Pennsylvania State Historical Markers Relating To The Underground Railroad, Abolition, And Slavery
Information current to November 2009
 
ADAMS COUNTY
 
Rev. Daniel Alexander Payne
Dedicated: Sunday, March 10, 1991
County: Adams; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Education, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -77.23333, LAT: 39.83448
Location: 239 N. Washington St. at Gettysburg College
Marker Text: Born a free African-American. He taught the Colored people at this college, 1837, while a student at the Lutheran Seminary. A historian, he was elected bishop of the A.M.E. Church, 1852, and was president of Wilberforce University, 1863-76.
 
Thaddeus Stevens
Dedicated: Wednesday, September 01, 1954
County: Adams; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Business & Industry, Education, Government & Politics, Iron
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -77.23276, LAT: 39.83097
Location: 51 Chambersburg St., Gettysburg
Marker Text: Lawyer, congressman, abolitionist, ironmaster, and defender of free public schools in Pennsylvania, lived in a house that stood on this site. He moved from here in 1842.
 
 
ALLEGHENY COUNTY
 
Avery College
Dedicated: Monday, January 01, 1968
County: Allegheny; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Education, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -79.9986, LAT: 40.45389
Location: 619 Ohio St., North Side, Pittsburgh
Marker Text: To the south, at Nash and Avery Streets, stood Avery College. Founded in 1849 by Charles Avery (1784-1858), Methodist lay preacher, philanthropist, abolitionist, to provide a classical education for Negroes.
 
Bethel AME Church
Dedicated: Sunday, September 24, 1995
County: Allegheny; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Civil Rights, Education, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -80.0005, LAT: 40.43716
Location: 405 1st Ave., at Smithfield St., Pittsburgh
Marker Text: Founded 1808 & known as the African Church. Chartered in 1818. Located nearby in early years, church was site of area's first school for colored children, 1831, & statewide civil rights convention, 1841. Congregation moved to Wylie Avenue, 1872; to Webster Avenue, 1959.
 
Bower Hill
Dedicated: Friday, August 23, 1996
County: Allegheny; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: American Revolution, George Washington, Mansions & Manors, Military, Whiskey Rebellion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -80.08614, LAT: 40.37434
Location: 292 Kane Blvd., Scott Twp., NE of Bridgeville
Marker Text: Site of Gen. John Neville's mansion, burned to the ground by insurgents during a major escalation of violence in the Whiskey Rebellion, July 16-17, 1794. Gen. Neville was Inspector of Revenue under President Washington. In the two-day battle, Neville with his slaves and a small federal detachment met a force of over 500 rebels. Two opposition leaders, Oliver Miller and James McFarlane, were killed.
 
Martin R. Delany
Dedicated: Saturday, May 11, 1991
County: Allegheny; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Civil War, Military, Professions & Vocations, Publishing
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -80.00325, LAT: 40.43948
Location: 5 PPG Place, 3rd Ave. & Market St., Pittsburgh
Marker Text: A promoter of African-American nationalism, Delany published a Black newspaper, The Mystery, at an office near here. He attended Harvard Medical School, practiced medicine in Pittsburgh, and was commissioned as a major in the Civil War.
 
 
BEDFORD COUNTY
 
Benjamin Walker
Dedicated: Saturday, May 13, 2006
County: Bedford; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Civil War, Underground Railroad
Location: 407 Rainbow Dr., Alum Bank, PA 15521, 1.5 mi. N of Pleasantville - Rt. 56 onto Beutman Rd., .5 mi. N to location
Marker Text: Before and during the Civil War, Benjamin Walker, Abner Walker, Sr. and George Harbaugh worked closely with African American Underground Railroad conductors John Fiddler, Elisa Rouse and Joseph Crawley. Hundreds of fugitive slaves were led from the PA border through Bedford County via the Walker Homestead, across the mountain and north to freedom. Participation in the UGRR was dangerous, due to the proximity to the MD border.
 
 
BERKS COUNTY
 
Bethel AME Church
Dedicated: Saturday, May 11, 1996
County: Berks; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Buildings, Religion, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.9256, LAT: 40.34255
Location: 119 N. 10th St., Reading
Marker Text: Berks County's oldest Black church building. Erected 1837 by free African Americans; became an Underground Railroad station for escaped slaves seeking freedom. Rebuilt 1867; remodeled 1889. Congregation, dating from 1822, moved to Windsor Street in 1974.
 
Thomas Rutter
Dedicated: Monday, October 04, 1982
County: Berks; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Business & Industry, Education, Iron, Mansions & Manors, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.70375, LAT: 40.281
Location: Pine Forge Academy off Pine Forge Rd. (SR 2063), Pine Forge
Marker Text: Pioneer ironmaster and opponent of slavery who died 1730. Built Pennsylvania’s first ironworks nearby, 1716. In ensuing decade he erected Pine Forge and built this mansion; in 19th century it was an Underground Railroad stop. Academy was founded here, 1945.
 
 
BLAIR COUNTY
 
Altoona Conference
Dedicated: Friday, May 28, 1948
County: Blair; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: Abraham Lincoln, African American, Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century
Location: U.S. 22 between Hollidaysburg and Duncansville (Missing)
Marker Text: On Sept. 24-26 , 1862, the loyal war governors of the Northern states met at the call of Governor Curtin of Pennsylvania in Altoona. Out of the meeting at the Logan House came new unity, support for Lincoln, and emancipation of the slaves.
 
Logan House
Dedicated: Tuesday, April 01, 1947
County: Blair; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: Abraham Lincoln, African American, Business & Industry, Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century, Governors, Inns
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -78.40168, LAT: 40.51502
Location: 11th Ave. at 13th St., Altoona
Marker Text: At the famous railroad hotel on this site was held the Conference of Northern War Governors, Sept. 24-26, 1862. Governor Andrew Curtin of Pennsylvania called the meeting which united forces behind Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation.
 
BRADFORD COUNTY
 
David Wilmot
Dedicated: Monday, May 12, 1947
County: Bradford; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century
Location: William St. at Riverside Cemetery, Towanda (Missing)
Marker Text: The great Free-Soiler is buried here. Born at Bethany, 1814. Studied law at Wilkes-Barre, 1834. Began practice in Towanda, his home until his death, 1868. His famed Wilmot Proviso introduced August 8, 1846.
 
 
CHESTER COUNTY
 
Ann Preston, MD
Dedicated: Saturday, March 22, 2008
County: Chester; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Medicine & Science, Religion, Underground Railroad, Women
Location: 225 State Rd., West Grove
Marker Text: A pioneer physician and educator, in 1860 Preston founded the Woman's Hospital of Philadelphia, where she later established one of the nation's first nurses' training schools. A graduate of the Female Medical College of Pennsylvania, she became its dean in 1865, the first American woman to hold such an office. She was a Quaker dedicated to women's rights and an abolitionist involved with the Underground Railroad. Preston was born here.
 
Frederick Douglass
Dedicated: Wednesday, February 01, 2006
County: Chester; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Civil Rights, Education, Government & Politics 19th Century, Military, Publishing
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.59732, LAT: 39.95235
Location: West Chester Univ. campus, between Library and Main Hall, facing High St.
Marker Text: Champion of human freedom, African American abolitionist, newspaper editor, U.S. Colored Troops recruiter, U.S. ambassador to Haiti, and orator, Frederick Douglass gave his last public address "Against Lynch Law" here on February 1, 1895. A frequent visitor to West Chester, Douglass denounced lynching and bigotry and urged freedom, justice, and equality for all Americans. The Frederick Douglass Institute here maintains Douglass' legacy.
 
Hosanna Meeting House
Dedicated: Saturday, May 09, 1992
County: Chester; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Houses & Homesteads, Religion, Underground Railroad
Location: Old U.S. 1 (Baltimore Pike) N of Lincoln University campus, Lower Oxford Twp.
Marker Text: Founded by free Blacks who had settled in this area, it was first known as the "African Meeting House." Formally organized in 1843 as an African Union Methodist Protestant church. A station stop on the Underground Railroad, its many visitors included Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth.
 
Star of the West (Tent #6)
Dedicated: Monday, May 15, 1995
County: Chester; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Women
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.59757, LAT: 39.96137
Location: 113 S Adams St., West Chester
Marker Text: An African American women's community service organization, chartered 1865. A part of the United Order of Tents, J. R. Giddings and Jollifee Union, founded in 1847 and named for abolitionist Congressman Giddings and his law partner.
 
Lincoln University
Dedicated: Wednesday, January 25, 1967
County: Chester; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Education
Location: SR 3026 (old U.S. 1), 2 miles NE of Oxford
Marker Text: Chartered as Ashmun Institute, April 29, 1854. Founded by Rev. John Miller Dickey for the purpose of providing liberal higher education for people of African ancestry in America. In 1866, it became Lincoln University, interracial and international.
 
 
CRAWFORD COUNTY
 
John Brown Tannery
Dedicated: Monday, November 18, 1946
County: Crawford; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -79.95073, LAT: 41.71892
Location: Twp. Road (former LR 20118), just S of Pa. 77, New Richmond
Marker Text: John Brown of Ossawatomie and Harper's Ferry worked here as a tanner, 1825-35. The nearby house was then his home. His first wife and son are buried near.
 
John Brown Tannery
Dedicated: 1969
County: Crawford; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Business & Industry, Houses & Homesteads, Underground Railroad
Location: PA 77 at New Richmond
Marker Text: On the side road, a short distance south, are the remains of the tannery and home built by the noted abolitionist of Harper's Ferry fame. Here, he lived and worked from 1825 to 1835, employing as many as 15 men in producing leather.
 
Richard Henderson
Dedicated: Sunday, June 01, 1980
County: Crawford; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -80.14845, LAT: 41.63608
Location: Liberty & Arch Sts., next to Bethel AME Church, Meadville
Marker Text: Born a slave in Maryland in 1801, he escaped as a boy and about 1824 came to Meadville. A barber, he was long active in the Underground Railroad. His Arch Street house, since torn down, is estimated to have harbored some 500 runaway slaves prior to the Civil War.
 
 
CUMBERLAND COUNTY
 
Bethel AME Church
Dedicated May 9, 2009
County: Cumberland; Marker Type: City
Location: Carlisle, 131 Pomfret Street
Marker Text: Among the earliest (c. 1820) African American congregations located west of the Susquehanna River. The site of Under-
ground Railroad activity. Abolitionists John Peck and John B. Vashon were members. A.M.E. national Bishops Daniel Payne and Wills Nazrey were asso-ciated with the church.
 
 
Daniel Kaufman
Dedicated: Saturday, May 25, 2002
County: Cumberland; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Early Settlement, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -77.12717, LAT: 40.1384
Location: 301 Front Street, Boiling Springs
Marker Text: An Underground Railroad agent from 1835 to 1847, when he was sued by a Maryland slave owner. He was ultimately fined $4,000 in 1852, in a case that drew wide attention. Kaufman had provided food and transportation to fugitive slaves passing through this area; his barn and a densely wooded area nearby furnished shelter. In 1845, Kaufman laid out the village of Boiling Springs, and he built his 301 Front Street home in 1880.
 
Locust Grove Cemetery
Dedicated: Monday, May 28, 2007
County: Cumberland; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Civil War, Military
Location: 100 block of N Queen St., Shippensburg
Marker Text: Burial ground for slaves and free blacks since the early 19th century and site of Shippensburg's first African American church, established 1830s. Edward Shippen Burd granted the land to Shippensburg’s African American community in 1842. It was the only public cemetery open to African Americans in the area until the late 20th century. Graves of veterans from the Civil War to the Vietnam conflict include those of twenty-six Civil War soldiers.
 
 
DAUPHIN COUNTY
 
Lincoln Cemetery
Dedicated: Tuesday, June 21, 1994
County: Dauphin; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Civil War, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.8447, LAT: 40.28
Location: 30th Street & Booser Ave., Penbrook
Marker Text: A landmark of central Pennsylvania's African American history. Established in 1827 by Wesley Union A.M.E. Zion Church. Among those buried here are T. Morris Chester, William Howard Day, Catherine McClintock, and at least 20 veterans of the Civil War.
 
T. Morris Chester
Dedicated: Wednesday, December 03, 1986
County: Dauphin; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Civil War, Education, Military, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.8812, LAT: 40.2607
Location: Market Street near 3rd St., Harrisburg
Marker Text: Journalist, educator, lawyer. Born here, 1834. Taught in Liberia, 1857-61. Recruited Black soldiers in Civil War; noted as war correspondent. In Europe for freedmen's aid; was admitted to the English bar in 1870. Held major posts in Louisiana, 1873-83. Died nearby, 1892.
 
US Grand Review of Colored Troops
Dedicated: Saturday, May 06, 2006
County: Dauphin; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Civil War, Military
Location: Soldier's Grove behind Capitol, Walnut / 7th St. across from State St. Bridge, Harrisburg
Marker Text: Excluded from a May 1865 "Grand Review of the Armies" in Wash., DC, U.S. Colored Troops from Penna. and Mass. regiments assembled here at State & Filbert Sts. on Nov. 14, 1865 for a parade honoring their courage during the Civil War. Grand Marshal T. Morris Chester led them through Harrisburg to Sen. Simon Cameron’s Front St. home to be gratefully acknowledged. Octavius Catto, William Howard Day, Gen. JB Kiddoo, & the Rev. Stephen Smith spoke.
 
Tanner’s Alley
Dedicated: Saturday, April 29, 2000
County: Dauphin; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Religion, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.8815, LAT: 40.2628
Location: In Capitol Park, Walnut St. near Commonwealth Ave., Harrisburg
Marker Text: In the 1850s this area, known as Tanner''s Alley, was important on the Underground Railroad. Fugitive slaves hid at Joseph Bustill’s & William Jones’ houses, a block apart. Frederick Douglass & William Lloyd Garrison spoke at Wesley Union AME Zion Church nearby.
 
William Howard Day
Dedicated: Monday, May 26, 1997
County: Dauphin; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Education, Professions & Vocations, Religion, Underground Railroad, Writers
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.8383, LAT: 40.2432
Location: Lincoln & Carlisle Sts., Steelton
Marker Text: Abolitionist, minister, orator, editor, educator. Born in New York City; traveled in the U.S., Canada, and Britain on behalf of antislavery and free Blacks. General Secretary, A.M.E. Zion Church. Lived after 1870 in Harrisburg, where he edited the newspaper Our National Progress. The first African American elected to the Harrisburg School Board, in 1878; its president, 1891-93. Burial in Lincoln Cemetery.
 
 
DELAWARE COUNTY
 
Abraham L. Pennock
Dedicated: Thursday, October 24, 1985
County: Delaware; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century, Underground Railroad, Women
Location: At library on Maple Avenue between Wayne and Hazel, off S. State Rd. (SR 2026), Upper Darby
Marker Text: This prominent abolitionist and patron of the arts resided here at Hoodland until his death in 1868. The home had been built in 1823 by his father-in-law, John Sellers II. A leader in the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society, Abraham Pennock also was an advocate of woman suffrage, and active in the temperance movement. Notable visitors to his home included John Greenleaf Whittier and James Russell Lowell.
 
Fanny M. Jackson Coppin
Dedicated: Wednesday, February 12, 1986
County: Delaware; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Education, Professions & Vocations, Religion, Women, Writers
Location: Cheyney University campus, off Dilworthtown & Cheyney Rds., Cheyney
Marker Text: Educator, writer, humanist, missionary. A former slave, she graduated from Oberlin College in 1865. Principal, Institute for Colored Youth, 1869-1902 (I.C.Y. became Cheyney University, 1983). Coppin pioneered industrial arts and teacher education.
 
Thomas Garrett
Dedicated: Sunday, October 25, 1981
County: Delaware; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Religion, Underground Railroad
Location: Garrett Rd. & Maple Ave., Drexel Hill
Marker Text: Born at Riverview, near here, Garrett was a prominent abolitionist and Underground Railroad activist. He moved to Wilmington, DE in 1822, and sent many fugitive slaves to his brothers at Riverview, Fernland Farms, and here at Thornfield. He was a devout Quaker and associate of Harriet Tubman and William Still. Although convicted and fined, he aided 2,700 freedom seekers; his commitment to their emancipation was unwavering.
 
 
ERIE COUNTY
 
African Americans in the Battle of Lake Erie
Dedicated: Tuesday, September 10, 1996
County: Erie; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Military, War of 1812
Location: Erie Maritime Museum, 150 E. Front St., Erie
Marker Text: These skilled crewmen were among those who enabled Oliver Hazard Perry to defeat and capture a British squadron, Sept. 10,1813. Their participation--critical to victory--secured a place for African Americans in the region's history.
 
 
FRANKLIN COUNTY
 
Caledonia Furnace
Dedicated: Monday, August 25, 1947
County: Franklin; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: Business & Industry, Civil War, Furnaces, Military
Location: US 30 & PA 233, Caledonia State Park, east end of Fayetteville
Marker Text: Erected in 1837 by Thaddeus Stevens and James D. Paxton. Stevens' antislavery stand led to its destruction by Gen. Jubal Early,
June 26, 1863, on his way to York during the early Gettysburg campaign.
 
The 54 th Mass. Infantry Regiment , US Colored Troops
Dedicated: Saturday, November 7, 2009
County: Franklin; Marker Type: Roadside 
Categories: African American, Civil War
In 1863, the 54 th Massachusetts Regiment was among the first Civil War combat units open to African Americans. Troops from Pennsylvania made up more than 20 percent of the acclaimed unit. Mercersburg was second only to Philadelphia in mustering volunteers from the Commonwealth. The valor shown by the regiment improved regard for Black soldiers and helped spur recruiting. Of 38 USCT Civil War veterans buried here, 13 served in the 54 th Mass.
 
Frederick Douglass and John Brown
Dedicated: Sunday, August 21, 1994
County: Franklin; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Government & Politics 19th Century, Military
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.3333, LAT: 39.935
Location: West Washington St., behind Southgate Mall, Chambersburg
Marker Text: The two abolitionists met at a stone quarry here, Aug. 19-21, 1859, and discussed Brown's plans to raid the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry. He urged Douglass to join an armed demonstration against slavery. Douglass refused, warning the raid would fail; the Oct. 16, 1859 attack confirmed his fears. Brown was captured with his surviving followers and was executed Dec. 2, 1859.
 
John Brown
Dedicated: N/A
County: Franklin; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Government & Politics 19th Century, Military
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -77.65831, LAT: 39.93881
Location: 225 E. King St., Chambersburg
Marker Text: Boarded in this house for a while in the summer of 1859 under the name of "Smith." While in Chambersburg, he secretly received firearms and ammunition. Later in 1859, Brown led a raid on the arsenal at Harper's Ferry.
 
John Brown Raid
Dedicated: Wednesday, June 11, 1947
County: Franklin; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Government & Politics 19th Century, Military
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.4553, LAT: 39.8404
Location: PA 233, 1 mile E of Mont Alto, across from PSU campus
Marker Text: Captain John Cooke, one of Brown's followers, was captured near here on Oct. 25, 1859, nine days after the raid on Harper's Ferry. He was hanged December 16, two weeks after John Brown.
 
Joseph Winters
Dedicated: Monday, May 23, 2005
County: Franklin; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Entrepreneurs, Invention, Native American, Police and Safety, Underground Railroad
Location: Junior Hose and Truck Company #2, 130 N Second St., Chambersburg
Marker Text: African American inventor who secured a U.S. patent for the first fire escape ladder and hose conductor in 1878. In 1879 Winters was issued a second U.S. patent for improvements to the original invention. Winters was active in the Underground Railroad. He resided in Chambersburg.
 
Martin Delany
Dedicated: Saturday, October 25, 2003
County: Franklin; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Civil Rights, Military, Professions & Vocations, Publishing, Underground Railroad
Location: 566 S. Main St., Chambersburg
Marker Text: Delany was an influential abolitionist, civil rights activist, Army officer, and prominent physician. The son of an enslaved father and free mother received his education in Chambersburg. He went on to publish an anti-slavery newspaper, “The Mystery.” He worked along with Frederick Douglass to champion freedom and later became the first commissioned African American officer in the United States Army.
 
Underground Railroad Activity in Chambersburg
Dedicated: Wednesday, January 15, 2003
County: Franklin; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Underground Railroad
Location: Main St. & Lincoln Hwy. (Rt. 30), on NE quadrant of the "diamond," Chambersburg
Marker Text: Throughout the pre-Civil War period, there were a number of Underground Railroad "stations" in this area, temporary places of refuge for former slaves escaping through the mountainous terrain to freedom in the North. One local Underground Railroad agent was a free black barber, Henry Watson, who assisted fugitive slaves as they passed through Chambersburg, helping to keep them safe and undetected by the slave-catchers and bounty hunters searching for them.
 
 
INDIANA COUNTY
 
Absalom (Albert) Hazlett
Dedicated: Friday, March 27, 2009
County: Indiana; Marker Type: Roadside
Location: S 6th St. extension (near PA Barbeque), Indiana
Marker Text: A staunch abolitionist, Hazlett became a lieutenant in John Brown’s provisional army and participated in the raid on Harper’s Ferry Arsenal in 1859. He was captured, tried, convicted, and hanged for his involvement following the failed Harper’s Ferry attack. This incident, intended to arm slaves to fight for their own freedom, was a major catalyst for the outbreak of the Civil War. Hazlett was born and raised near here.
 
Fugitive Slave Rescue
Dedicated: Saturday, April 17, 2004
County: Indiana; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Government & Politics 19th Century, Underground Railroad
Location: Market St. at Liberty St., Blairsville
Marker Text: In April, 1858, citizens of Blairsville rescued a fugitive slave, Newton, from arrest by a U.S. Marshall and Virginia slave hunters. Lewis Johnson, a local black abolitionist and conductor on the Underground Railroad, housed Newton. Indiana County was an important UGRR stop.
 
Dr. Robert Mitchell
Dedicated: Wednesday, October 17, 2007
County: Indiana; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Underground Railroad
Location: Adams St. (Rt. 286), Clymer, just over Cherry Hill Twp. border
Marker Text: Outspoken opponent of slavery, Mitchell was widely known as an abolitionist. In September 1845, he harbored five fugitives from slavery on his property here. Following a raid by bounty hunters, two men escaped; three were returned to slavery. Mitchell was tried and convicted for violating the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793, and suffered heavy financial losses. The incident contributed to the more restrictive Fugitive Slave Act of 1850.
 
Rescue of Anthony Hollingsworth
Dedicated: Friday, September 27, 2002
County: Indiana; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Underground Railroad
Location: 6th & Philadelphia Streets, Indiana
Marker Text: On June 26, 1845, this 12 year - old fugitive slave was captured by slave hunters. Armed residents surrounded the hotel where he was held & demanded his release, defying federal law. Judge Thomas White freed him in the old courthouse on this site.
 
 
JEFFERSON COUNTY
 
Elijah Heath
Dedicated: Wednesday, August 31, 2005
County: Jefferson; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -79.0798, LAT: 41.15965
Location: 64 S. Pickering St., Brookville
Marker Text: Outspoken abolitionist and judge, in 1835 Heath & others rescued two fugitive slaves, Charles Brown & William Parker. Heath, a Brookville resident, was sued by a Virginia slaveholder and fined for his actions. Undeterred, Heath continued his Underground Railroad activities.
 
 
LACKAWANNA COUNTY
 
Hickory Grove Cemetery
Dedicated: Saturday, May 03, 2003
County: Lackawanna; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.69275, LAT: 41.52546
Location: 273 Miller Rd., just south of Carbondale Road (Rt. 632), Waverly
Marker Text: One of the oldest known cemeteries associated with African Americans in Northeastern PA. Established in 1807 in Waverly, then known as Abington Center, the cemetery is the burial ground for many fugitives from slavery who came to the area via the Underground Railroad in the mid-19th century. By the end of the 19th century there were 75 former slaves in Waverly. This cemetery is evidence of the former African American community here.
 
 
LANCASTER COUNTY
 
The Christiana Riot
Dedicated: Saturday, April 25, 1998
County: Lancaster; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.0122, LAT: 39.93633
Location: Lower Valley Rd. near Orchard Buck Rd., Sadsbury Twp., SW of Christiana
Marker Text: The 1850 federal Fugitive Slave Act strengthened the position of slave owners seeking to capture runaways. Pursuing four escaped slaves, Maryland farmer Edward Gorsuch arrived Sept. 11, 1851, at the Christiana home of William Parker, an African American who was giving them refuge. Neighbors gathered, fighting ensued, and Gorsuch was killed. This incident did much to polarize the national debate over the slavery issue.
 
Thaddeus Stevens
Dedicated: Friday, March 24, 1950
County: Lancaster; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Business & Industry, Education, Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century, Professions & Vocations
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.311, LAT: 40.04055
Location: W. Chestnut St. at Shreiner''s Cemetery, near N Mulberry St., Lancaster
Marker Text: Lawyer, congressman, defender of free public schools, abolitionist, lies buried in the rear of this cemetery. He believed in the "Equality of man before his Creator." Resided in Lancaster from 1842 until his death, 1868.
 
 
LUZERNE COUNTY
 
William Camp Gildersleeve
Dedicated: Saturday, October 16, 2004
County: Luzerne; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Government & Politics 19th Century, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.89007, LAT: 41.2406
Location: 20 East Ross St., Wilkes-Barre
Marker Text: Prominent merchant and ardent abolitionist significant to the Underground Railroad in Wilkes-Barre. He provided refuge to fugitive slaves at his home and business near here. In 1853, Gildersleeve testified in a U.S. Supreme Court case, Maxwell vs. Righter, in which a fugitive, William Thomas, was shot and wounded by deputy U.S. marshals. The case and his testimony received national attention, especially in African American newspapers.
 
Freedom Road Cemetery
Dedicated: Saturday, May 15, 1993
County: Lycoming; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Civil War, Religion, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -77.0102, LAT: 41.2622
Location: T-456 in Loyalsock Twp.
Marker Text: Daniel Hughes, a lumber raftsman on the Susquehanna, lived here, 1854-80. In the years ending with the Civil War, he brought fugitive slaves here from Maryland, protecting them before they continued north via the Underground Railroad. Hughes gave part of his land for a cemetery, and among those buried here are nine known African-American veterans of the Civil War. The cemetery has borne its present name since 1936.
 
 
MERCER COUNTY
 
Freedom Road
Dedicated: Monday, August 23, 1948
County: Mercer; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Underground Railroad, Women
GPS Coordinates: LNG: 80.09734, LAT: 41.33535
Location: US 62, across from Great Stoneboro Fair, SW of Sandy Lake
Marker Text: In search of freedom, men and women brought from the South by the "Underground Railroad" settled near here about 1825 and later. After 1850, most of them went on to Canada. Their cemetery, still in use, lies a short distance above the road.
 
MONTGOMERY COUNTY
 
Abolition Hall
Dedicated: Saturday, November 18, 2000
County: Montgomery; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Buildings, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.27813, LAT: 40.10303
Location: 4006 Butler Pike, Plymouth Meeting
Marker Text: The Antislavery meeting hall here, opened in 1856, brought many leading abolitionists speakers as guests of George Corson and his wife, Martha Maulsby Corson. Built over a carriage shed, the hall could accommodate up to 200 visitors. The family's 1767 homestead here had already long been a station on the Underground Railroad. Later, 1881-1895, Abolition Hall was the studio of son-in-law Thomas Hovenden, who painted "Last Moments of John Brown."
 
Camp William Penn
Dedicated: Saturday, May 15, 1999
County: Montgomery; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Civil War, Military
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.1423, LAT: 40.06635
Location: 7322 Sycamore Ave., LaMott
Marker Text: Here was Pennsylvania's only training camp for African American soldiers -- and the largest of the 18 in the nation -- during the Civil War. Comprising over 10,000 men, 11 regiments of U.S. Colored Troops were trained here: the 3rd, 6th, 8th, 22nd, 24th, 25th, 32nd, 41st, 43rd, 45th & 127th. Recruits first arrived on June 26, 1863; many were to fight in Virginia, South Carolina, Florida & elsewhere. The camp closed August 14, 1865.
 
Lucretia C. Mott
Dedicated: Wednesday, May 01, 1974
County: Montgomery; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: Civil Rights, Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century, Religion, Underground Railroad, Women
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.13548, LAT: 40.06442
Location: Pa. 611 N of Cheltenham Ave., Elkins Park
Marker Text: Nearby stood "Roadside," the home of the ardent Quakeress, Lucretia C. Mott (1793-1880). Her most notable work was in connection with antislavery, women's rights, temperance and peace.
 
Plymouth Friends Meeting House
Dedicated: Sunday, May 15, 1955
County: Montgomery; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: American Revolution, Buildings, George Washington, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.27882, LAT: 40.10272
Location: Germantown Pike (old U.S. 422) & Butler Pike at Plymouth Meeting
Marker Text: In continuous use as a house of worship since about 1708, it served as a hospital and campsite for Washington's forces on way to Valley Forge. Eastern wing, added in 1780, replaced original log school. Site was a center of activity during Abolition Movement.
 
Village of LaMott
Dedicated: June, 1973
County: Montgomery; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Cities & Towns, Civil War, Military, William Penn
Location: PA 309 (Cheltenham Ave.) just NW of Pa. 611
Marker Text: Originally called Camptown, this village was laid out at the close of the Civil War on the site of former Camp William Penn. The camp was a training station for Negro troops enlisted in the U. S. Army from 1863 to 1865.
 
PHILADELPHIA COUNTY
 
AME Book Concern
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: 75.15304, LAT: 39.94426
Location: 631 Pine St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Here in 1836 a church related company began printing hymnals, religious materials, and works by Black authors of the period. In 1847 The Christian Recorder was published here. Bishop Benjamin Tucker Tanner was editor of the firm until 1884.
 
African Zoar Methodist Episcopal Church
Dedicated: Saturday, June 02, 1990
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Religion, Underground Railroad
Location: 4th & Brown Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Founded here in 1794 by 15 men and three women from St. George's Church, led by Rev. Harry Hosier. Zoar was active in the Underground Railroad and moved to 12th and Melon Streets in 1883. It is United Methodism's oldest Black congregation.
 
Cyrus Bustill
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Education, Native American, Professions & Vocations
Location: 210 Arch St., Philadelphia (Missing)
Marker Text: Born of White, Black, and Native American descent, he bought his freedom and became a baker of bread for Revolutionary troops. A founder of the Free African Society, he later opened a school for Black children while living here.
 
David Bustill Bowser
Dedicated: 1991
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Artists
Location: 841 N. 4th St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: A self-taught Black artist, Bowser, who lived here, began his career as a landscape, sign emblem, and banner painter. He also painted portraits including several of Lincoln and one of abolitionist John Brown.
 
First African Baptist Church
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.16533, LAT: 39.93767
Location: 16th & Christian Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Founded 1809 as one of the first Black Baptist churches in America. Later two members sold themselves into slavery to free a slave to serve as pastor. Erected 1906, this building is located at a later site of the congregation.
 
First African Baptist Church Cemetery
Dedicated: 1992
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Religion
Location: 8th & Vine Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Site of the cemetery that served this congregation from 1824-1842. Archaeological excavations in the 1980s provided links to ancient African burial customs. The remains were re-interred in Eden Cemetery, Delaware Co., Pa
 
First African Presbyterian Church
Dedicated: 1993
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Religion
Location: 42nd & Girard Ave., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Founded 1807 by John Gloucester, a former slave who was instrumental in establishing Presbyterianism among African-Americans. First edifice was dedicated 1811 at 7th & Bainbridge Streets. Church has been at this location since 1957.
 
First Protest Against Slavery
Dedicated: Saturday, September 08, 1990
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Ethnic & Immigration, Government & Politics, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: 75.16496, LAT: 40.03003
Location: 5109 Germantown Ave. at Wister St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Here in 1688, at the home of Tunes Kunders, an eloquent protest was written by a group of German Quakers. Signed by Pastorius and three others, it preceded by 92 years Pennsylvania's passage of the nation's first state abolition law.
 
Frances E. W. Harper
Dedicated: Wednesday, March 25, 1992
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Civil Rights, Education, Underground Railroad, Women, Writers
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.15938, LAT: 39.942
Location: 1006 Bainbridge St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: An author, lecturer, and social activist, Harper lived here and devoted her life to championing the rights of slaves and free Blacks. She advocated education as a way of advancement for Black Americans.
 
Free African Society
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Government & Politics
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.15195, LAT: 39.94325
Location: 6th & Lombard Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Established in 1787 under the leadership of Richard Allen and Absolom Jones, this organization fostered identity, leadership, and unity among Blacks and became the forerunner of the first African-American churches in this city.
 
The Grand United Order of Odd Fellows
Dedicated: 1992
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Medicine & Science
Location: 12th & Spruce Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Founded in 1844, this was the first Black lodge in Pennsylvania and the third in the United States. A benevolent fraternity, it provided funds for sick and disabled members. In 1908 the national headquarters were erected here.
 
Institute for Colored Youth
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Agriculture, Education, Labor
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.15753, LAT: 39.94177
Location: 915 Bainbridge Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Begun as a farm school. In 1852 it became one of the first schools to train Blacks for skilled trades and teaching. It gained recognition here under Fanny J. Coppin, principal, 1869-1902. Relocated, it later became Cheyney University.
 
James Forten
Dedicated: Tuesday, April 24, 1990
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.14858, LAT: 39.94262
Location: 336 Lombard St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: A wealthy sailmaker who employed multi-racial craftsmen, Forten was a leader of the African-American community in Philadelphia and a champion of reform causes. The American Antislavery Society was organized in his house here in 1833.
 
Johnson House
Dedicated: Thursday, June 01, 1995
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Houses & Homesteads, Religion, Underground Railroad
Location: 6306 Germantown Ave., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Built in 1768 for John Johnson. This was home to three generations of a Quaker family who worked to abolish slavery and improve living conditions for freed African Americans. In the 1850s this house was a station on the Underground Railroad. Here and in smaller buildings on the property, men and women escaping slavery found shelter in their way to freedom.
 
Joseph and Amy Cassey
Dedicated: Friday March 13, 2009
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Underground Railroad
Location: 4th St., between Chestnut St. & Ranstead Ct. Alley, Philadelphia
Marker Text: African American abolitionists who associated with prominent abolitionists such as Wm. Lloyd Garrison and James Forten. Jos. Cassey was distributor for Garrison's newspaper The Liberator . They also supported education and women's rights and were members of several benevolent organizations. 
 
The Liberation of Jane Johnson
Dedicated: Saturday July 18, 2009
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Government & Politics 19 th Century, Women
Location: Penn’s Landing near Walnut St. pedestrian walkway and entrance to Independence Seaport Museum
Marker Text: In 1855, an enslaved woman and her two sons found freedom, aided by abolitionists William Still, Passmore Williamson, and other Underground Railroad activists. They escaped from their Southern owner while being transported through Philadelphia and settled later in Boston. The incident, which occurred nearby, and Williamson’s subsequent imprisonment and famous trial attracted national attention, further intensifying the North-South conflict.  
 
Lombard Street Riot
Dedicated: Wednesday, November 23, 2005
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.15197, LAT: 39.94298
Location: SE corner of 6th & Lombard Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Here on August 1, 1842 an angry mob of whites attacked a parade celebrating Jamaican Emancipation Day. A riot ensued. African Americans were beaten and their homes looted. The rioting lasted for 3 days. A local church & abolition meeting place were destroyed by fire.
 
Mother Bethel AME Church
Dedicated: Tuesday, March 19, 1991
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Religion, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.15198, LAT: 39.94298
Location: 6th & Lombard Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Founded on ground purchased by Richard Allen in 1787, this congregation is the mother church of the African Methodist Episcopal denomination. The present structure, erected 1889, replaces three earlier churches on this site.
 
Octavius Catto
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Civil Rights, Civil War, Education, Government & Politics, Military
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.15593, LAT: 39.9425
Location: 812 South St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: An early graduate of the Institute for Colored Youth, Catto, who lived here, was an educator, a Union army major, and a political organizer. In 1871 he was assassinated by street rioters while urging African-Americans to vote. His death was widely mourned locally.
 
Pennsylvania Abolition Society
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Education, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.14253, LAT: 39.94743
Location: Front St. below Chestnut St, Philadelphia
Marker Text: Founded here, 1775, as the Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage. In 1787 it became the Pennsylvania Abolition Society which sought social, educational, and employment opportunities for Blacks.
 
Pennsylvania Hall
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.1498, LAT: 39.9538
Location: 6th & Haines Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Built on this site in 1838 by the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society as a meeting place for abolitionists, this hall was burned to the ground by anti-Black rioters three days after it was first opened.
 
Pennsylvania Female Anti-Slavery Society
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Government & Politics, Underground Railroad, Women
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.148367, LAT: 39.95275
Location: 5th & Arch Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Organized in 1833 by Quaker abolitionist Lucretia Mott, this society, headquartered here, originally consisted of sixty women who sought to end slavery. After the Civil War, the society supported the cause of the freed slaves.
 
Prince Hall Grand Lodge
Dedicated: Saturday, September 08, 1990
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.1489, LAT: 40.01908
Location: 4301 N. Broad St. (Pa. 611), between St. Luke & Bristol, Philadelphia
Marker Text: This Masonic lodge was named after Rev. Prince Hall, founder of Freemasonry among Africans. The first Grand Master of African Masonry was Absalom Jones, organizer in 1797 of Philadelphia's first lodge, the African Lodge of Free Masons.
 
Rev. Jehu Jones, Jr.
Dedicated: Sunday, February 22, 1998
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Religion
Location: 310 S. Quince St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: First African American Lutheran pastor in the U.S. Founder of nation's first African American Lutheran congregation, St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church. It built its first brick edifice here in 1834; worshiped at this site, with Jones as its pastor, until 1839.
 
Robert Bogle
Dedicated: 1991
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Professions & Vocations
Location: 8th & Bainbridge Sts., Philadelphia
Marker Text: A noted Black caterer, Bogle opened a posh eatery at this location in 1813. Recognized for his popular meat pies, he was well known as a master of ceremonies at elaborate weddings, funerals, and banquets for his wealthy clients.
 
Robert Mara Ager
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.15634, LAT: 39.94253
Location: 823 South St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Businessman, activist, bibliophile lived here. Director, Philadelphia Building & Loan Assn., pioneering Black firm. Amassed and donated a major collection of rare books, pamphlets on Blacks, antislavery. Founded Afro-American Historical Society.
 
Robert Purvis
Dedicated: Friday, February 21, 1992
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Civil Rights, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad, Writers
Location: 1601 Mt. Vernon St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: An abolitionist, Purvis fought for the rights of Blacks through his lecturing, writing, and activity in antislavery societies. As an agent for the Underground Railroad, he built a secret area here at his house to hide slaves.
 
St. Thomas ’ African Episcopal Church
Dedicated: Sunday, September 30, 1984
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Buildings, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.14995, LAT: 39.9465
Location: 5th St. S of St. James Pl., Philadelphia
Marker Text: Organized in 1792 as an outgrowth of the Free African Society, formed 1787. The original church edifice stood here. Under the ministry of the Rev. Absalom Jones (1746-1818), a former slave, this became the nation's first Black Episcopal church.
 
Stephen Smith
Dedicated: Wednesday, June 19, 1991
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Business & Industry, Coal, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
Location: 1050 Belmont Ave., Philadelphia
Marker Text: An abolitionist, Smith bought his freedom and was one of America's wealthiest Blacks with his coal, lumber, and real estate ventures. He was the major benefactor of the Stephen Smith Home for the Aged, located here.
 
Tindley Temple
Dedicated: N/A
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Buildings, Religion
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.16607, LAT: 39.94137
Location: 762 S. Broad St. (PA 611), Philadelphia
Marker Text: Founded 1902 as East Calvary Methodist Church. Renamed for its founder, Rev. Charles A. Tindley. Born a slave in Maryland, he did much to assist later migrants from the South. After his death, Tindley Temple continued to sponsor needed community programs.
 
William Still
Dedicated: Wednesday, July 03, 1991
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Coal, Underground Railroad
Location: 244 S 12th St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: While living here, he was an Underground Railroad agent who helped slaves escape and kept records so relatives could find them later. A wealthy coal merchant, Still also helped found the first Black YMCA.
 
William Whipper
Dedicated: Sunday, June 28, 1992
County: Philadelphia; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Business & Industry, Underground Railroad, Writers
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.15753, LAT: 39.94373
Location: 919 Lombard St., Philadelphia
Marker Text: A founder, American Moral Reform Society, he edited its journal, 1838-39. Active in the Underground Railroad, he aided hundreds of slaves passing through Columbia, Pa., 1847-60. Conducted lumber business in Columbia & this city. Later lived here.
 
 
SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY
 
Jonathan Jasper Wright
Dedicated: Thursday, September 13, 2001
County: Susquehanna; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Government & Politics 19th Century, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
Location: Rte 29 & Springville Township( Rte designated "Cemetery Street"), Springville
Marker Text: Jurist, educator, politician. The son of runaway slaves, Wright became the first black lawyer in Pennsylvania. He supported Frederick Douglass in advocating suffrage and legal equality for blacks. During Reconstruction in 1870, he was appointed South Carolina State Supreme Court justice, the first African American United States Appellate Judge. Wright's boyhood home was here in Springville.
 
Susquehanna County
Dedicated: Monday, July 05, 1982
County: Susquehanna; Marker Type: City
Categories: Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century, Underground Railroad
Location: Monument Square adjacent to County Courthouse, Montrose
Marker Text: Formed on February 21, 1810 out of Luzerne County. Named for Susquehanna River. Home of Galusha A. Grow, sponsor of 1862 Homestead Act. Montrose, county seat incorporated 1824, was an early Abolitionist center and stop on the Underground Railroad.
 
 
UNION COUNTY
 
Underground Railroad
Dedicated: Monday, November 22, 1954
County: Union; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Underground Railroad
Location: University Ave., Lewisburg
Marker Text: This old stable was a station on the Underground Railroad. Here fugitive slaves were hidden, fed, and aided in reaching the next station on their journey.
 
 
WASHINGTON COUNTY
 
LeMoyne House
Dedicated: Saturday, August 01, 1953
County: Washington; Marker Type: City
Categories: Buildings, Houses & Homesteads, Medicine & Science, Professions & Vocations
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -80.24327, LAT: 40.16798
Location: 49 E. Maiden St., Washington
Marker Text: Built, 1812, by Dr. John LeMoyne. For many years, home of his son Dr. Francis LeMoyne, noted abolitionist, and builder of first crematory in U.S. Now the home of the Washington County Historical Society.
 
 
WAYNE COUNTY
 
David Wilmot
Dedicated: Tuesday, July 27, 1948
County: Wayne; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: Government & Politics, Government & Politics 19th Century, Writers
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -75.28388, LAT: 41.61265
Location: PA 670 1.6 mi. NW of PA 90, Honesdale (Missing)
Marker Text: The great Free-Soiler and author of the 1846 Proviso was born at nearby Bethany Jan. 20, 1814. The birthplace is still standing. Later lived at Towanda and was buried there at Riverside Cemetery after his death March 16, 1868.
 
 
YORK COUNTY
 
Amanda Berry Smith
Dedicated: Saturday, October 02, 1993
County: York; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: African American, Education, Music & Theater, Publishing, Religion, Women
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.67964, LAT: 39.76704
Location: 108 S. Main St., Grace U.M. Church, Shrewsbury
Marker Text: A renowned evangelist and singer, born a slave in Maryland. Her father bought the family's freedom, and they moved to a farm near here. While still a child she was converted at this church. She committed her life to missionary work and traveled in the U.S. and to Britain, India, and Africa. Published a monthly paper, "The Helper." Founder and superintendent, Industrial Home for Colored Children in Illinois.
 
Mason-Dixon Line
Dedicated: Wednesday, May 27, 1970
County: York; Marker Type: Roadside
Categories: Early Settlement, Government & Politics 18th Century
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.91578, LAT: 39.72042
Location: Rt. 94 at state line
Marker Text: The historic boundary between Pennsylvania and Maryland was surveyed, 1763-1767, by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon to settle border disputes between the two Provinces. This section of the Mason-Dixon Line was surveyed in July, 1765.
 
William C. Goodridge
Dedicated: Thursday, December 17, 1987
County: York; Marker Type: City
Categories: African American, Business & Industry, Professions & Vocations, Underground Railroad
GPS Coordinates: LNG: -76.72583, LAT: 39.96458
Location: 123 E. Philadelphia St. (PA 74 & 462), York
Marker Text: Here lived an ex-slave, born 1805, who became a prominent York businessman, 1824-1863. Tanner, newspaper distributor, barber. Erected York's first five-story building. His 13 rail cars operated commercially and were used in his work for the Underground Railroad. 

For more information, please visit PHMC's Pennsylvania Historical Marker Program page or E-mail kgalle@pa.gov