State Archives >  Research Topics  > Environmental Resources Overview > Environmental Resources, RG 37-43
A GUIDE TO SOURCES ON ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY IN THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE ARCHIVES, Part 4: Record Group 37 through Record Group 43

RG-37
RECORDS OF THE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION

The Public Utility Commission was created in 1937 to regulate the intrastate rates and services of public utilities. The Commission replaced the Public Service Commission, which had been charged with that responsibility since its establishment in 1913. Created in 1907 and given powers only in regard to common carriers, the Pennsylvania State Railroad Commission had been the Commonwealth's first public utility regulatory agency. The State Railroad Commission was abolished when the Public Service Commission was given the authority to regulate all public-service companies except those engaged in interstate commerce.
The jurisdiction of the Public Utility Commission extends to gas and oil pipeline transmission, common carriers of passengers or property (train, bus, truck, taxicab, aircraft and ferry), and gas, water, telephone, telegraph, electric, steam and sewerage companies. Utility services provided by municipalities beyond their corporate limits are also subject to Commission regulation.



Secretary's Bureau
MINUTE BOOKS OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION & PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION
1919-1968
224 volumes

{series #37.2}

Arranged chronologically by date of meeting.

This series contains a record of the meetings and proceedings of the Public Service Commission, October 20, 1919 to March 30, 1937, and the Public Utility Commission, April 6, 1937 to November 7, 1968. These Commissions had the general and administrative power to supervise and regulate all public service companies conducting business within Pennsylvania. Information provided by the minutes includes the date and location of the meeting, as well as a record of attendance. Matters discussed during the meetings include the actions taken in regard to complaints and applications submitted to the Commission. The complaints and applications pertain to rate schedules, fare increases, operators as carriers for persons or property, the operation of transportation services in or between specified areas, utilities in specified areas, facility improvements, the failure to pay fines or damages, the failure to attain property and injury insurance.


MINUTE BOOKS OF THE PUBLIC UTILITY COMMISSION
1969-1986
app. 40 cu. ft.

The following accessions have not been processed. Dates of the documents are listed in parentheses.

  • 5001 (1983-1986)
  • 4368 (1983)
  • 4248 (1981-1982)
  • 3830 (1981-1982)
  • 3728 (1981)
  • 3612 (1981)
  • 3569 (1980-1981)
  • 3361 (1980)
  • 3234 (1979)
  • 3150 (1979)
  • 30 43 (1978)
  • 2844 (1977-1978)
  • 2654 (1975-1976)
  • 2562 (1976)
  • 2448 (1975)
  • 2381 (1974)
  • 2320 (1974)
  • 2262 (1973)
  • 2220 (1971-1972)
  • 2154 (1970)
  • 2075 (1969)

THREE MILE ISLAND INVESTIGATION RECORDS
1968-1988
22 cartons

{series #37.3}

Grouped by type of document.

The series has documents relating to the investigation of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant accident of March 28, 1979 and the financial consequences resulting from it. Included in this series are docket case files, residential petitions, testimony and exhibit files, hearing transcripts, Three Mile Island Unit 2 daily flow documents, and pre-incident, incident and post-incident documents, such as testimony and hearing transcripts, exhibits, correspondence, petitions, orders, and reports. Also found are related case items, including Public Utility Commission Docket Number 1-790404308, Pennsylvania Public Utility v. Metropolitan Edison Company and Pennsylvania Electric Company; and Three Mile Island Unit 1 docket 50-89 documents.



THREE MILE ISLAND INVESTIGATION DOCUMENTS & MISCELLANEOUS CASE PHOTOGRAPHS
1932-1986
0.5 cu. ft.
accession 3178
unprocessed


This series includes miscellaneous b/w photographs of Pennsylvania bridges and highways.



ANNUAL REPORTS OF NON-TRANSPORTATION UTILITIES
1914, 1922-1995
107 cartons

{series #37.4}

Grouped by accession number, there under grouped by type of utility, then alphabetically by name of company, and then chronologically by year.

This series contains financial and statistical statements of non-transportation companies, such as telegraph, telephone, water, gas, electric, and combination utilities, filed annually with the Rates and Research Bureau of the Public Utilities Commission. Information furnished varies by type of utility, but generally include each company's name and location, reporting period, type of utility, names of officers and directors, corporate structure, financial statements, and statistical tables that describe the physical system and services provided by the utilities.



RG-39
RECORDS OF THE PENNSYLVANIA GAME COMMISSION


The Game Commission is responsible for enforcing the Commonwealth's game laws relating to the management, protection and preservation of game, birds and fur-bearing animals. The Commission regulates the hunting and trapping of game, sets bag limits, operates game farms and employs game protectors. Created in 1895 as the Board of Game Commissioners, it did not begin its business until 1897 when the General Assembly approved a two-year appropriation of $200. Under the watchful eye of the Game Commission, the General Assembly began to pass laws protecting Pennsylvania's game animals. Wild ducks were protected in 1897, beavers in 1903, black bears in 1905, antlerless deer in 1907, mourning doves in 1913 herons and ravens in 1923, bear cubs in 1925 and elk in 1931.The first State Game Refuge was established in 1905 in Clinton County. In 1919, the Commission was authorized to buy land for game refuges and public hunting grounds and the following year the first State Game Lands were purchased. Under the administration of Governor Gifford Pinchot in 1923, the Commission experienced change. The terms of Commissioners was increased from three to six years. State game laws were codified. Land owners were permitted to kill deer for crop damage and the Commission gained permission to establish antlerless deer season. In 1925 the agency was given discretionary power to fix hunting seasons and bag limits.

The 1930s was a busy decade for the Game Commission. In 1931, the Commission was given the right to sell gas, oil, and mineral rights of game lands. In 1932 gypsy moth caterpillars first appeared in the Commonwealth, causing preservation problems in state forests and game lands. In 1934 the first beaver trapping season was established. In 1934, the first migratory waterfowl refuge in Pennsylvania was opened at the Pymatuning Dam. In 1935 Congress authorized the established of the Howard Nursery in Centre County. In 1936, the first game protecting training school opened at Brockway. That same year the Commission's game lands totaled more than 500,000 acres and the agency was authorized to sell game lands timber. The agency was renamed the Pennsylvania Game Commission in 1937.



Executive Office
The Executive Office consists of the Executive Director, an Executive Secretary to the Executive Director, Deputy Executive Director, a Budget Examiner, a Chief Counsel and a Policy Analyst.



MINUTE BOOKS
1897-1958, 1972-1976
9 volumes; microfilm roll 856

{series #39.1}

Arranged chronologically by date of meeting.

These are records of meetings held by the Pennsylvania Game Commission. Business discussed includes applications for licenses, revocations, petitions and complaints, land sales, personnel actions, and similar matters relating to the management of state game and refuge lands. The volumes cover the period from 1897 to 1958 and the microfilm covers the period from 1972 to 1976.



MINUTE BOOKS
1980-1994
7 cartons
accession #5075

unprocessed


MINUTE BOOKS
1992-1994
7 cartons
accession #3993

unprocessed


MINUTE BOOKS,
1958-1964
2 volumes
Accession #2883

unprocessed

Arranged chronologically

The minutes are collected in books 10 and 11. Book 10 covers the period 1958 to 1961. Book 11 covers the period from 1961 to 1964.


HISTORY FILE FROM THE GAME COMMISSION LIBRARY,
1895-1994
9 cartons, 4 flat boxes and 1 Hollinger box
{series #39.2}


Arranged alphabetically by topic, with some records at the end stored by type of record.

The series contains Game Commission records that cover more than a century. The records include annual reports, surveys, correspondence, copies of state game 1aws, scrapbooks, publications, complaints filed against the Commission; surveys of taxidermists and paid field officers on wildlife, financial reports on game refuges and game lands; reports on specific animals, records of Secretaries Joseph Kalbfus, Seth Gordon and Ross Leffler and blueprints of buildings for erection on game lands and farms. Items of interest to environmental historians include the following:

  • Articles and papers by Game Commission Secretary Seth Gordon circa 1922 to 1925 on topics such as "Wildlife and Water Supplies," "Forests and Our Games," and "The Relations between State and Federal Wildlife Conservation." These materials are found in a folder of ten articles by Gordon in carton one.
  • In carton two the folder "Deer Reports, News Release, 1952" contains a 1952 report on how "in 1951, the Commission issued 225,000 antlers-less deer license and hoped that 75,000 deer would be harvested. This reduction in the deer herd was necessary to bring it into balance with its food supply and to decrease crop damage. However, only about 38,000 hunters were successful because of increment weather during the two-day season, and as a result many thousands of deer died of starvation during the past winter."
  • Two folders labeled "Endangered Species Reports, 1981" are reports produced by the Pennsylvania Biological Survey at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. The documents list the species by scientific name, other common names, physical description, range, habitat, life history and ecology, basis of status classification and recommendations for conservation.
  • Carton two also contains six folders on "Game laws by Animals." The laws extend from about 1873 to about 1921. There is no arrangement within the folders. Pages on specific laws, however, do give the year of the law was enacted, the name of animal, open season time, the penalty for violation, date of law repeal, and hunting restrictions.
  • An unpublished autography of Dr. Kalbfus circa 1935 in manuscript form offers insight into the early days of the Pennsylvania Game Commission. The manuscript is in carton three.
  • In carton three, there are three folders containing the 1960 edition of the Pennsylvania Game Commission Manual.
  • In the same carton there are correspondence, drafts and minutes of the Game Commission extending from 1897 to1912, which were the early years of the Commission. Correspondence, however, is only found in the 1897-1900 folder and is mainly letters and memos exchanged between Commissioners about Commission business.
  • Carton three also contains newsletters. There are 1989 and 1994 editions of Drumming Log and two folders undated of the Weekly Newsletter of the Pennsylvania Game Commission. The latter is a rich source for commission news, pending legislation, conservation issues and notes about the hunting season.
  • Game Commission publications are also found in carton six. The publications are Descriptive Stories of Pennsylvania's Game and Fur-Bearing Animals (n.d.); Pennsylvania Trapping Manual (1979); Food and Cover for Farm Wildlife (1961); The Wild Tailed Deer in Pennsylvania (1979); Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area (n.d.); Middle Creek for Wildlife and People (n.d.); Hunting is a Booming Business by Joe Kosack (n.d.); and The Ruffled Grouse: Pennsylvania's State Bird (n.d.).
  • Carton six has a series of annual and biennial reports for the Game Commission, both to the Commission and to the Governor. Governor's reports include the 1924 1926 annual report, the 1943-44 biennial report and the 1968 biennial report. Commission reports are available for 1918, 1923, 1924, 1953, 1955, 1956, 1957, and 1971.
  • Seven additional reports, apparently penned by Commission staff or professional writers about various animals, cover the period 1924 to 1954. The reports are in carton seven.
  • Information about the administration of the first Game Commission Secretary, Dr. Joseph Kalbfus, is reflected in two publications in carton eight: Court Decisions Relative to Game (ca. 1905) and Sportsmen and Others Interested in Wild Bird and Game Protection in Pennsylvania by Counties (1908).
  • The administration of former Executive Director and Deputy Secretary Ross Leffler is richly covered in a series of bound and loose scrapbooks dating from 1931 to 1963. They are found in flat boxes 11, 12, 13, and Hollinger box 14. The latter also has a 1961 letter to Leffler from former president and vice president Richard Nixon.


CORRESPONDENCE, EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
1909-1939
1 cu. ft.
Accession #2585

unprocessed

The series consists of correspondence of Dr. Joseph Kalbfus, Game Commission Secretary from 1898 to 1919 and of Seth Gordon, Game Commission Secretary from 1919 to 1921 and from 1936 to 1948. The correspondence is chiefly with commissioners, commission staff and sportsmen's organizations. Topics include personnel appointments, financial expenses, passage of Senate Bill 46 in 1913, sportsmen's clubs, speeches by Dr. Kalbfus, state game refuges in state forests, and fundraising campaign to erect a memorial to Dr. Kalbfus. Kalbfus was a co-founder of the Pennsylvania State Sportsmen's Association. There is also a 1910-1911 biennial report and a 1922 annual report.


CORRESPONDENCE, DEPUTY SECRETARY
1957-1960
1 cu. ft.
Accession #2238

unprocessed

Arranged chronologically

The series is the out-going correspondence of Deputy Secretary Ross Leffler. The correspondence is with agency staff, sportsmen's organizations, other state agencies, conservation groups and the public.


LEGAL CASE FILES AND CORRESPONDENCE
1973-1995, 1990-1996, 1994-2001
ca. 8 cu. ft.
Accession #s 4841, 5006, 4379

unprocessed

Arranged by court case number and by name of case litigant.

The legal cases chiefly involve those brought by the Commission against violators of the State Game Commission Code. There are also civil suits brought against the Commission by individuals, local governments and companies. The case files are rich with legal documents and correspondence. The files from 1986 to 1994 are in two cartons and the files from 1994 to 2001 are in three cartons.


PUBLICATIONS,
1991-1999
Accession# 3318
0.5 cu. ft.

unprocessed

The box contains the following items:

  • Video, On the Trail of Pennsylvania's Black Bears, Pennsylvania Game Commission, 1991
  • Video, Pennsylvania Whitetails: Living With Change, Pennsylvania Game Commission, 1995
  • Video, Pennsylvania Elk: Reclaiming the Alleghenies, Pennsylvania Game Commission, 1999
  • Leaflet series, Wildlife Notes by Chuck Fergus, Pennsylvania Game Commission
  • Book, The Pennsylvania Game Commission, 1895-1995: 100 Years of Wildlife Conservation by Joe Kosack. (Harrisburg: Pennsylvania Game Commission, 1995).


RG-41
RECORDS OF THE NAVIGATION COMMISSION FOR THE DELAWARE RIVER AND ITS NAVIGABLE TRIBUTARIES


Port of Philadelphia
The legal status of the Port of Philadelphia was first defined in the City Charter granted by William Penn in 1701. That charter, now in the possession of the Philadelphia City Archives, designated that the county sheriff would serve as the water bailiff and also provided that the mayor, aldermen and common council could regulate the building of piers on the waterfront. In 1762 the General Assembly passed "An Act for the Recovery of the Duties of Tonnage Upon Ships and Vessels and Certain Other Duties Upon Wine, Rum, Brandy and Other Spirits and Upon Sugar" (Statutes at Large, 6, pp. 173-177). Enoch Story was appointed to the post of Collector of Duties.

An Act passed by the Provincial Assembly on February 8, 1766 provided for the appointment of Wardens for the Port of Philadelphia. The Wardens were responsible for issuing pilot licenses and making rules and regulations governing their service. The first Wardens were Abel James, Robert Morris, John Nixon, Peter Reeve, Oswell Eve, Michael Hulings and Thomas Penrose who were appointed under the Statutes at Large, 7, p. 19 on February 8, 1766 and reappointed on May 20, 1767. (Statutes at Large, 7, p.111). Peter Reeve, Michael Hulings, Robert Morris, Thomas Penrose, John Nixon, Oswell Eve, Robert White, John Maxwell Nesbitt and Samuel Mifflin were appointed on March 9, 1771 (Statutes at Large, 8, p. 58) and Luke Morris, Peter Reeve, Samuel Mifflin, Robert Morris, Thomas Penrose, Robert Whyte, and William Morrell were appointed on February 26, 1773 (Statutes at Large, 8, p. 264).

Following the outbreak of the American Revolution, Luke Morris, Samuel Mifflin, Samuel Howell, Captain Joseph Stiles, Captain William Heysham, Commodore Andrew Cardwell, and Captain Nathaniel Falconer were appointed on July 23, 1778 (Commission Book 1, p. 2). Legislation passed in 1803 provided for a Board of Wardens consisting of a Master Warden and six assistants. This act defined the powers of the Board to grant licenses to pilots, to make rules for their conduct, to decide disputes involving masters of vessels and ship owners, to direct the mooring of vessels and their loading and unloading, and to publish rules and regulations relating to these duties.

The Board of Commissioners of Navigation for the River Delaware was created in 1907 to assume those duties previously assigned to the Wardens for the Port, and the offices of the Harbor Master and Master Warden. In 1937, the Commissioners of Navigation were replaced by the Navigation Commission for the Delaware River and Its Navigable Tributaries. Originally established in the Dept. of Forests and Waters, the Navigation Commission was transferred to the Dept. of Transportation in 1970, to the Dept. of Commerce in 1976, and currently resides in the Dept. of State. The relevant statutory citations are Administrative Code, Act of April 9, 1929, P.L. 177, as amended, 71 P.S. 180-5; in the Act of May 29, 1803, P.L. 542, as amended, 55, P.S. 31, 32, 44, 71, 72, 72.1, 103, 132, 171, 172 and 176; and in the Act of May 11, 1889, P.L. 188, as amended 55 P.S. 41, 173.1-173.3 and 174. The regulatory citation is 4 PA CODE, Part XIII, Chapters 401-409.

The Navigation Commission of the Delaware River and its Navigable Tributaries has full power and authority to grant licenses to pilots and regulate the services they provide, promulgate regulations, and impose penalties on licensees who do not follow the Navigation Act and the Commission's regulations. The Commission also establishes regulations governing the application, qualifications, recruitment, selection and training of apprentices. The Commission consists of seven members and two ex officio members. Two of the seven members of the Commission must be residents of Delaware County, one must be a resident of Bucks County, and the Mayor of Philadelphia appoints two members. The ex officio members are the Secretary of the Dept. of Environmental Protection or his representative and the Director of Commerce of the City of Philadelphia. The president of the Commission is the Secretary of the Commonwealth. Related types of materials will be found among the records of the Delaware River Port Authority in Records of Special Commissions (RG 25).



PHOTOGRAPHS,
1917-1936, 1952
(1 folder)

{series #41.28}


Arranged mainly by date of image.

These are photographs from the Dept. of Wharves, Docks and Ferries (1917-1936) and the State Pilots' Association for the Bay and River Delaware (1952). The earlier sequence contains images of both dock and river views of the various piers, aerial views of the waterfront, pier elevations, and a few portraits. The views sometime depict the loading or unloading of vessels, interior views of facilities on the piers, and the vicinity of the waterfront. The 1952 material consists of portrait images of members of the Pilot's Association for the Bay and River Delaware giving the names of members depicted.



SCRAPBOOK, 1882-1898
(1 volume)
{series #41.41}


Arranged chronologically by date of item and indexed alphabetically by subject.

The scrapbook contains news clippings, correspondence, and photocopies of newspaper items relating to the port of Philadelphia. Subjects include the concurrent jurisdictions of Pennsylvania and New Jersey to the Delaware River, opinions of the city solicitor on the cleaning of docks into which the city sewers empty, opinions of the city solicitor regarding dredging, Delaware Pilot Land, and pilotage on coal laden vessels. Date and source of news clipping is sometimes given.



RG-43
RECORDS OF THE DEPT. OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES


Under the legislation that created the Dept. of Environmental Resources in 1970, the direction of the agency was placed under a Secretary of Environmental Resources who was appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. Responsibilities for managing and protecting Pennsylvania's natural resources were centralized in the Dept. of Environmental Resources under Act 275 of 1970, which abolished the Dept. of Forests and Waters and the Dept. of Mines and Mineral Industries. Under this Act, specific responsibilities for the protection of environmental resources previously vested in the Dept. of Agriculture, the Dept. of Health, the Dept. of Labor and Industry, and the State Planning Board were also transferred to the new Dept. of Environmental Resources. This new Dept. was charged with developing and protecting Pennsylvania's natural environmental resources for the social, cultural, and economic benefit of the citizens of the Commonwealth. In addition to managing Pennsylvania's air, forests, and natural waterways, the new Dept. also became responsible for regulating all mining activities. Under Act 18 of 1995 the Dept. of Environmental Resources was abolished and its powers and responsibilities were divided between the new Dept. of Environmental Protection and the new Dept. of Conservation and Natural Resources. For earlier related materials see also Records of the Dept. of Agriculture (RG 1), Records of the Dept. of Forests and Waters (RG 6), Records of the Dept. of Health (RG 11), Records of the Dept. of Labor and Industry (RG 16), Records of the Dept. of Mines and Mineral Industries (RG 45), and Records of the Dept. of Environmental Protection (RG 66).



Office of the Secretary
CORRESPONDENCE RECEIVED BY THE SECRETARY,
1986-1989
(8 cartons)

{series #43.1}

Arranged chronologically by date of letter.

The series consists of correspondence received by Secretary of Environmental Resources Nicholas DeBenedictis and Secretary Arthur A. Davis on a variety of subjects. Information is found, for instance on a proposed joint funding agreement between the Dept. of Environmental Resources and the United States Geological Survey, implementation of an "Automated Violator System" for documenting accidents and safety violations in coal mines, and installation of an innovative anthracite coal boiler by Fluidized Energy Company of Frackville at the State Correctional Institution at Frackville. A Waste Management, Inc. landfill application for Clearfield County and public concern over a Babcock and Wilcox plan for incinerating low level radioactive waste are also addressed. Other topics include indoor radon levels, the Texas Eastern gas pipeline, township sewage disposal projects, long range municipal waste planning, and the Pennsylvania Hazardous Waste Facilities Plan. Finally, there are many letters from division and bureau chiefs within the Dept. as well as letters from employees notifying the Secretary of their intent to retire and letters from job applicants seeking employment.


CORRESPONDENCE RECEIVED BY THE SECRETARY
1990-1991
1 cu. ft.
accession #2574
unprocessed


SECRETARY'S SIGNED CORRESPONDENCE
1991
1 cu. ft
accession # 2659
unprocessed



SECRETARY'S SIGNED CORRESPONDENCE
1990
1 cu. ft.
accession # 2522

unprocessed


SECRETARY'S SIGNED CORRESPONDENCE
1989
1 cu. ft.

{series #43.2}

Arranged chronologically by date of correspondence.

The series is comprised of correspondence signed by Secretary Arthur A. Davis concerning diverse subjects as implementation of the Low-level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendment Act, the underground storage tank identification program, mine reclamation activities, and letters congratulating employees on their retirements. Typical items found include letters documenting Pennsylvania's compliance with United States Environmental Protection Agency air quality standards and Unites States Nuclear Regulatory Commission standards. Also present is a cooperative letter of agreement between Pennsylvania and Delaware on coordinating responses to radiation emergencies. Many letters to citizens and citizen advisory boards concern such matters as mine reclamation, sewage treatment facilities, and air and water quality regulations.



SECRETARY'S SIGNED CORRESPONDENCE
1987
2 cu. ft.
accession # 2263
unprocessed




REPLIES FROM THE SECRETARY, CORRESPONDENCE
1990-1991
1 cu. ft.
accession # 2660
unprocessed




REPLIES FROM THE SECRETARY, CORRESPONDENCE
1990
1 cu. ft.
accession #2523
unprocesssed




Deputy Secretary for Communications
The Deputy Secretary for Communications was responsible for both the Dept.'s public relations activities and for soliciting public input in formulating Departmental policies and programs for protecting Pennsylvania's natural environment. One of the most important venues for public input was the public hearings held by the Environmental Quality Board.


ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY BOARD PUBLIC HEARING TRANSCRIPTS,
1971-1982
(13 cartons)

{series #43.3}

Arranged chronologically by date of hearing.

This series has transcripts of public hearings conducted throughout the Commonwealth by the Environmental Quality Board and related correspondence concerning the establishment and revision of water quality criteria. Hearings concerned issues like implementation of a construction grant priority rating system, acceptable standards for nitrate levels in groundwater, guidelines for controlling industrial waste and waste water treatment plants, air pollution control regulations, surface mining regulations, transportation control strategies, and camping fees in state forests. The hearing transcripts give the date of the hearing, the names of those who were present, and a transcription of the testimony presented. In addition,

  • Transcripts and correspondence on air quality are found for effluents from glass furnaces, zinc smelters, coke oven gas emissions from Bethlehem Steel Corporation iron furnaces and radioactive emissions from radiation producing machines and equipment.
  • Also present within this series are the complete texts of proposed regulations arranged in numerical order, Regulations cover sampling and testing procedures, fuel usage and emergency variances, disbursements from the Clean Air Fund, food protection, storage and handling of explosives, migrant labor camps, mobile home parks, public swimming and bathing facilities, registration and operation of snowmobiles, exposure to carcinogens, coal mining, and issuance of blaster licenses.
  • reports of environmental studies reviewed by the Board
  • visible emission data used by the Dept.
  • photographic evidence submitted at hearings.

For related materials see the Environmental Quality Board Public Hearing Transcripts (RG-43.37) and the Records of the Environmental Hearing Board (RG-67).



Deputy Secretary for Environmental Protection
The Deputy Secretary for Environmental Protection was responsible for directing the operations of the Bureau of Waste Management, Bureau of Mining and Reclamation, Bureau of Oil and Gas Management, Bureau of Radiation Protection, Bureau of Community Environmental Control, Bureau of Water Quality Management, Bureau of Laboratories, Bureau of Air Quality Control, and Bureau of Deep Mine Safety. The Deputy Secretary also sat on the Advisory Committee on Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control, the State Board for Certification of Sewage Treatment Plant and Waterworks Operators, the State Board of Certification of Sewage Enforcement, the Coal and Clay Mine Subsidence Insurance Board, and the Seasonal Farm Labor Committee.


CORRESPONDENCE LOG,
1981
(1 folder)

{series # 43.4}

Arranged chronologically by date of entry.

This is a log documenting replies to correspondence received by the Dept. from state legislators or the Governor's Office. Information given includes the date the letter was received, the name of the correspondent, a brief description of the subject of the letter, the surname of the person to whom the letter was assigned, the date assigned, and sometimes the date the reply was due. Pencil notations record the surname of the person who responded and the date of the response. Generally, the letters of inquiry were forwarded by various state legislators on behalf of their constituents.



DIRECT REPLIES CORRESPONDENCE LOG,
1976-1984
(9 folders)

{series #43.5}

Arranged chronologically by date of entry.

This is a log documenting replies to correspondence received by the Dept.. Information given includes the date the letter was received, the name of the correspondent, a brief description of the subject of the letter, the surname of the person to whom the letter was assigned, the date assigned, and sometimes the date the reply was due. Pencil notations record the surname of the person who responded and the date of the response. Generally, the letters of inquiry were received by the Dept. from private firms or individuals, though a few were forwarded by various state legislators on behalf of their constituents. Typical subjects include hearings on issuing strip mining permits, noise pollution, sewer line installation, and ground water contamination.



GENERAL MEETING FILE: SPEECHES AND TESTIMONY,
1971
(1 carton)

{series #43.6}

Arranged chronologically by date of document.

The series contains transcripts of speeches and testimony delivered by the Deputy Secretary before the American Public Works Association, the Association of Highway Officials, the Young Men's Christian Association, the Pennsylvania Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs, the Techno Society, the Pennsylvania Health Council, the Pennsylvania Petroleum Association, the American Academy of Environmental Engineers, the Soil Conservation Society of America, the American Public Works Association, the Advisory Council on Comprehensive Health Planning, the Pennsylvania State Senate Committee to Study the Non-returnable Bottle Problem, and the United States House of Representatives' Committee on Public Works. Also present are transcripts of speeches delivered at Drexel University, Susquehanna University, and before a Law Enforcement Workshop and a Solid Waste Symposium. This series was formerly known as "Speeches, Articles and Testimony of the Deputy Secretary."



LEGISLATIVE LOG,
1983-1984
(2 folders)

{series #43.7}

Arranged chronologically by date letter was received.

This is a log documenting correspondence received from the Governor's Office and various state legislators. Information given includes the date the letter was received, the name of the legislator or the Governor's Office Control Number, a brief description of the subject of the letter, the surname of the person to whom the letter was assigned, and the date of the response. Typically, the letters refer to such subjects as the Dept.'s environmental enforcement procedures, abandoned strip mines, and complaints concerning rodent infestations, sewage backups, well water contamination, and other environmental hazards.



REPLIES FROM THE DEPUTY SECRETARY, CORRESPONDENCE,
1970-1986
(4 cartons)

{series #43.8}

Arranged chronologically by date reply letter was sent.

The series has correspondence replying to letters received by the Deputy Secretary. Typically, the letter of reply is stapled to the original letter of inquiry. Information given includes the date the letter was received, the name of the correspondent, a brief description of the subject of the letter, the surname of the person to whom the letter was assigned, the date assigned, and sometimes the date the reply was due. Pencil notations record the surname of the person who responded to the Deputy Secretary with the information required for the response and the date of the response. Generally, the letters of inquiry were received directly from private firms or individuals, though a few were forwarded by various state legislators on behalf of their constituents. Typical subjects include hearings on issuing strip mining permits, noise pollution, sewer line installation, and ground water contamination.



REPLIES FROM THE DEPUTY SECRETARY, CORRESPONDENCE LOG,
1976-1984
(9 folders)

{series #43.9}

Arranged numerically by sequential number assigned at time original letter was received.

This is a log documenting replies to correspondence received by the Dept.. Information given includes the date the letter was received, the name of the correspondent, a brief description of the subject of the letter, the surname of the person to whom the letter was assigned, the date assigned, and sometimes the date the reply was due. Pencil notations record the surname of the person who responded and the date of the response. Generally, the letters of inquiry were received directly by the Deputy Secretary from private firms or individuals, though a few were forwarded by various state legislators on behalf of their constituents. Typical subjects include hearings on issuing strip mining permits, noise pollution, sewer line installation, and ground water contamination.



REPLIES FROM THE SECRETARY, CORRESPONDENCE,
1971-1986
(11 cartons)

{series #43.10}

Arranged chronologically by the date of the reply letter.

The series consists of replies by the Secretary concerning matters within the purview of the Bureau of Environmental Protection. Typically, the letter of reply is stapled to the original letter of inquiry. Some of these letters were sent by private firms or individuals directly to the Dept., though many were forwarded by various state legislators on behalf of their constituents and the replies were addressed to the legislators. Typical subjects of the letters include testing of drinking water, ordinances for sand mounds, a Chester County landfill, construction of a dam on Brush Creek, issuance of permits for strip mines, noise pollution control, sewer line installation, and ground water contamination.



REPLIES FROM THE SECRETARY, CORRESPONDENCE LOG,
1976-1984
(9 folders)

{series #43.11}

Arranged numerically by number assigned at time original letter was received.

This is a log documenting replies by the Secretary concerning matters within the purview of the Bureau of Environmental Protection. Information given includes the date the letter was received, the name of the correspondent, a brief description of the subject of the letter, the surname of the person to whom the letter was assigned, the date assigned, and sometimes the date the reply was due. Pencil notations record the surname of the person who responded and the date of the response. Generally, the letters of inquiry were sent by private firms or individuals directly to the Secretary, though many were forwarded by various state legislators on behalf of their constituents and the replies were addressed to the legislators. Typical subjects of the letters include testing of drinking water, ordinances for sand mounds, a Chester County landfill, construction of a dam on Brush Creek, issuance of permits for strip mining, noise pollution control, sewer line installation, and contamination of ground water.



Deputy Secretary of Public Liaison
The Deputy Secretary of Public Liaison of the Dept. of Agriculture was responsible for the press office that prepared information releases for the media and analyzed public reactions to the Dept.'s programs. When responsibilities for this position were transferred to the Dept. of Environmental Resources they were merged with those of the Community Relations Office that promoted participation by citizens in helping to shape Departmental policies and programs.



SPEECHES DELIVERED BY THE SECRETARY
1955-1977
(1 carton)

{series #43.12}

Arranged chronologically by date of speech.

Within this series are transcripts and drafts of speeches delivered by Secretary Maurice K. Goddard, Hydraulic Engineer A.J. Somerville, and Pennsylvania Soil Service Conservationist Ivan McKeever. Topics covered include soil conservation, water rights, flood plain zoning, water resources development, and the Delaware River Basin. Audiences included a Pennsylvania Vegetable Growers Conference, a public hearing of the United States Army Corps of Engineers, Pennsylvania Waterworks Association, Delaware Basin Survey Coordinating Committee, Interstate Commission on the Potomac River, Greater Erie Chamber of Commerce, Pennsylvania Electric Association, Swarthmore League of Women Voters, and the United States Senate's Committee on Government Operations and Select Committee on Water Resources.



Bureau of Air Quality Control
The Bureau of Air Quality Control developed and implemented programs to ensure compliance with the State Air Pollution Control Act and the Federal Clean Air Act through aggressive monitoring, by investigating citizen complaints, and by initiating remedial action to abate the sources of air pollutants. The Bureau also established procedures for announcing air pollution alerts, advised people living in the affected areas about the prevailing conditions, and provided guidance to industries and citizen groups.


AIR POLLUTION AND NOISE COMPLAINT FILES,
1971-1974
(4 cartons)

{series # 43.15}


Arranged by name of county and then by name of person or company. Public use of this series is restricted.


HEARING TRANSCRIPTS & POSITION PAPERS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY BOARD,
1971-1972
(2 cartons)

{series # 43.16}

Arranged chronologically by date of hearing.

Transcripts of testimony, correspondence and position papers submitted to the Environmental Quality Board on developing air pollution standards for Pennsylvania. Information given includes the date and location the hearing was held, the names of those present, transcripts of the testimony delivered, and occasional exhibits and position papers supporting the testimony.



Bureau of Community Environmental Control
The Bureau of Community Environmental Control planned, developed, and administered statewide programs for public drinking water supplies; food protection at eating, drinking, and shellfish establishments; and environmental sanitation at such public facilities as organized camps and campgrounds, public bathing establishments, schools, and seasonal farm labor camps. The agency also administered a vector control program to identify and resolve insect and rodent problems that might affect public health.



FISH WARDENS' RECORD OF POLLUTION COMPLAINTS AND FISH KILLINGS, 1935-1965, 1973-1984.
(5 volumes)

{series #43.18}

Arranged chronologically by date of entry.

The series contains a register of stream pollution complaints and fish kills reported to the fish warden. Information generally given includes the sequentially assigned report number, the date of the incident, the name of the stream, the cause of the incident, the name of the municipal jurisdiction, the name of the county, the name of the region, the name of the informant, the amount of any settlement, the name of the person completing the report, and the date the final report was sent to the file. Prior to 1973, the entries also generally give the date of the original petition to the fish commissioner, the date the petition was received, the cause of the complaint, the date the incident was referred for investigation by the commissioner, the name of the investigator, the date the report was received from the investigator, and a brief description of any accomplishments toward ameliorating the problem.



Bureau of Occupational Health
COAL INDUSTRY AND ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
ca. 1943-1964
(1 microfilm roll)

{series #43.50}

Arranged alphabetically by county.

The coal industry and environmental studies consist of correspondence and memos by the Director of the Bureau of Occupational Health and industrial hygienists to mine owners. Also included are activity reports and surveys on coal dust in mines conducted by the Bureau. These documents disclose the concentration of mine dust, laboratory sample reports, coal dust particle size, air samples, ventilation within the mine, levels of dust exposure within mines, and the bureau's safety recommendations.



INVESTIGATIVE REPORTS OF HEALTH HAZARDS IN INDUSTRIAL PLANTS, 1941-1973
(66 microfilm rolls)

{Series #43.51}

Arranged alphabetically by name of company, corporation or facility.

The Bureau of Occupational Health conducted inspection of industrial plants in Pennsylvania to monitor compliance with industrial hygiene standards. Only microfilmed reports are available in the State Archives. The reports give the legal owner's name, number of employees, number of male workers, whether plant does federal contract work, availability of industrial hygienist, availability of medical personnel, whether medical exam is required for new employees, and whether plant has a safety program. Attention is paid to identifying health hazards such as carbon monoxide, number of workers exposed to hazard and the bureau's health recommendations. Because the state Dept. of Health was responsible for occupational health inspections before the DER was created in 1970, a Health Dept. document, "Plant Information Report" appraising health hazards in industry, is also found here.



Bureau of Deep Mining Safety
When the Bureau of Mines and Mineral Industries was abolished in 1971 the Bureau of Deep Mining Safety in the Dept. of Environmental Resources became responsible for enforcing the Commonwealth's anthracite and bituminous coal mining laws, provided for the health and safety of people employed in or around coal mines, and protected the land upon which coal mining operations were conducted. The Bureau also had similar responsibilities for all metal and non-metal underground mining operations and maintained an index of abandoned mine maps. For related materials see also Records of the Dept. of Mines and Mineral Industries (RG-45).



ANNUAL REPORTS ON MINING ACTIVITIES,
1996-1997
(2 volumes)

{series #43.38}

Arranged chronologically by date of report.

These are annual reports issued by the Bureau of Deep Mine Safety under Deputy Secretary Robert C. Dolence. The reports give the names and addresses of fatal accident victims, the name of the mine, the name of the company, the date of the accident, the name of the mine accident inspector, a description of the accident, the cause of the accident, means of presenting similar accidents in the future, and any conclusions resulting from the investigation. The reports also provide statistical breakdowns of production levels for both the anthracite and bituminous regions. Production information given generally includes the total quantity of coal produced by each mine, the number of employees, and the quantity of coal shipped by rail, water, and truck. Alternate title formerly used for this series is "Annual Statistical Reports, Bituminous Coal and Anthracite Coal Mining Activities."



ANTHRACITE & BITUMINOUS INSPECTION REPORTS,
1971
(3 cartons)

{series #43.19}

Grouped by anthracite or bituminous district and arranged there under chronologically by date of inspection.

  • The series is comprised of safety inspection reports and correspondence relating to safety inspections of anthracite and bituminous coal mines. The safety inspection reports for strip mines generally give the permit number, dates of the preceding and current inspection, date permit expired, district inspection number, name and address of the company, name of the contractor, name of the operation, number of employees, county and township where located, evaluations of explosive handling and blasting procedures, adequacy of night illumination, adequacy of first aid facilities, quantity of monthly production, whether water had accumulated in the pits, whether the pits were being legally back filled, and whether the operators were properly bonded.
  • Safety inspection reports for deep mines give the anthracite district number; the name and address of the company; the location of the mine; date of the inspection; whether the mine was gaseous; the number of inside and outside employees; the name of the haulage way, gangway or local road as shown on the map; the volume of air entering the section; the gangway, breast or chamber number as they appear on the map; and a description of actions taken to correct unsafe conditions.
  • Electrical inspection reports give the name of the company, the location of the mine, date of inspection, name of the superintendent, name of mine foreman, name of electrical supervisor, name of mine inspector, name of the equipment in use, a description and location of the electrical units, a description of defects found and corrections ordered, and the results of final check inspections, findings, and orders. The correspondence generally consists of monthly safety committee letters and reports on breaker, washery, and bank inspection.


ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOUS MINE OPERATORS' ANNUAL REPORTS, MINE INSPECTORS' MONTHLY TONNAGE, MAN-HOUR AND ACCIDENT REPORTS, AND RELATED ITEMS,
1971-1978
(10 cartons)

{series #43.20}

Grouped chronologically by date of report.

The series is comprised of mine operator annual reports, mine inspectors' monthly tonnage reports, and man-hour and accident reports. The monthly reports give the name of the company, the name of the mine, the total number of inside and outside employees, strip mining tonnage, bank or river tonnage, total tonnage, number of days worked, number of man-hours inside, number of man-hours outside for the current month and for the year to date, number of fatal and lost time accidents of one day duration or more for the month and for the year to date, and the name of the breaker at which the coal was prepared. The annual reports are extracts of the cumulative monthly reports.



ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOUS FATAL MINE REPORTS,
1936-1974
(14 microfilm rolls, nos.6483-6496)

Arranged chronologically by date of accident report

The document "Employer's Report of Accident to Employee," gives specific data about both employer and employee. The name, address, business and job title of the employer reporting is provided. The name, address, age, seniority rank, wage level, country of birth and or citizenship, martial status of employee is given. Race of employee is not listed. The name of the insurance carrier, attending physician and/or hospital, state of witness, diagram of accident and date of employee's death is also listed.



Bureau of Legal Services
The Bureau provided routine legal services to the Dept. with the exception of providing enforcement or counsel on legal matters with respect to statutes and regulations within the Dept.'s jurisdiction that provided for the alleviation of nuisances, pollution, or other damage to the environment. Legal advice concerning such matters fell within the purview of the Bureau of Regulatory Counsel.



HEARING AND LEGAL OPINIONS,
1956, 1965-1972
(11 cartons)

{series #43.21}

Arranged more or less chronologically by date of opinion rendered.

  • Here are transcripts of hearings and legal opinions issued in cases of litigation involving the Dept. of Forests and Waters. Among these are materials covering 109 cases involving more than twenty Pennsylvania industrial firms..
  • Materials are also present for Sanitary Water Board cases involving such private firms as Sunbeam Coal Corporation, Kristianson & Johnson Coal Company, Pennsylvania Power and Light Company, G &M Poultry Company as well as the boroughs of Girard, Albion, Taylor, Minersville, Old Forge, Palo Alto, and Port Carbon, and for the City of Pottsville.
  • Air pollution case files pertain to firms as Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Babcock & Wilcox Company, Erie-Lackawanna Railroad Company, P.H. Glatfelter Company, Duquesne Light Company, and Cloisterdale Farms, Inc.
  • Finally, there are litigation files concerning park land acquisition and the National Powder Company and transcripts of water quality criteria hearings concerning the Lehigh River and the Delaware River Estuary.


Bureau of Mining and Reclamation
The Bureau of Mining and Reclamation now operates within the Dept. of Environmental Protection that was created when the Bureau of Environmental Resources was abolished in 1995. Earlier records relating to mine reclamation descended from the Dept. of Mines and Mineral Industries and were inherited by the Dept. of Environmental Resources in 1970. The Bureau administers an environmental regulatory program for all mining activities, mine subsidence regulation, and coal refuse disposal. It also administers mining license and permit programs, a regulatory program for the storage and use of explosives, and a loan program for bonding of anthracite mines. In addition, the Bureau administers the mine subsidence insurance program, the small coal operator's assistance and areas unsuitable for mining programs, and engages in research to prevent and abate mine drainage problems. The Anthracite and Bituminous Coal Mine Subsidence Fund was created by Act No. 484, P.L. 1068, on August 23, 1961 for the purpose of insuring homeowners against damage caused by coal mine subsidence.


PERMITS DIVISION MAPS,
UNDATED
(29 microfilm rolls)

{series #43.22}

Arranged numerically by division number.

The series contains microfilm copies of aerial maps prepared by the Bureau of Land Protection's Division of Mine Subsidence Regulation for Luzerne County and similar areas affected by subsidence caused by coal mining activity. The search room finding aid provides a breakdown of the areas covered division number. These maps were microfilmed by the Dept. of Environmental Resources circa 1976.



Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey
The Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey was responsible for preparing topographical and geological survey maps of the Commonwealth. Information provided by research conducted by the Survey was used for developing the comprehensive state water plan.



MINUTES OF THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON THE STATE WATER PLAN,
1968-1971
(1 folder)

{series #43.23}

Arranged chronologically by date of meeting.

These are the minutes of the Subcommittee on the State Water Plan charged with ensuring the preservation of Pennsylvania's water and related land resources. Information given includes hydrologic projections of water availability developed in cooperation with the Dept. of Forests and Waters. Information given includes the date of the meeting, the names of those in attendance, and a summary of the discussion.



MINUTES OF THE WATER RESOURCES COORDINATING COMMITTEE,
1966-1970
(1 box)

{series #43.24}

Arranged chronologically by date of meeting.

In this series are minutes of the Water Resources Coordinating Committee that was charged with implementing the Clean Water Restoration Act of 1966 (P.L. 89-753). The minutes document the coordination of activities that took place between the Dept. of Agriculture, Dept. of Commerce, Dept. of Health, Dept. of Highways, Dept. of Internal Affairs, Dept. of Mines and Mineral Industries, Pennsylvania Fish Commission, Pennsylvania Game Commission, and the State Planning Board. Information given includes the date of the meeting, the names of those in attendance, and a summary of the discussion.



MINUTES OF THE WATER SUPPLY TASK FORCE OF THE WATER RESOURCES COMMITTEE,
1970-1971.
(1 folder)

{series #43.25}

Arranged chronologically by date of meeting.

In this seres are minutes of the Water Supply Task Force of the Water Resources Coordinating Committee that was charged with defining the respective responsibilities of the Dept. of Commerce, Dept. of Agriculture, Dept. of Health, Dept. of Community Affairs, Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey, and the Dept. of Forests and Waters in preserving and managing Pennsylvania's water resources. Information given includes the date of the meeting, the names of those in attendance, and a summary of the discussion.


COMPREHENSIVE WATER AND WASTEWATER MANAGEMENT PLANNING STUDY FILES,
1973-1984
(16 cartons)

{series #43.26}

Grouped into a general category, nine study areas, and maps.

The series continas planning study materials consisting of photographic slides, specifications and comprehensive water and wastewater study reports prepared by the Bureau of Water Quality Management. Among the materials found are technical proposals by a variety of private engineering firms for managing water quality in each of the nine study areas and draft water quality management plans developed by regional planning commissions in the respective study areas. Maps delineate steep slopes, types of rock, mineral extraction sites, tendency for soil erosion, groundwater pumping areas and groundwater over-pumping areas, recreation areas, historic sites, natural and conservation areas, existing and proposed water supply and wastewater treatment facilities, and sites of existing industrial wastewater discharges. Also present are maps depicting geologic problem areas, geologically unique areas, soil associations with parent materials, soil limitations for both conventional and alternate on-lot sewage disposal systems, potential yield of major aquifers, the presence of woodlands, and proximity of industrial waste discharges and existing municipal wastewater treatment facilities.



REPORT
1971
(1 box)

{series #43.27}

In this series is the final Report of the Pennsylvania Sanitary Water Board, 1923-1971, (Publication #29 of the Pennsylvania Dept. of Environmental Resources Bureau of Water Quality Management). The report contains a history of the Sanitary Water Board from its inception, documents field trips and Hearings held by the Board, and summarizes innovations in waste treatment achieved during the 1960s. Also present in the container are lists of names of members of the board and their periods of tenure.



Bureau of Water Resources Management
The Bureau of Water Resources Management directed and coordinated water resource management activities for the Dept. by planning and managed the Commonwealth's water and related land resources. This included implementing water conservation and allocation measures, conducting hydroelectric power feasibility studies, managing coastal zones, and preserving Pennsylvania's scenic rivers and waterways. The Bureau also provided Commonwealth representation in comprehensive water resource studies, river basin commissions, and operational planning for federal and other agencies in areas affecting Pennsylvania.


DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ABATEMENT SCHEDULES,
1969-1973
(1 folder)

{series #43.28}

Arranged chronologically by date abatement schedule was issued.

The series has the abatement schedules approved by the River Basin Commission for reducing discharges of effluents into the Delaware River Basin. The schedules give the docket number, the name of the company, the zone location, a summary of the proceedings, the findings of the Commission, and a detailed schedule specifying the actions to be taken and the dates by which each action was to occur.



DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION APPROVED APPLICATIONS,
1962-1975
(2 cartons)

{series #43.29}

Arranged chronologically by date decision was rendered.

Here are the approved applications having attached the text of the decision rendered by the Commission and a detailed specification of the conditions upon which the approval was contingent. Information given includes the name and address of the project sponsor, the docket number, the date of the decision, a description of the proposed project, the name of the agency from which the application was referred, a description of the actions taken by the Commission, and occasional explanatory notes.



DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION MINUTES,
1961-1975
(1 carton)

{series #43.30}

Arranged chronologically.

Here are the minutes of the meetings of the Delaware River Basin Commission documenting the processing of applications, the development of abatement schedules, and the passage of resolutions. Information given includes the date of the meeting, the names of those present, and a description of the discussion and business transacted.



DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION RESOLUTIONS,
1961-1970
(1 folder)

{series #43.31}

Arranged numerically by resolution number.

The series has resolutions by the Delaware River Basin Commission aimed at protecting the natural waterways of the Basin. Also present is a copy of the Temporary Rules and Regulations Governing the Delaware River Basin Commission. Information found about each resolution includes the resolution number, the text of the resolution, the date of the Commission minutes in which the resolution was passed, and the item number.



DELAWARE RIVER BASIN FILES,
1941-1980
(9 cartons, 1 box)

{series #43.32}

Arranged chronologically.

Minutes, correspondence, preliminary and draft reports, and related papers of the Interstate Commission on the Delaware River Basin are in this series. The organization was formed through reciprocal legislation enacted in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and Delaware in 1949. It was to prepare a survey on the feasibility of constructing integrated water projects designed to meet combined prospective water needs of the region. With its activities responsibilities ranging over a formidable section of the Atlantic seaboard, the Commission stirred considerable public debate.

  • Among the items present is a report of a study sponsored by the National Science Foundation and organized by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences entitled "Research Needs Concerning Incorporation of Human Values Into Environmental Decision Making," (Princeton University, 1975).
  • There are also a number of reports prepared by independent consulting firms having such titles as "A Comprehensive Study of the Tocks Island Lake Project and Alternatives" and "Boundaries of Analysis: An Inquiry into the Tocks Island Dam Controversy" edited by Harold A. Feiverson, Frank A. Sindan, and Robert H. Socolow.
  • Scattered throughout the files are letters and papers relating to various Water Quality Conferences attended by members of the Commission.


POTOMAC RIVER BASIN FILES,
1961-1980
(5 cartons)

{series #43.33}

Grouped by type of material and arranged there under chronologically.

The series has the minutes, correspondence, consultant reports, and workshop papers of the Interstate Commission of the Potomac River Basin. The materials provide information concerning the proposed construction of dams and reservoirs in the Potomac River Basin, coordination of long-range objectives, and the impact of such projects on the natural environment of the region.



SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION MINUTES,
1973-1975

{series #43.34}

Arranged chronologically.

The series has the minutes, correspondence, and press releases of the Susquehanna River Basin Commission that was formed in the aftermath of failures of the electrical power grid cause by Hurricane Agnes in 1972 that hampered efforts to forecast flood levels on the lower Susquehanna River. By 1975, the work of this Commission resulted in the approval to spend $70,000 over five years to install and maintain twenty-one satellite data transmission platforms to improve flood forecasting in the Basin and the implementation of a water quality monitoring program to assess the impact of water pollution, monitor mine drainage abatement, and identify water source problem areas.


Environmental Hearing Board
Created on paper in 1970 by the statute that created the Dept. of Environmental Resources, the Environmental Hearing Board only became a reality on February 1, 1972. It was composed of three members nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate and had jurisdiction over appeals to orders, permits, licenses or decisions issued by the Dept.. In 1995 the Board became part of the Dept. of Environmental Protection where it continues to hold hearings and issue judgments on appeals to decisions rendered by that agency. For related materials see also Records of the Environmental Hearing Board (RG-67).


ADJUDICATIONS,
1971-1984
(291 cartons)

{series #43.35}

Arranged chronologically by year and there under numerically by docket number.

Indexed alphabetically by subject in Room 116 at the State Library of Pennsylvania under Environmental Hearing Board Adjudications, 1972 (Call #Pa. Reports.) and Adjudications and Opinions, 1989 (Call #PY E62.1).
Transcripts of testimony, legal briefs, and adjudication decisions of cases adjudicated by the Environmental Hearing Board involving townships, municipalities, private firms, and private individuals concerning pollution of Pennsylvania's land, water, and air resources. Information given includes the docket number, the name of the defendant, the names of individuals appearing on behalf of the Board and of the defendant, the names of witnesses, the legal argument prepared on behalf of the defendant, the transcript of the hearing, and the text of the adjudication decision.


ADJUDICATIONS
1984-1985
31 cu. ft.
acccession # 2263

unprocessed


MINUTES,
1971-1979, 1981-1983
(6 cartons)

{series #43.36}

Arranged chronologically and grouped there under by type of document.

Minutes, resolutions and formal legislative reference bureau filings of the Environmental Quality Board and correspondence of the Citizen Advisory Council concerning air quality regulations, forestry regulations, community environmental control regulations, oil and gas regulations, and Environmental Quality Board procedures. Information found includes the names of members and other persons present at meetings, the date of the meeting, transcripts if both regular and informal meetings, and reports submitted concerning establishment of water quality criteria, wastewater treatment requirements, and industrial wastes.


PUBLIC HEARING TRANSCRIPTS
1971-1982
(15 cartons)

{series #43.37}

Arranged chronologically, and grouped there under by type of material.

Transcripts of testimony given before hearings of the Environmental Hearing Board held in Philadelphia, Harrisburg, and Pittsburgh concerning implementation of air pollution regulations in Pennsylvania. Also included are letters, drafts of proposed air pollution control regulations, and implementation plans. Information found includes the names of those giving testimony, a transcript of the testimony, and the exhibits used to support the testimony. Included among the exhibits is photographic evidence and two motion picture films entitled "Charging Operations at Clairton Coke Works" (1977) and "Bethlehem Steel Corporation Franklin Coke Works, Johnstown Plant, Battery 17" (1976). Copies of regulations are present concerning sampling and testing procedures, fuel usage and emergency warnings, food protection, storage and use of explosives, housing and recreational facilities, migrant labor camps, mobile homes, operation and registration of snowmobiles, and protecting occupational health.



PUBLIC HEARING TRANSCRIPTS
1980
3 cu. ft.
accession # 2437
unprocessed



Environmental Quality Board
MINUTES
1980
1 cu. ft.
accession # 2436

unprocessed



Management Services for Environmental Protection
The Bureau of Management Services granted plant certifications for sewage treatment plants and waterworks and was administered a Deputy Secretary of Environmental Protection. The Deputy Secretary also sat on the State Board of Certification for Sewage Treatment Plants and Waterworks Operators, the State Board of Certification of Sewage Enforcement Officers, the Coal and Clay Mine Subsidence Insurance Board, and the Seasonal Farm Labor Committee.


______________________________________________________________________________

MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD FOR CERTIFICATION OF SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS AND WATER WORKS,
1969-1979
(1 carton)

{series #43.39}

Arranged chronologically by date of meeting.

Minutes of meetings at which the Board granted certification to operate for sewage treatment plants and waterworks. Information given includes the date of the meeting, the names of those present, transcripts of the business transacted and actions taken. Tables generally give the name of each applicant, the type of certificate requested, the applicant's examination score, the number of years and months of experience operating that type of facility, the number of months of additional experienced required, and the level of certificate recommended to be granted.



Bureau of Forestry Library Materials

The original Forest Commission, created in 1893 to investigate and report on the condition of Pennsylvania's forests, became the Division of Forestry within the Dept. of Agriculture by an Act passed on March 13, 1895. By the Act of February 25, 1901, the Division was transformed into the independent Dept. of Forestry charged with purchasing, developing and caring for Pennsylvania's State forests. In 1923 the Dept. of Forestry became the Bureau of Forestry within the Dept. of Forests and Waters. When the Dept. of Forests and Waters was abolished in 1970, the following records descended to the Dept. of Environmental Resources. For related types of materials see also related records in Records of the Dept. of Forests and Waters (RG-6).


REPORT ON U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEYS WEST OF THE ONE HUNDREDTH MERIDIAN, ENGINEERING DEPT., U.S. ARMY,
1878
(microfilm roll 4236)


{series #43.40}


Indexed internally alphabetically by subject.

These are reports upon the botanical collections made in portions of Nevada, Utah, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona from 1871 to 1875 by Joseph T. Rothrock, a Professor of Botany at the University of Pennsylvania who later became Pennsylvania's first Forestry Commissioner. The report constituted volume 6 of an 8 volume Report upon United States Geological Surveys West of the One Hundredth Meridian that were conducted under First Lieutenant George M. Wheeler and directed by Brigadier General A. A. Humphries under the Acts of Congress passed on June 25, 1874 and February 15, 1875 and published by the United States Government Printing Office in 1878. Illustrated with thirty plates, the report provides detailed descriptions of plant specimens collected by Joseph Rothrock.



REPORT OF THE FORESTRY COMMISSION FOR THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,
1894-1895
(microfilm rolls 4236 & 4237)

{series #43.41}

Pennsylvania Forestry Commissioner Joseph T. Rothrock and Engineer William F. Shunk submitted this report to the Governor and the General Assembly circa March 18, 1895. The report contains texts of acts of the Assembly relating to forestry and timberlands, a description of the condition of Pennsylvania's original forests, a chapter on waste areas and the exemption of timberlands, a chapter on state forest lands, an analysis of the threat of forest fires, a report on the repair and maintenance of highways and bridges, a report on sugar maples by A. C. Sisson, a report on the charcoal industry, a report on the destruction of pitch pine forests by the pitch pine beetle, a report on methods employed in conserving German forests by F. R. Mein, a catalog of Pennsylvania trees, and descriptions of cleared and timber lands in each county. As a result of this report, a division of Forestry was created within the new Dept. of Agriculture in 1895. For more information on the forestry commission of 1887-1889 see the records of the State Forestry Commission in Records of Special Commissions (RG 25).


FORESTRY COMMISSION CORRESPONDENCE,
1899-1901
(microfilm rolls 4238-4240)

{series #43.42}

Arranged chronologically by date and indexed internally alphabetically by surname of correspondent.

One volume documenting correspondence sent by Forestry Commissioner Joseph Rothrock primarily concerning the purchase of land to establish state forest reserves. Information given generally includes the name and address of the person to whom the letter was sent, the date of the letter, and information concerning the location of tracts of land proposed to be acquired and the amounts to be paid for purchase or to acquire timber rights.


FORESTRY COMMISSION CORRESPONDENCE,
UNDER ACT OF 1901, 1901.
(microfilm rolls 4238-4240) [DOUBLE CHECK]

{series #43.43}

Arranged chronologically by date of correspondence.

Indexed internally alphabetically by surname of correspondent.

One volume documenting correspondence sent by Forestry Commissioner Joseph Rothrock under the Act of 1901 concerning the purchase of land to establish state forest reserves. Information given generally includes the name and address of the person to whom the letter was sent, the date of the letter, and information concerning the location of tracts of land proposed to be acquired and the amounts to be paid for purchase or to acquire timber rights.


GENERAL FORESTRY CORRESPONDENCE,
1899-1901
(microfilm rolls 4238-4239)

{series #43.44}

Arranged chronologically by date of correspondence. Indexed internally alphabetically by surname of correspondent.

One volume documenting correspondence sent by the Clerk of the Commissioner of Forestry Robert E. Criklin primarily concerning the purchase of land to establish state forest reserves. Information given generally includes the name and address of the person to whom the letter was sent, the date of the letter, and information concerning the location of tracts of land proposed to be acquired and the amounts to be paid for purchase or to acquire timber rights.


GENERAL FORESTRY CORRESPONDENCE,
UNDER ACT OF 1901, 1901-1903
(microfilm rolls 4238, 4239, and 4240)

{series #43.45}

Arranged chronologically by date of correspondence. Indexed internally alphabetically by surname of correspondent.
One volume documenting correspondence sent by the Clerk of the Commissioner of Forestry Robert E. Criklin under the Act of 1901 concerning the purchase of land to establish state forest reserves. Information given generally includes the name and address of the person to whom the letter was sent, the date of the letter, and information concerning the location of tracts of land proposed to be acquired and the amounts to be paid for purchase or to acquire timber rights.


FORESTRY RESERVATION COMMISSION MINUTE BOOKS,
1899-1920
(3 microfilm rolls 4241-4243)

{series #43.46}

Arranged chronologically by date of meeting.

Four volumes containing the minutes of regular meetings of the Forest Reservation Commission that met in Harrisburg commencing on December 14, 1899 under the terms of an Act to secure state forestry reservations passed on May 28, 1899. Chaired by Forestry Commissioner Joseph T. Rothrock of West Chester, the Commission also consisted of Deputy Secretary of Internal Affairs Isaac Brown of Corry, President of the State Board of Health John Fulton of Johnstown, and A. C. Hopkins of Lock Haven and Albert Lewis of Bear Creek in Luzerne County who were appointed by the Governor. Information found in the minutes frequently includes the names of the county and township in which tracts of land to be acquired were located, the warrantee name of the tract, the number of acres and perches encompassed by the tract, and the number of years reserved for removal of timber. Also given are the names of individuals submitting vouchers for payment of expenses incurred during the month for administering the work of the Forestry Reserve Commission and the amount each was paid.


MINUTES OF THE STATE FOREST COMMISSION,
1921-1922
(microfilm roll 4243)

{series #43.47}

Arranged chronologically by date of meeting.

Minutes and correspondence of the State Forest Commission of the Dept. of Forestry. Information found includes the names of individuals from whom land was purchased, the location of the tract, and the amount paid per acre for the land. There is also a fair amount of material concerning apparent restructuring of the way the Commission conducted business including letters to other agencies and to private firms and individuals. Many letters are signed by Forest Commissioner Gifford Pinchot.



PHOTOGRAPHS OF STATE PARKS AND NATURAL AREAS,
1936-1950
(1 box)

{series #43.52}

Arranged alphabetically by topic.

Thirty-one state parks and natural areas are represented here.Three sites have multiple images, i.e. Washington Crossing State Park, Promised Land State Park, and Pymatuning State Park. The photographs depict both people and nature settings.



Bureau of Sanitary Engineering
The Bureau of Sanitary Engineering acted as an administrative arm of the Sanitary Water Board in the Dept. of Health under the Administrative Code of 1923 (P.L. 498, Act. #274). The Bureau conducted extensive water quality studies, developed long range plans for managing water, and examined plans for issuing construction permits for sewage treatment, industrial waste treatment, and mine drainage projects. During periods of flooding, droughts, and epidemics, the Bureau supplied resources in assisting with the supervision of emergency sanitation measures. When the Sanitary Water Board was abolished under Act 274 (P.L. 834) in 1970, the Bureau of Sanitary Engineering was transferred to the Dept. of Environmental Resources. For related materials see Records of the Dept. of Health (RG-11).



WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE MONONGAHELA RIVER BASIN,
1971
(1 volume)

{series #43.48}

Publication # 29 contains the official report of the conference called by the administrator of the United State Environmental Protection Agency on Interstate Pollution of the Waters of the Monongahela River held in Pittsburgh on August 24-25, 1971. Presented by Walter A. Lyon, Director of Sanitary Engineering in the Pennsylvania Dept. of Environmental Resources, the report describes the river basin and summarizes the legislative and enforcement status of Pennsylvania's water quality management regulations concerning sewage treatment, industrial waste, mine drainage, and soil erosion. Included here are pollution control studies of the basin, a description of existing uses of the river, and an assessment of overall water quality in the region. For related materials see the Walter Lyon Papers (MG-472).


Bureau of Water Quality Management

SUBJECT FILES
1978-1980
10 cu. ft.
accession # 2662

unprocessed


Bureau of Soil and Water Conservation
Created in 1937 and was replaced by the State Soil Conservation Commission in the Dept. of Agriculture in 1945. In 1963, this became the State Soil and Water Conservation Commission and consisted of the Secretary of Agriculture, Secretary of Forests and Waters, Dean of the College of Agriculture at The Pennsylvania State University, and three farmers appointed to two-year terms by the Governor from six farmers nominated by the Pennsylvania State Council of Farm Organizations. The Act of 1945, as amended in 1963, provided for the establishment of soil and water conservation districts by resolution of the Board of County Commissioners of any county when it was determined that the erosion of soil resources had become a public concern in that county. The Bureau of Soil and Water Conservation that administered such districts was transferred from the Dept. of Agriculture to the Dept. of Environmental Resources under Act # 274 (P.L. 834) in 1970. For related types of materials see also Records of the Dept. of Agriculture (RG-1).


ANNUAL REPORTS OF CONSERVATION DISTRICTS,
1968-1989
(2 cartons)

{series #43.49}

Arranged alphabetically by county.

Annual reports prepared by county conservation districts on the status of efforts to prevent soil erosion and to control runoff into streams and rivers. Information provided includes the names of the persons preparing the report, narrative descriptions of the status documenting soil conservation measures, and statistical data on annual stream runoff levels.



Office of the Deputy Secretary for Resource Management

FLOOD CONTROL AND RECREATIONAL FACILTY RECORDS
1982
2 cu. ft.
accession #1872

unprocessed


Citizens Advisory Council

MINUTES AND TRANSCRIPTS OF MEETINGS
1971-1978
2 cu. ft.
accession # 1713

unprocessed



PA State Archives - Research Guides - Energy Related Records

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