for issuing pilots licenses and making rules and regulations governing their service. Legislation passed in 1803 provided for a Board of Wardens consisting of a Master Warden and six assistants. This act defined the powers of the Board to grant licenses to pilots, to make rules for their conduct, to decide disputes involving masters of vessels and ship owners, to direct the mooring of vessels and their loading and unloading, and to publish rules and regulations relating to these duties. The Board of Commissioners of Navigation for the River Delaware was created in 1907 to assume those duties previously assigned to the Wardens for the Port, and the offices of the Harbor Master and Master Warden.

In 1937 the Commissioners of Navigation were replaced by the Navigation Commission for the Delaware River and Its Navigable Tributaries. Aside from some minute books, registers of arrivals and departures, and period photographs, there is relatively little that relates directly to the era of the New Deal. Also present, however, are several series relating to the Pennsylvania Maritime Academy that was first established under the Act passed by the United States Congress on June 20, 1879, whereby any state of the union desiring and capable of supporting a nautical school ship for the purpose of training officers for the merchant marine service was to be assigned a suitable vessel by the United States Navy. On April 17, 1889 the Pennsylvania General Assembly created a Board of Directors consisting of three members appointed by the Governor and three members appointed by the Mayor of Philadelphia to manage the Pennsylvania Nautical School at Philadelphia. In the same year, the United States Navy assigned the U.S.S. Saratoga, together with officers and a skeleton crew, to Pennsylvania for use as a nautical school ship. After eighteen years in service to the state, this sailing ship was replaced by the steamship U.S.S. Adams in 1907. When Phildelphia failed to appropriate sufficient funds for the maintenance of the steamship, the Commonwealth also refused to grant funds. As a result, in 1913 the U.S.S. Adams was withdrawn by the Navy and the school was closed.

When reestablished by the General Assembly in 1919, the Pennsylvania State Nautical School was placed under the control of the Board of Commissioners of Navigation. In 1920, the Navy Department assigned the U.S.S. Annapolis to the school and in 1923 the expenditure of state funds for the school became subject to the approval of the Superintendent of the Department of Public Instruction. In 1937, the management of the school and the school ship was placed under the newly established Navigation Commission for the Delaware River and its Navigable Tributaries. The Chairman of the Commission was the Secretary of the Department of Forests and Waters. In 1940 the United States Congress transferred all nautical school ships from the cognizance of the Navy Department to that of the United States Maritime Commission. The Pennsylvania Nautical School was at that time renamed the Pennsylvania Maritime Academy. In May 1941 the U.S.S. Annapolis was replaced by the former United States Coast Guard Cutter Seneca, which was renamed the Keystone State.

The relevant records include the Accounts, 1919-1933, 1940-1959 (2 volumes, 1 box) {series #41.48} that include cash books for the school ship U.S.S. Annapolis (1919-1933) and the cadet equipment funds (1944) and the account records for cadets (1940-1959) including per diem payrolls for the period 1945-1948. Account records and cash books give the name of cadet, date of cadet's entry into service, description of the items purchased, amount of debit for each purchase, and a running tally of the amount deposited and the account balance. The per diem payrolls give date span covered by payroll, name of employee, employee title, address, dates and number of hours worked each day, rate per hour, and amount paid. A medical expenses file contains correspondence and financial records for expenses incurred by cadets for various injuries and diseases. Information generally provided is name of cadet, date of injury or disease, description of injury or disease, amounts of expenses incurred, and change of pay status. The Admission Book, 1896-1947 (1 volume) {series #41.49} provide admission number, name of student admitted to the school, date admitted, age, height, weight, chest size, whether vaccinated, place of birth, name and address of parent or guardian, and remarks that usually give the date of graduation. The Logs, 1942-1943, 1946 (10 volumes, 1 folder) {series #41.50} are hourly log books and quartermasters' bridge books for the training vessel U.S.S. Keystone State. Information provided is day of the week and date, hourly direction and force of wind, barometric pressure, air and water temperature, periodic descriptions of weather conditions, signature of the person making the observations and the signature of the navigator and of the commanding officer of the vessel. Also occasionally given are the quantities of fuel and water supply expended and on hand.

The Minutes of the Board of Instruction of the State Nautical School Annapolis (State Nautical School), 1927-1947 (1 volume, 1 folder) {series #41.51} of the State Nautical School Ship U.S.S. Annapolis (September 23, 1927-October 8, 1941) and of the Board meeting concerning the training ship Keystone State held on February 14, 1947. Information provided is date of meeting, names of those present, and description of the business transacted. The Personnel File, 1944-1947 (32 folders) {series #41.52} contains correspondence, United States Maritime Service Enrollment forms, Change of Pay Status forms, Special Liberty forms, Cadet Registration Cards, Cadet's Personal Property forms, and Applications for Appointment as Midshipman, Merchant Marine Reserve and United States Naval Reserve that were addressed to the Superintendent or District Merchant Marine Cadet Instructor at the Pennsylvania Maritime Academy. Information provided on the latter forms includes the name of applicant, date and place of birth, educational background, record of previous military service, name and address of next of kin, and a photograph of the applicant. The Maritime Service Enrollment forms generally provide, in addition to the above information, the applicant's citizenship status, race, and marital status. Other documents reveal such types of information as pay rates, a description and valuation of a cadet's personal property, and the dates and duration of any leave granted. (Access to personnel records is restricted) .

The Photographs and Blueprints, 1916-1941, 1946-1947 (7 folders) {series #41.53} depict the school ships Annapolis and Seneca and blueprints are for the proposed academy at Morrisville (1946-1947). The Reports and General Correspondence, 1941-1947, 1950 (38 folders) {series #41.54} include materials on the Special Commission Investigating the Pennsylvania Maritime Academy, also known as the Gordon Case (1944), and of the investigation of the collision of the S.S. Fotini with the ferry boat Lackawanna (1950) and related correspondence. Subjects of the correspondence include arguments concerning the closing of the Academy, material and equipment for the Academy at Morrisville, employment records, inventories, medical reports, and the training vessel U.S.S. Keystone State including repairs and alterations, cruises, dry dock records, plan of the day, circulars, and redelivery of the vessel to the War Shipping Administration at James River Reserve Fleet in 1946. ( Access to General Correspondence is Restricted ). The Yearbooks, 1924, 1926-1935, 1937-1941, 1944-1946 (19 volumes) {series #41.55} are published graduation yearbooks entitled The Helm. Information provided is names and photographs of all officers and the Navigation Commissioners and the name, a photographic portrait, rank, and a biographical sketch of each graduate. Also present are articles and photographs concerning various Academy activities.

Record Group 42: Records of the Department of Revenue

The Corporate Ledgers, 1855-1951 (339 volumes) {series #42.2} contain debit and credit accounts of taxes assessed and paid by corporations doing business in Pennsylvania. The Out of Existence (OE) Registry File, 1881-1977 (188 cartons) {series #42.3} is a registry of companies transacting business in Pennsylvania which went out of existence and usually provides three types of documents for each case: a Domestic or Foreign Registry Statement, a Change Notice, and an Out of Existence Affidavit. Typical information appearing in the file includes the name of the institution or company; the date of incorporation or organization; the Act of Assembly or authority under which it was formed, incorporated or organized; the place of business; the post office address; the names of the president, chairman, secretary, treasurer, or cashier; the amount of capital authorized by its charter and the amount of capital paid into the treasury; the change in business status contemplated; and the effective date of the change. The Out of Existence (OE) Registry File Index, 1881-1977 (14 volumes) {series #42.4} consists of computer generated listings of the businesses that appear in the Out of Existence (OE) Registry File, 1881-1977 {series #42.3} . The Record of Collateral Inheritance Tax Appraisements and Receipts, 1898-1950 (8 volumes) {series #42.5} contains a record of the appraisements of estates subject to collateral inheritance tax. Information provided includes name and county of decedent; appraised values of real and other property; tax rate; amount of tax due per appraisement; dates of appraisers' return and register's receipt; date charged, sealed and countersigned at the Auditor General's office; total value of appraisements filed; debts and expenses of administration; whether a five percent discount for prompt payment was granted; penalty or interest due; amount of tax paid to register; date and amount of payment into the State Treasury; a stamp and statement verifying the closure of the account; the name of the Register of Wills handling the account; and miscellaneous notes and remarks.

The Record of Direct Inheritance Tax Appraisements and Receipts, 1917-1950 (bulk 1917-1929) (19 volumes) {series #42.6} is a record of the appraisements of estates subject to direct inheritance tax. Information provided includes name, date of death and county of decedent; appraised values of real and other property; tax rate; amount of tax due per appraisement; dates of appraisers' return and register's receipt; date charged, sealed and countersigned at the Auditor General's office; total value of appraisements filed; debts and expenses of administration; whether a five percent discount for prompt payment was granted; penalty or interest due; amount of tax paid to register; date and amount of payment in the State Treasury; a stamp and statement verifying the closure of the account; the name of the Register of Wills handling the account; and miscellaneous notes and remarks. Most of the volumes date from 1917 to 1929. However, one volume for Allegheny, Berks, Bucks, Delaware, Montgomery and York counties contains entries dated from 1936-1939, while another volume, containing entries for all counties, dates from 1917-1950. The Record of Transfer Inheritance Tax Appraisements and Receipts, 1917-1965 (97 volumes) {series #42.7} records the appraisements of estates subject to transfer inheritance tax (a tax on the transfer of property taking place between the decedent and the heirs). Information provided includes name, date of death and county of decedent; appraised values of real and other property; tax rate; amount of tax due per appraisement; dates of appraisers' return and register's receipt; date charged, sealed and countersigned at the Auditor General's office; total value of appraisements filed; debts and expenses of administration; whether a five percent discount for prompt payment was granted; penalty or interest due; amount of tax paid to register; date and amount of payment in the State Treasury; a stamp and statement verifying the closure of the account; the name of the Register of Wills handling the account; and miscellaneous notes and remarks.

Record Group 43: Records of the Department of Environmental Resources

The Photographs of State Parks and Natural Areas, [ca. 1935-1950] (1 box) {series #43.52} consist of photographs and postcards pertaining to natural areas and State Parks in Pennsylvania. Parks and other scenic area including Chapman State Park, Cowan's Gap, Goldsboro State Park, Keystone State Park, Old Ferry Tavern in New Hope, Raccoon Creek State Park and Ole Bull State Park.

Record Group 45: Records of the Department of Mines and Mineral Industries

The Department of Mines was created in 1903 to succeed the Bureau of Mines, which had been established in the Department of Internal Affairs in 1897. The name of the Department was changed in 1956 to Mines and Mineral Industries. In keeping with its primary responsibility of protecting coal miners from unsafe working conditions, the Department enforced the anthracite and bituminous coal mining laws of the Commonwealth, inspected mines and collieries, investigated serious accidents, and supervised the examination and certification of applicants for certain mining jobs. The Department also supervised the restoration of strip-mine areas, promoted research relating to new uses and markets for coal, and published the annual reports of the coal mine inspectors.
Among the records covering the era of the New Deal are the Bituminous Mine Certification Records for Assistant First and Second Grade Foremen, 1923-1963 (5 volumes) {series #45.4} ; the Bituminous Mine Certification Records for Electricians, 1939-1963 (2 volumes) {series #45.5} ; the Bituminous Mine Certification Records for Fire Boss Examiners, 1912-1963 (12 volumes) {series #45.6} ; the Bituminous Mine Certification Records for First Grade Foremen, 1903-1963 (10 volumes){series #45.7} ; and the Bituminous Mine Certification Records for Second Grade Foremen, 1903-1963 (9 volumes) {series #45.8} . Also Present is the Correspondence of Anthracite Division Mine Inspectors, 1903-1951 (4 cartons) {series #45.10} and the Correspondence of Bituminous Division Mine Inspectors, 1903-1930, 1936, 1949 (7 cartons) {series #45.11} to and from the Chief of the Department of Mines in Harrisburg, division inspectors, the Director of the Department of Interior, the Bureau of Mines and owners or operators of mines in each inspector's district concerns use of open lamps, mine explosions, mine fires, safety issues.

The General Correspondence, 1903-1965 (25 cartons){series #45.12} includes reports, memoranda, speeches, office memoranda, articles and budgets from the Office of the Secretary of the Department of Mines and Mineral Industries. Subjects discussed include appropriations, automobile equipment, accidents, the Anthracite Institute, child labor laws, the Coal Advisory Board, bituminous mine inspectors, the Economy and Efficiency Committee, various Pennsylvania governmental departments, dewatering mines, electrical inspectors, explosives, the Holmes Safety Association, mine fires, mine gas, mining schools, mine refuse pile fires, the Republican State Committee, the Pennsylvania State Police, the Sanitary Water Board, strike reports, strip mine inspectors, welfare conditions and living conditions, union and non-union mines, the Works Progress Administration (WPA), and tests of miners' lamp oil at the University of Pittsburgh. The Mine Disaster File, 1939-1964 (3 cartons) {series #45.13} contains correspondence, memoranda, reports, transcriptions and agendas filed by the Commission of Mine Inspectors concerning mine disasters. Reports by the Commission describe the mine, type of disaster, the extent of the damage, a description of rescue and recovery operations, investigations, conclusions and recommendations. The Registers of Mine Accidents for Anthracite Districts, 1899-1972 (19 volumes) {series #45.14} and the Registers of Mine Accidents for the Bituminous Districts, 1899-1972 (20 volumes) {series #45.15} provide such information as the name of the inspector, name of mine, name of the injured miner, mine district number, date of the accident, cause of accident, whether fatal, whether the accident occurred inside or outside the mine, citizenship status, nationality, job classification, marital status, and the number of children.

Record Group 52: Records of the Department of Transportation

The Pennsylvania Aeronautics Commission that was created in 1943 to promote and regulate aeronautics in the Commonwealth was abolished in 1970 and its powers and duties were transferred to the Department of Transportation. The Minutes of the Pennsylvania Aeronautics Commission, l943-1970 (2 cartons) {series #52.3} provides information on the progress on federal and state aid for the Airport Construction Program, enforcement and accident investigation statistics, lists of requests and resolutions for the approval of airport sites, lists of requests and approval resolutions for state money to match the federal aid airport program, and financial statements of the appropriations and expenditures of the commission.

The Pennsylvania Aeronautics Commission Reports, l943-1959 (1 box) {series #52.4} are primarily annual and biennial reports of the Pennsylvania Aeronautics Commission together with annual reports of the enforcement and accident division, a report on the accomplishments of the Pennsylvania Aeronautics Commission, 1943-1951, a report on the accomplishments of the Aeronautics Commission during Governor Duff's Administration; a 1949 statistical report; and a publication titled A Great Step Forward in Civil Aviation, published in 1955, 1956, and 1959, which provide a history of the commission from 1943 until the date of publication. The reports generally provide such information as the names of commission officials, the organization and powers of the commission, and narrative and statistical information relating to airport construction, airport licensing and inspection, airport safety improvement, enforcement and accident investigation, air navigational aids, civil defense, public relations, aviation education, the air search and rescue program, state owned aircraft, and the Harrisburg State Airport. The Pennsylvania Aeronautics Commission Subject Files, l941, 1943-1961 (1 box and 1 carton) {series #52.5} consists primarily of correspondence and reports relating to the activities of the commission, but also includes a commission administrative history, an air search and rescue procedure manual, committee reports and transcripts of the airport use panel, maps, newspaper clippings, a photograph, press releases, and publications. Topics highlighted include the Abolishment of State Aeronautics Commissions, Air Transport Requirements of Pennsylvania, Airport construction allocations, the Airport Safety Improvement Program, cases before the Civil Aeronautics Board, the Federal Aid Airport Program, history of the Aeronautics Commission, and individual Airports such as Centerville, Coatesville, Delaware County, Middletown, North Philadelphia, Philipsburg, Pottstown, State College, and Wings.

MANUSCRIPT GROUPS

Manuscript Group 9: Pennsylvania Writers Collection, 1899-1970 (4 cubic feet)


Materials written or published during the era of the New Deal include manuscripts and lyrics authored by Lois Miller, Christopher Morley, Mark Sullivan, Nelia Gardner White, Will George Butler, Charles Wakefield Cadman, Elizabeth Fay, and Amelia Reynolds Long.

Manuscript Group: 11 Map Collection, 1681-1973 (48 cubic feet)

A number of forest maps and tourist maps in this collection were created during the era of the New Deal as well as some aeronautical, highway, county, and topographical maps.

Manuscript Group 85: J. Horace McFarland Papers, 1859-1866, 1898-1951 (20 cubic feet)

J. Horace McFarland (1859-1948) was born in McAlisterville, Juniata County, on Sept. 29, 1859 but resided in Harrisburg for most of his life. During the opening decades of the Twentieth Century he emerged as an articulate advocate of the "City Beautiful" movement that resulted in such progressive improvements as paved streets in Harrisburg, the City Island water filtration plant, Riverfront Park, Wildwood Lake and associated flood control projects. A noted early conservationist, McFarland also campaigned vigorously for the preservation of Niagara Falls, the development of national parks, roadside beautification and against the blight of billboards. Together with Mira Lloyd Dock, McFarland was a seminal figure in the growth the national "City Beautiful" movement. As a founder of the American Civic Association, he took the "Harrisburg Plan" on the road to cities all across the United States. Among the records that continue through the era of the new Deal are those relating to McFarland's leadership in the American Civic Association (1901-1950), the National Conference on City Planning (1920-1946), and the American Planning and Civic Association, 1920-1951.

Manuscript Group: 160 Arthur H. James Papers, 1937-1943 (36 cubic feet)

A native of Plymouth in Luzerne County, Arthur H. James (b. 1883, d. 1974) graduated from Dickinson School of Law in 1904 and was elected as a district attorney of Luzerne County on the Republican ticket in 1919, as Lieutenant Governor of Pennsylvania in 1926, and Judge of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania in 1932. He subsequently served as Governor of Pennsylvania from January 1939 to January 1943. These papers were originally kept by Gubernatorial Secretary J. Paul Pedigo and Assistant Secretary LeRoy V. Greene. They contain materials relating to the anthracite coal industry, the State Athletic Commission, the Department of Banking, proposed flood control projects, departmental and legislative investigations, the Interstate Commission on the Delaware River Basin, the Department of Highways, state hospitals, labor relations, regulation of milk in Pennsylvania, penal institutions, the Department of Public Instruction, the Public Utility Commission, relief and welfare, the Shenandoah Mine Cave-In, the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, and the Works Progress Administration.

Manuscript Group: 184 Reading Labor Advocate Records, 1917-1958 (1.5 cubic feet)

The Reading Labor Advocate was the official organ of the Socialist Party of Berks County and of the Federated Trades Council of Reading. Among the items present are minutes of the Executive Committee of the Socialist Party of Pennsylvania from 1932 to 1934 and 1936 to 1937, reports of the Socialist Party of Pennsylvania for 1932 featuring a report of the executive secretary and a report on organizational work in the anthracite region, correspondence from the period 1919 to 1946 representing such figures as George W. Hartman, Daniel W. Hoan, Jesse Holmes, Sarah Limbach, Jasper McLevy, James Oneal, Clarence Senior, and Norman Thomas, legal papers for the period 1917 to 1938, and undated photographs and accounts from 1918 to 1958.

Manuscript Group: 186 Francis A. Pitkin Papers, 1933-1966 (1.5 cubic feet)

Minutes, reports, correspondence, addresses, and newspaper clippings pertaining to the state planning career of Francis A. Pitkin (b. 1899, d. 1969), executive director of the State Planning Board from 1936 to 1964, except for the period 1955-59, when he served as director of the Bureau of Community Development in the Department of Commerce. Included is an 18-page manuscript entitled "A History of the South Pennsylvania Railroad," dated 1935, author unknown.

Manuscript Group 200: Poster Collection, 1854-1972 and undated (36 cubic feet)

Most of the posters concern wars and political campaigns.

Manuscript Group 213: Postcard Collection [ca. 1880-1974] (10 cubic feet)

A significant number of these postcards were created during the era of the New Deal.

Manuscript Group 214: Warren J. Harder Collection, 1928-1968 (10 cubic feet)

Approximately 7 cubic feet consists of photographic prints and negatives, ca. 1941-63, depicting Harrisburg personalities, community activities, bridges and streams, industrial and commercial facilities, parks and cemeteries, public and private buildings, and railroads. Also present are photographic copies of portraits of U. S. presidents and governors of Pennsylvania.

Manuscript Group 215: Ethnic Studies Collection, 1789-1975 (50 cubic feet)

A collection of ethnic newspapers, photographs of immigrant workers, and church anniversary histories pertaining to such Pennsylvania ethnic groups as African-Americans, Germans, Hungarians, Italians, Lithuanians, Polish, Slovene-Windish and Welsh.

Manuscript Group 218: Photograph Collections [ca. 1853-ongoing] (20 cubic feet)

A significant number of photographs in this collection were created during the era of the New Deal.

Manuscript Group 254: Audio-Visual Collection [ca. 1920-ongoing]

The New Deal era is represented by films taken by Sherm Lutz as a trainer for the Civilian Pilot Training Program at Boalsburg Air Field, ca. 1935-1941. Scenes show trainees checking planes, practicing take-offs and landings, etc. Also included are scenes at the State College Air Depot, ca. 1945-1955, most notably showing the landing at that airport of the first DC-3. There are a total of seven 16mm silent color reels running 1,800 ft. Also present is the Jerry Brinser Collection, 4 reels, ca. 1920-ca. 1936, pertaining to Harrisburg and Harrisburg area activities and events

Manuscript Group 281: Samuel W. Kuhnert Papers, [1897-1976] (30 cubic feet)

Samuel W. Kuhnert (b. 1890 - d. 1978) was born in Steelton and grew up on a farm near Halifax. He operated a photography processing business from his home in Camp Hill, and later on North Third Street in Harrisburg. Having a special interest in aviation, in 1919 he became interested in aerial photography and began building a small airplane powered by a motocycle engine. Unable to get this machine to fly, he took his first aerial photographs of Harrisburg on June 7, 1920 from a Curtiss "Jenny" biplane. In 1921 he bought some government surplus aviation equipment including a two-cylinder 30hp Lawrence engine and finally succeeded in building a wire-braced monoplane, his third effort, that finally flew. During the succeeding two decades he made and sold oblique aerial views of towns and landscapes in central Pennsylvania and his brother, Walter Kuhnert, distinguished himself as a balloonist. Samuel Kuhnert's last flight at the age of 86 is well documented by photographs in this collection. Following his death, Samuel Kuhnert's children donated his photographs to the State Archives and gave his flight suit and aerial cameras to the State Museum of Pennsylvania.

The collection consists of over 6,000 photographic prints and negatives, motion picture films, miscellaneous business and personal records, and newspaper clippings. Special subjects include the 1936 flood in the Harrisburg region, a 1932 snowstorm in Camp Hill, the destruction of the Last Raft at Muncy, various airplane crashes, automobile accidents, natural disasters, autopsies, and funerals. There are also a large number of professional and family portraits and depictions of local buildings and structures. Communities for which aerial views will be found include Amity Hall, Andersonburg, Bloomsburg, Boiling Springs, Brookville, Camp Hill, Carlisle, Chambersburg, Clarks Valley, Dauphin, Duncannon, Elizabethtown, Emmitsburg, Enola, Gettysburg, Good Hope, Hagerstown, Halifax, Hanover, Harrisburg, Hershey, Hummesltown, Fort Indiantown Gap, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lemoyne, Lewisburg Federal Prison, Lewistown Mountains, Liverpool, Marysville, Mechanicsburg, Middletown, Milroy, Milton, Mount Gretna, Mount Pleasant, Mount Zion, New Berlin, New Bloomfield, New Cumberland, Perdix, Rockville, Powell's Valley, Safe Harbor, Selinsgrove, Shippensburg, Shiremanstown, State College, Summerdale, Sunbury, Wellsville, Wertzville, Williamsport, and York.

Among the aircraft depicted are the American Eagle Eaglet, Barling NL-1 triplane bomber, Bellanca WB-2 monoplane, Bellanca TES Chicago "Blue Streak," Boeing P-12 biplane, Boeing B-17 "Flying Fortress" bomber, Pitcairn-Cierva PCA-2 Autogyro, Cox-Klemin XA-1 hospital biplane, Curtiss-Wright Condor biplane bomber, Curtiss 5N Amphibian biplane bomber, Curtiss JN-4 "Jenny" biplane, De Haviland DH-4B biplane, Douglas DC-3, Fokker C-2 trimotor, Fokker D-7 biplane, Ford 5-AT trimotor, Kreider-Reisner Challenger biplane, Lockheed Vega monoplane, Loening Amphibian biplane, Mono Aircraft Monocoupe, New Standard D-25 J6 biplane, Vought VE-7 biplane, and Waco 9 biplane. Among the balloons and dirigibles depicted are Walter Kuhnert's hot air balloon, the Goodyear Mayflower blimp, the Goodyear Vigilant blimp, the Graf Zeppelin dirigible, the Hindenburg dirigible, and the Navy dirigibles ZR-1 and ZR-2. Pilots, parachutists, and aviation mechanics depicted include Johnny Abiuso, Johnny Betz, Andy Body, Pat Brooke, Paul Charles, Dick Cooper, Alton Eaton, Tim Fink, Walter Hallowell, Raymond Aldridge Hartman, Martin Jenson, Jesse Jones, "Colonel" Herbert Julian, Samuel Kuhnert, Walter Kuhnert, Billy Leonard, Charles Lindburgh, Shennon Lutz, Jimmy Mattern, John McFarlane, Hany McGee, Fred "Shorty" Nelson, Charles Oberdorf, Paul Setizinger, Walter Shaefer, Murray Shuman, George "Jack" Spaid, and Paul Strickler.

Manuscript Group 286: Penn Central Railroad Collection [ca. 1835-1968] (4,800 cubic feet)

The bulk of this collection consists of the: Records of thePennsylvania Railroad Company, [ca. 1847-1968]. The PRR was incorporated on April 13, 1846 and became by the turn of the century the "standard railroad of the world" and the largest single employer in the United States. Sometimes referred to as the world's first modern corporation, the PRR handled more business transactions and raised more capital than any other public or private sector organization of its time.

The collection contains materials relating to business, transportation and labor history. Included are the administrative and financial: Records of thePRR Comptroller, Presidents, Secretary (including: Records of theBoard of Directors and PRR Library), Vice President of Finance (including: Records of theTreasurer), Vice President of Real Estate, other Vice Presidents, Voluntary Relief Department and hundreds of Subsidiary Lines. Also included are over 1,000 cubic ft. of technical and engineering: Records of theVice President of Operation, including registers, historical cards and specification books of the Chief of Motive Power and Supervisor of Motive Power Expenditure; mechanical engineering drawings (tracings and blueprints) of the Mechanical Engineer, and architectural drawings of the Chief Engineer. The photographs are arranged into three series: the General Office Library Photograph File, donated to the State Archives in 1976, which includes a historical reference file of PRR photographs, ca. 1850-1960; Conrail Mechanical Engineering Department Photograph File was acquired by the State Archives in 1981 and includes nearly 2,000 prints, ca. 1930, primarily builders' views of locomotives and rolling stock interior views; the Penn Central Auction Photographs, obtained by the State Archives in 1972 when Penn Central began divesting its holdings, includes: PRR locomotives, snow and ice conditions, and suburban views.

Manuscript Group 287: Agnes James Spry Collection of Arthur James Memorabilia, 1938-1969 (.5 cubic feet)

Arthur H. James (b. 1883 - d. 1973) was governor of Pennsylvania, 1939-1943. Born in Luzerne County in 1883, James gra duated from the law school of Dickinson College, was admitted to the bar and began to practice law in Plymouth, Pa. in 1904. In 1912, he married Ada Morris, who died in 1935. In 1941 he married Emily Radcliffe Case. He was elected District Attorney of Luzerne County in 1920 and reelected in 1923. From 1926 to 1930, he was Lieutenant Governor of the state and also served as Judge of the Superior Court of Pennsylvania from 1932 to 1939, when he became Governor of Pennsylvania. As governor, he created the state's Department of Commerce and the Anthracite Emergency Commission, extended the Pennsylvania Turnpike, strengthened the civil service, and reinforced liquor control laws. Mobilizing the state's efforts during World War II, he created the State Council of Defense and the Selective Service Board, set up the Pennsylvania Reserve Defense Corps for home defense, and organized the Citizens' Defense Corps. James left office in 1943 and returned to his private law practice.

The collection consists of both handwritten and typed copies of a biography of Governor James written by his sister, Mrs. Agnes James Spry, in the mid to late 1950s. Also present are typed and handwritten speeches given by her brother, including his inaugural address, his campaign keynote speech, and others concerning taxes and the New Deal. One speech was given on December 10, 1941 following the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Miscellaneous items include a photograph of Governor James, a newspaper clipping of his 1941 wedding to Mrs. Emily Radcliffe Case, and a 1938 campaign brochure from his tenure as a Superior Court judge.
Manuscript Group 297 Mary Sachs Collection, 1929-1970 (2 cubic feet)

Correspondence, writings, photographs, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks and philanthropic memorabilia of Mary Sachs, a Harrisburg philanthropist, owner of successful Harrisburg and Lancaster retail stores, and founder of Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University. Mary Sachs (1888-1960) was active in the United Jewish Appeal and Israel Bond Campaign. The collection includes in addition to personal papers and photographs, business records covering the years 1932-1960 that contain correspondence from Eleanor Roosevelt and a 1933 letter from President Franklin Roosevelt. The photographs include both exterior and interior views of the Lancaster store taken in 1938, 1954, and 1956. The unpublished autobiographical articles, newspaper clippings and a paper by Milton Bernstein entitled, "Study of a Creative Woman," (undated) provides historical background.

Manuscript Group 303: G. Brognard Okie Architectural Papers, 1793, 1828-1949 (85 cubic feet)

Richardson Brognard Okie (b. June 26, 1875, d. December 25, 1945) was a Devon, Pa. architect who specialized in designing colonial revival style homes in the greater Philadelphia area. After studying mechanical engineering at Haverford College, he graduated from University of Pennsylvania in 1897. In 1896 he studied with the architect William L. Price and subsequently worked with Arthur S. Cochran. In 1898 he joined with H. Louis Duhring and Charles Ziegler to organize the office of Duhring, Okie and Ziegler in which he worked through 1918. Okie continued in independent practice until his sudden death in an automobile accident. In the year prior to his death a few projects were completed having the name Okie and Okie on the title block, marking the partnership with his son, Charles Okie.

Duhring, Okie, and Ziegler specialized in the then popular Cotswold and Pennsylvania farmhouse styles. After he began working independently, Okie specialized in the restoration and reconstruction of Pennsylvania colonial era buildings, restoring such landmarks as the Betsy Ross House in Philadelphia and the Paxton, Silver Spring, and Winchester Presbyterian Churches. In 1925 he was appointed by the Women's Committee of the Philadelphia Sesquicentennial Exposition to design the reconstruction of High Street and eleven years later the Philadelphia Chapter selected him as the architect for the reconstruction of Pennsbury Manor. In the latter project, he was guided only by the fragmentary remains of foundations, scraps of pavement and William Penn's letters of instruction to his steward James Harrison at Pennsbury. Okie designed many new colonial style residences along the Main Line and other Philadelphia suburbs and restored and expanded numerous colonial era dwellings throughout southeastern Pennsylvania. Hallmarks of his designs included undressed fieldstone walls having either pointed or struck joints, doors and window frames made out of solid oak or cypress, flat lintels having three stones including the center key, and segmental arches of the same undressed fieldstone. Particularly distinctive features of his work included prominent chimneys and spacious well-proportioned fireplace openings.

This series contains extensive correspondence and detailed architectural drawings for all of his major commissions including particularly the reconstruction of the manor house and ancillary buildings at Pennsbury Manor. Also present are detailed sets of specifications and photographs for many of his most important projects, historical pints and engravings used as research materials, a postcard file, records of accounts, and catalogs of architectural parts. The Edward R. Barnsley Papers contain correspondence and contracts relating primarily to the reconstruction of Pennsbury Manor. (Edward R. Barnsley was one of the commissioners of the Pennsylvania Historical Commission responsible for monitoring the progress of the Pennsbury Manor project.) The correspondence and architectural drawings are for most part arranged alphabetically by name of the client.

Manuscript Group 317: Mary Barnum Bush Hauck Papers, 1931-1979 (3 cubic feet)

Mary B.B. Hauck was a Harrisburg piano teacher and Pennsylvania State Supervisor of Music for the Emergency Education Program under the Works Progress Administration, 1937-1942. She organized the Dauphin County Folk Festivals, 1935-1961; and was director of USO program services at Fort Indiantown Gap, 1943-1946. Included are business correspondence, memoranda, lecture notes, music books, festival posters, newspaper clippings, photographs and materials acquired by Hauck during her career, 1931-1979. WPA materials also include original drawings by Edward C. Michener and printed posters by other artists of the WPA Art Project.

Manuscript Group 321: Charles T. Douds Papers, 1920-1978 (1 cubic foot)

Charles T. Douds (b. 1899, d. 1982) distinguished himself as a nationally recognized labor relations arbitrator with state and local governments. Beginning his career in 1933 as a labor compliance officer with the National Recovery Administration (NRA) in Pittsburgh, he served as a field agent with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) from 1937 to 1958, a director of the Bureau of Mediation for the State of Pennsylvania, 1958-1969; and president of the Association of Labor Mediation Agencies of the United States and Canada, 1958-1969. He also served on the Executive Board of The Pennsylvania State University's Alumni Association where, with his wife Ella, he established a scholarship fund for Penn State students having physical disabilities. The papers consist primarily of business correspondence, reports, publications, newspaper articles, brochures and other documentation of the Industrial Relations League for Social Justice, the Pennsylvania Security League and the League for Social Justice, the Pennsylvania State Mediation Board, and the Committee on Labor Management Relations and General Welfare. Also found are biographical materials; personal and professional correspondence; diaries, 1920-1980; photographs of National Labor Relations Board conferences, 1942-1943; and two papers authored by Douds. These are "The Douds NLRB Case" (April, 1980) and a Senior Honors Paper entitled "The Organized Unemployed, A Brief Study of the Nature and Activities of Unemployed Organizations with Special Emphasis on Those in Pennsylvania" that was co-authored with Katherine Naomi Monori in 1936.

Manuscript Group 342: George Howard Earle Papers, 1932-1939 (23 cubic feet)

George H. Earle III served as Democratic Governor of Pennsylvania from 1935 to1939. Born in Devon, Chester County on December 5, 1890, Earle attended Harvard University and served as a private in the Second Pennsylvania Infantry under General John J. Pershing during the Mexican Border Campaign in 1916. Earle enlisted in the United States Navy during World War I and after the war he distinguished himself in a number of businesses in Philadelphia including the Flamingo Sugar Mills, which he founded, and the Pennsylvania Sugar Company. During the 1930s he entered politics, supporting Franklin Roosevelt in the 1932 presidential election. His support won him appointment as United States Minister Plenipotentiary to the Republic of Austria in 1932, which post he resigned to run for Governor of Pennsylvania in 1934. During his term as governor, Earle obtained passage of the Equal Rights Act in 1935 prohibiting racial discrimination in hotels, restaurants, and places of amusement. After an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate in 1938, he served as United States Minister to Bulgaria in 1940 and Assistant Naval Attache to Turkey and Assistant Governor of Samoa from 1940 to 1945. He returned to private life in 1945 and died on December 3, 1974. The papers consist primarily of personal correspondences, transcripts of speeches, press releases and accounts.

Manuscript Group 355: Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra Records, 1931-1969, 1980 (3 cubic feet)

The Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra was established in 1929, along with the Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra Corporation. The two organizations merged in 1949 creating the Harrisburg Symphony Association. The Association provides the Harrisburg area with a symphony orchestra and promotes the advancement of music and young artists. The records consist primarily of scrapbooks, 1931-1969, and notebooks, 1936-1942, documenting the Symphony's history. Included are newspaper clippings of concerts and fundraising events from local newspapers; concert programs; minutes of the women's committee; etc. Promotional materials are also found for famous artists appearing with the Symphony over the years, including Eugene List, Szymon Goldberg, Ian Davis, Irene Jordon and conductor William Steinberg. Also included is a publication The Fiftieth Anniversary History of the Harrisburg Symphony Orchestra: 1930-1980, by Robert W. Fink.

Manuscript Group 367: Lawrie and Green Collection, [ca. 1922-1960] (10.4 cubic feet)

In 1922 Harrisburg architect M. Edwin Green (1896-1985) joined with Pittsburgh engineer Ritchie Lawrie (1890-1962) to form the Harrisburg architectural firm of Lawrie and Green. Disbanded in 1972, the firm designed several hundred buildings in central Pennsylvania and throughout the state including the North Office Building, the State Farm Show complex, the Dauphin County Courthouse, and the William Penn Memorial Museum and Archives Building in Harrisburg.

The collection consists primarily of black and white photographic prints and mixed media layout and design boards of Lawrie and Green's proposed or completed jobs in central Pennsylvania, especially Harrisburg, between 1922 and 1960. The firm specialized in the design of university and college campus buildings, churches, elementary and high schools, hospitals, and hotels. In addition to numerous public buildings in Harrisburg, the firm also designed the Lycoming County Courthouse, Williamsport; the Sunbury Hospital, Sunbury; the Hunt Library and Student Union Building at Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh; the Warren Municipal Building, Warren; and the Williamsport YWCA Building, Williamsport.

Manuscript Group 388: William A. Schnader Papers, 1922-1940 (4 volumes)

William A. Schnader (1886-1968) was Attorney General of Pennsylvania from 1930 to 1935. Admitted to the Bar in 1914, he served as Special Deputy Attorney General from 1923 to 1930 and was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for governor in 1934. In 1939, Schnader became a partner in the law firm of Schnader and Lewis (later known as Schnader, Kentworthey, Segal and Lewis). Schnader was active in representing Pennsylvania and in creating the Uniform Commercial Code. These papers consist of scrapbooks, 1922-1940 (primarily 1935-1940) containing newspaper clippings, black and white photographs of various sizes and memorabilia relating to Schnader's tenure as Special Duty Attorney General and Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and unsuccessful run for governor. Subjects include political campaigns, State Uniform Commercial Code Committees and activities, testimonials, greeting cards, banquet programs, ticket stubs and telegrams.

Manuscript Group 395 Donald H. Kent Collection, [ca. 1937-1975] (12 cubic feet)

Donald Harris Kent (b. May 2, 1910-d. July 6, 1986) was the Director of the Bureau of Archives and History of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission from 1961-1975. Dr. Kent was born May 2, 1910 in Erie, Pennsylvania and received a B.A. in History from Allegheny College, in 1931. He was an instructor in history at Allegheny College, Meadville from 1934 to 1935, a teacher of teacher of history at East High School in Erie from 1936 to 1937, a historian for the Frontier Forts and Trails Survey from 1937 to 1940, an Assistant State Historian for the Pennsylvania Historical Commission from 1940 to 1945, Associate State Historian of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission from 1945 to 1956, and Chief of the Division of Research and Publications of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission from 1956 to 1961. His other professional activities included Assistant Executive Secretary of the Pennsylvania Federation of Historical Societies, Editor, of Pennsylvania History; member of Council and of the Publications Committee for the Pennsylvania Historical Association, Member of the Board of Directors and Treasurer of the Pennsylvania Folklore Society and he was also an expert witness for the Government in May 1958, in cases entitled Seneca Nation v. United States, Docket No. 342-A, Tonawanda Band of Senecas v. United States, Docket No. 368-A, and Six Nations v. United States, Docket No. 344, before the Indian Claims Commission. His correspondence covers the period 1931-1986 and the Research Materials and Publications date from 1894 through 1984.

Manuscript Group 396: Milford H. Patterson Architectural Designs, [ca. 1940-1980] (90 cubic Feet)

Milford H. Patterson (b. 1910, d. 1983) was a registered Pennsylvania architect, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Architectural School, 1932, a charter member of the Pennsylvania Society of Water Color Painters, and a member of the American Institute of Architects. Before opening his own architectural practice in 1945, he was associated with J.A. & F.G. Dempwolf of York, H.R. Lenker of York, Granville E. Paules of Columbia, B.E. Starr of Harrisburg, Lawrie and Green of Harrisburg, James L. Minnich of Harrisburg, and W.L. Murray of Harrisburg. Patterson specialized in the design of churches, small businesses, apartment buildings, private residences, in addition to the alteration and additions to existing structures. Clients include UTZ Potato Chip Co., Hanover; Bethlehem Steel Co., Steelton; West Shore Country Club, Camp Hill; Hershey Chocolate Corp., Hershey; Zion Luthern Church, Harrisburg; and St. Paul's Lutheran Church, New Cumberland.

Contains primarily blueprints, drawings, and tracings of Patterson's proposed or completed jobs in South Central Pennsylvania, especially the Harrisburg area, and related business correspondence, ca. 1940-1980. Architectural drawings are arranged by Job Number, and related correspondence, specifications and accounts for architectural projects designed by Patterson are arranged alphabetically by project.

In addition there are artist conceptions or elevation drawings grouped by churches, synagogue, and social organizations; commercial buildings; public buildings; or residential buildings. Also present are architectural drawings arranged alphabetically, for proposals or projects in the preliminary stage, prospects with other architects, and miscellaneous projects. Of special interest are Patterson's designs as a student at the Architectural School of the University of Pennsylvania and matted or oversized drawings, which are stored separately.

Manuscript Group 397: M. Harvey Taylor Collection, 1896, 1901-1902, 1905, 1911, 1913-1917, 1929-1982 (1.1 cubic feet)

Maris Harvey Taylor (1876- 1982) was a Pennsylvania State Senator from 1941 to 1964 and served as President pro tem of the Senate from 1947 to 1964. Taylor was elected to Harrisburg City Council in 1907, held numerous Dauphin County offices from 1920 to 34, and chaired the Pennsylvania State Republican Party from 1934 to 1937. This collection is mainly comprised of personal correspondence (1902-1905, 1935, 1943, 1963-64, 1972-1982), newspaper clippings and photographs. Items of a political nature (correspondence, etc.) were lost in the 1972 flood that devastated Harrisburg.

Manuscript Group 400: Works Progress Administration Records, 1935-1943 (5 cubic feet)

The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was created by President Roosevelt in 1935 as a New Deal program to provide direct federal relief during the depression. This was a federally structured program, organized hierarchically by state, region, county, and finally, project-foremen. The WPA was a significant program which served to bind the region to the nation and that spent more than $10.5 billion between 1935 and 1943, employing over eight million people. The intent of the WPA was to provide work relief for the able-bodied unemployed. The WPA operated so that it covered the labor costs while a sponsor paid for the cost of material. The sponsors were usually state and federal agencies, counties, cities, boroughs, and towns. Some of the larger projects that were sponsored included large street and highway projects, construction of sidewalks and paved streets, as well as the development of storm sewers. Other less costly projects were also sponsored: abandoned mines were sealed; textbooks were cleaned and rebound; employees copied and catalogued ordinances for towns; buildings were remodeled; women operated sewing machines and produced clothing and blankets for the needy; murals were painted on business walls; and some groups presented dramas and musicals.

In the 1930's and 1940's the Historic Commission of Pennsylvania oversaw several WPA projects in Pennsylvania, including the Federal Writers Project and the Museum Extension Project. The Federal Writers Project, 1935-1943, was designed to employ white collar workers during the Great Depression. One project they worked on was the publication of comprehensive guides for each state (refer to RG-13 and also transcripts of official documents). Project workers in Pennsylvania published Pennsylvania: A Guide to the Keystone State, 1940, and Philadelphia: A Guide to the Nation's Birthplace, 1937, and many guides on individual counties and historical subjects.

Manuscript Group 408: Theodore A. Huntley Papers, 1920-1972 (6 cubic feet)

Theodore A. Huntley was a distinguished Washington newspaperman, journalist, and author. Born in Greenville, Michigan in 1888, Huntley spent his childhood and youth in Pittsburgh. After gaining newspaper experience in several western states, he returned to Pittsburgh as a reporter and editor for several Pittsburgh newspapers. In 1917 he went to Washington, D.C. to serve as secretary to Pittsburgh Congressman Guy E. Campbell and also worked as a Washington correspondent for the Pittsburgh Post and several other newspapers from 1918 to 1928. He worked as a political and special writer for the Washington Times from 1937to1938. Huntley's career included jobs as Information Specialist and Assistant to the Regional Administrator of the Federal Works Administration, Army Officer on active duty from 1943 to 48, Publicity Director of the Veterans Division of the Republican National Committee, Editorial Consultant, and journalist and freelance writer. He also served as Information and Editorial Specialist for the International Press Service of the Office of International Information and as Chief Congressional Correspondent of the Press and Publications Service, U.S. Information Agency. Huntley retired from the U.S. Information Agency in 1961. The papers include correspondence, newspaper clippings, diaries, notebooks, reports, and scripts.

Manuscript Group 409: Oral History Collection, 1970-1990 (1,038 audio tapes)

The Oral History Collection consists of taped interviews conducted throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania by staff members and Friends of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. These interviews shed light on the lives of southern-born African-American migrants, European immigrants, Hispanics, Jews and other ethnic minorities working in the coal, steel, and electrical industries.

Manuscript Group 416: Aero Services Corporation Photographs, [ca. 1926-1948] (over 4,000 items)

The Aero Service Corporation began in 1919 in Philadelphia and was a pioneer in aerial photography. Directed by Virgil I. Kauffman, a World War I veteran pilot who joined the company in 1924, the firm obtained lucrative government and private contracts including those with the United States Geological Survey and the Tennessee Valley Authority that involved some of the first aerial surveys of the country. Kauffman retained the original negatives of the firm until his death in 1985 and thereafter his survivors permitted the dispersion of the negatives to appropriate historical agencies throughout the country. In 1988 the Pennsylvania State Archives received those pertaining to Pennsylvania. The photographs include approximately 2,200 glass plate and film negatives in varying sizes, usually 8 x 10", 7 1/2" or 9" or 9 x 9", roughly dated between 1926 and 1939. There are very few original prints present. All are oblique aerial views primarily of the Philadelphia area and Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey towns. They are arranged numerically and feature factories, businesses, individual homes, housing developments, golf courses, sports arenas, etc.

Manuscript 422: Herbert Broadbelt Collection of Baldwin Locomotive Works Records, 1890-1940 (6 cubic feet)

Herbert L. Broadbelt was an employee of the Baldwin Locomotive Works who collected these materials that include approximately 17,500 negative and positive photographs, 3,500 statistical cards, menus, drawings, leaflets, circulars, rosters and indices created for marketing locomotives. The M.W. Baldwin Company was founded in Philadelphia 1831 as a jewelery firm and later manufactured, in partnership with David Mason, bookbinder's tools and steam-driven cylinders used for printing calico cloth. In 1883 Franklin Peale of the Philadelphia Museum asked Baldwin to construct a miniature locomotive for exhibition at his museum. The success of this model, and the subsequent construction of a full scale locomotive for the Philadelphia, Germantown, & Norristown Railroad, led to further requests for locomotives from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the Reading Railroad Company, and the Philadelphia & Trenton Railroad Company, among others. Baldwin also constructed numerous engines for railways in Brazil, Uruguay, Mexico, Germany, Argentina, Australia, and New Zealand. By the time construction was phased out in the early 1950s, Baldwin had built more steam locomotives than any other institution in the world. Late in the 1890s, in conjunction with Westinghouse Electrical Manufacturing Company, Baldwin also built small electric locomotives for mining and industrial use. By the mid-1920s, the company started experimenting with diesel engines, and by 1939, was producing diesel electric locomotives. In the early 1950s, Baldwin merged with the Lima-Hamilton Company and the Austin-Western Dump Car Company and became the Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton Company which continued in operation until 1972. The bulk of the records pertain to operations in the twentieth century and include bound books of photographs, locomotive specification drawings, correspondence, menus, histories of various railroads, leaflets, pamphlets, and specification note cards.

The collection is housed at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania, 300 Gap Road, Route 741 East, Strasburg, PA 17579 and inquiries should be directed to either the Site Administrator or Curator at (717) 687-8628.

Manuscript Group 427: Baldwin-Hamilton Company Records, [ca. 1834-1962]

The Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia, founded in 1832, built more steam locomotives than any other institution in the world by the time construction was phased out in the early 1950s. Late in the 1890s, in conjunction with Westinghouse Electrical Manufacturing Company, Baldwin built small electric locomotives for mining and industrial use. By the mid-1920s, the company started experimenting with oil and diesel engines, and by 1939, was producing diesel electric locomotives. In the early 1950s, Baldwin merged with the Lima-Hamilton Company and the Austin-Western Dump Car Company and became the Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton Company, which continued until 1972. The collection consists primarily of the engineering drawings for the locomotives produced, as well as various related indexes, registers, order books and specification books. The indexing system is incomplete and complicated and some gaps exist in the collection.

Manuscript Group 430 Paul Knepper Collection, 1941-1942, 1990 (1.8 cubic feet)

Paul Knepper, of Tamaqua, Pennsylvania, began working with airplanes at an early age, earning his pilot's license at the age of 16. Before graduating from high school, Knepper helped barnstorming pilots from 1928 to 1930, later completed an apprenticeship as a mechanic at Hometown Airport and Hazelton Airport from 1930 to 1935, and worked as a pilot, mechanic, and field manager at Schuylkill Airport from 1935 to 1936. Knepper worked for Douglas Aircraft Corporation in California from 1936 to 1938 when he accepted a position as Assistant Instructor at the Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics. He was appointed Head Instructor several months later and while at the Institute he drew the plans for his new plane, the KA-1 Crusader. In 1941 he established a factory in Lehighton, Pennsylvania. to market his plane commercially but with the advent of World War II commercial aviation ceased and factory workers found jobs in war industries. Knepper became supervisor of the NYA and National Defense Training School at the Airport, and joined the Civil Air Patrol for anti-submarine missions off Suffolk County, Long Island. The effort to produce the KA-1 commercially was never revived.

A group of pilots and mechanics who helped to build the plane in 1940 secured approval from Knepper's widow to restore the KA-1 Crusader. They began work in the fall of 1989 and completed the plane one year later. The aircraft and papers describing its history were donated to the State Museum in memory of Paul Knepper. All records relate to the construction and restoration of aircraft built by Paul Knepper.

Manuscript Group 439: Edward K. Barnsley Papers, 1932-1986 (2 cubic feet)

Edward K. Barnsley was a lawyer in Newton, Bucks County and Head of the Furnishing Committee of the Pennsbury Manor Reconstruction Project. The papers are of significance because they relate to Barnsley's early association with Pennsbury Manor from its inception as a historic site in the 1930s. For more information and records relating to Pennsbury Manor, Manuscript Group 394, the Pennsbury Manor Collection and MG-303, the G. Brognard Okie Architectural Papers.

Manuscript Group 481: Records of the Pennsylvania Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., 1919-2002 (8 cubic feet)

The Pennsylvania Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs is one of the charter members of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc., which was founded in 1919. Business and Professional Women's Clubs promote legislation and public policy issues of concern to working women and provide a variety of services and training to their members. In May 1918 the War Department invited two representatives from each state to meet in New York to plan for a national business women's committee. Lena Madison Phillips was elected as executive secretary of this group. Though the war ended, funding was nonetheless granted and in July 1919 the first National Convention was held in St. Louis, Missouri where the National Federation was established. The new Federation sponsored the first national survey of business and professional women and their status, opportunities and qualifications. The Federation established scholarship funds in professional schools, was the first women's organization to present a legislative tax bill to congress, and began publishing the magazine Independent Women. BPW was influential in passing child labor laws and in 1928 established the first "National Women's Business Week." In 1937, the BPW endorsed passage of an equal rights amendment and during the Second World War supported the establishment of women's branches in the service. During the 1960s, BPW led the fight for the Equal Pay Act, and in the 1970s also fought for passage of Title IX, equity in education and credit, prohibition of sexual harassment, and the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).

Manuscript Group 495: Landis Family Papers, 1840-1945 (80 cubic feet) - Housed at the Pennsylvania Farm Museum at Landis Valley

Originally created as a private museum during the 1930s by the brothers Henry Kinzer Landis and George Diller Landis who were noted collectors, the Farm Museum was eventually acquired by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission in 1953. In the words of Henry K. Landis penned in 1941, "...Here we find tools, artifacts, implements, vehicles, things actually made and used by the early inhabitants, presented for study rather than entertainment. Although there is much to amaze and surprise the novice, study and research is preferred." This is accomplished through preservation and interpretation of the largest collection of Pennsylvania German agricultural artifacts in the country and through the demonstration of: authentic traditional farming techniques, portrayals of rural village and industrial life, skilled craft demonstrations, historical breeds of animals, and historical plants. Landis Valley Museum is today a nationally recognized living history museum that collects, conserves, exhibits, and interprets Pennsylvania German material culture and heritage from the period 1740 through 1940. (The collection is located at Landis Valley Museum at 2451 Kissel Hill Road, Lancaster, PA 17601. To make arrangements to view these records contact the Site Administrator at 717-569-0401).

PA State Archives - Research Guides - WPA and New Deal Records

If you need further assistance, you may contact an archivist at ra-statearchives@pa.gov