Employer's Reference Guide to Unemployment Compensation

The information in this guide is designed to inform employers of their rights and responsibilities under the Pennsylvania Unemployment Compensation Law. Statements in this guide are intended for general information only and every effort has been made to be accurate. However, the statements contained are not to be construed as legal interpretations of the Law or of the Unemployment Compensation Regulations.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

    The Penalty for Not Submitting Requested Registration Reports
    The Employee's Contribution
    The Employer's Contribution
RATES
    How Employers are Notified of Their Rate Each Year
    Rates Assigned to New Employers
    When Standard Rates are Assigned
    Experience Rates
    Solvency Trigger
    Delinquent Employers
    How to Appeal Tax Rates
    Debit Reserve Account Balance Adjustment
    Voluntary Contributions
EMPLOYER AUDITS
ASSISTANCE AND INFORMATION
    Discrimination Prohibited
APPENDIX A — Unemployment Compensation Services Centers
APPENDIX B — Office of Unemployment Compensation Benefits
APPENDIX C — Additional Contacts
APPENDIX D — Reserve Ratio Factor Table
APPENDIX E — Summary of Solvency Trigger Determination 2008 through 2012
APPENDIX F — Taxable Wage Base

FREQUENTLY ASKED UC QUESTIONS

What is unemployment compensation?

Unemployment compensation (UC) is a type of income support. It provides income to individuals who lose their jobs through no fault of their own. If qualified, claimants will receive money for a limited time to help meet expenses while looking for another job. To be covered by the UC program, a claimant must be a worker who performed services covered by the Pennsylvania (PA) UC Law and have worked for an employer that is covered by the UC Law. Under certain conditions, claimants may have also paid into the UC Fund by payroll deductions. To safeguard these funds, all applications for benefits are checked thoroughly. Fraud is prosecuted and may result in fines and/or imprisonment or other penalties. To protect themselves, claimants and employers must give complete, accurate and factual information when an application for UC benefits is filed. This information includes timely returns by employers of requests for information as well as accurate quarterly reports.

Who administers unemployment compensation?

The Department of Labor & Industry is responsible for administering the UC Law. The Office of UC Tax Services through a statewide network of Field Accounting Service offices provides services to the employer community on UC matters, including coverage issues such as:
  • Taxability of Wages
  • Employee vs. Independent Contractor
  • Agricultural Employment
  • Domestic Employment
Office of UC Benefits provides services to claimants and employers on issues such as:
  • Claimant eligibility to receive UC benefits
  • Employer liability for worker benefits
  • Employer relief from charges

What is a UC account number?

An individual PA employer UC account number is assigned to each liable employer based on the information provided on the employer's registration form. This number facilitates the recording of contributions paid by and benefit payment charges assessed to each individual employer. It also acts as a mechanism to identify the employer in correspondence between the Office of UC Tax Services and the employer.

What are the UC responsibilities of PA employers?

Employers who pay wages for employment covered under the UC Law are required to:
  • register with the Department of Labor & Industry
  • maintain certain employment records;
  • file quarterly reports of wages paid and contributions due;
  • pay the employer contributions due on such quarterly reports; and
  • withhold and remit any employee contributions due on such quarterly reports for quarters during which employee contributions are in effect. (See Summary of Solvency Trigger Determination chart in Appendix E.)
  • Respond timely and adequately to the Department's request for information regarding an individual's eligibility for compensation.

Integrity and Fraud

The UC Fund is supported mostly through taxes paid by Pennsylvania employers. Therefore, any UC benefits fraudulently claimed is money stolen directly from those employers. Through fraud detection, PA attempts to prevent and detect benefits either paid through error by the Department, through willful misrepresentation, or error by claimants or others. The program also focuses on the recovery of these benefit overpayments.
 
How is unemployment insurance fraud detected? Possible or potential UC fraud is detected through various methods such as:
  • Daily and Weekly computer cross-matches of the State and National Directory of New Hire reports
  • Regular computer cross-match of wage record files with weekly benefits paid in UC
  • Processing and investigating anonymous tips and reports from various sources, such as employers, fellow employees, and other members of the public
Does the fraud detection program benefit employers? Yes. Better detection and prevention of improper UC benefit payments results in a decrease in benefit payouts which in turn decreases employer taxes.
 
Who investigates possible unemployment insurance fraud? PA has an internal audits division (IAD) with investigators throughout the commonwealth who receive information and determine if UC fraud has taken place due to misrepresentation.
 
How can employers help? To assist the investigation of potential UC fraud, employers should:
  • Comply with the investigators request for information
  • Provide information promptly including completion of wage cross-match forms
  • Make certain the information given is as accurate and complete as possible
  • Contribute any other information that can help in the investigation to determine if benefits have been fraudulently paid

How does an employer register for a UC tax account?

A single form (the Pennsylvania Enterprise Registration Form, or PA-100) is used to register for most of the taxes, licenses and services administrated by the Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry and the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue. The employment information supplied on Form PA-100 will provide the basis for determining whether employment is covered under the UC Law.
 
To obtain Form PA-100, contact the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue at:
Pennsylvania Department of Revenue
Bureau of Trust Fund Taxes
Dept 280901
Harrisburg, PA 17128-0901
Call 800-362-2050
You may also file form PA-100 electronically at www.PABizOnline.com
 
To change your address with the Department, you can log into your UCMS account and change your address or complete Form UC-2B, Employer's Report of Employment and Business Changes. This form should be mailed to: Department of Labor & Industry, Office of UC Tax Services, Registration and Document Management Section, 651 Boas Street, Room 908, Harrisburg, PA 17121.

What records must be kept by employers?

Employers subject to the UC Law must maintain the following records:
  • Employment and payroll records (for at least four years)
  • Supporting documentation for employees and independent contractors
  • Cash disbursement records
  • Journals
  • Ledgers
  • Written contracts
  • Federal and State tax returns
  • Corporate minutes
Additional records may be subject to review as circumstances warrant. These records must be maintained at the place of employment or at a central location, and must be available for inspection or audit by Office of UC Tax Services personnel.

When does an employer not receive a wage credit?

An employer's account shall be charged with compensation paid to an individual when an overpayment under Section 804 is established against the individual if the compensation paid is due to the employer or employer's agent failure to respond timely or adequately to the Department's request for information regarding and individual's eligibility for compensation.

What is an employee and what is an independent contractor?

"Employee" applies to every individual who is performing or has performed services for which the individual is receiving remuneration from an employer, unless specifically excluded from coverage under the law.
 
"Independent contractor" is a person who performs services meeting two conditions. The individual must be:
  • free from control or direction over the performance of the services involved; and
  • customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession or business.
If the individual is performing services in the construction industry, all of the following criteria must be met, before the individual may be considered an independent contractor;
  • they must possess the essential tools, equipment and other assets to perform the services;
  • they realize a profit or loss as a result of performing the services;
  • they perform services through a business in which they have a proprietary interest;
  • they maintain a business location separate from the location of the business for which the services are performed;
  • they must have a written contract;
  • they maintain liability insurance during the term of contract of at least $50,000
If the employer considers the worker to be an independent contractor, it is the employer's responsibility to maintain all records, documentation and evidence supporting that position.
 
The Office of UC Tax Services routinely audits employers to verify the status of employees and independent contractors. Employers should have sufficient documentation to substantiate classifying an individual as an "independent contractor."

When are workers entitled to benefits?

Workers (also known as claimants) may be entitled to benefits if they meet these eligibility requirements:
  • are able to work and available for suitable work;
  • earned enough wages to qualify and have sufficient credit weeks. Please note: A credit week is any calendar week in the base year for which the worker earned $100 or more;
  • performed services covered by the UC Law for an employer that is covered by the UC Law;
  • are unemployed through no fault of their own or due to a work stoppage that is the result of a lockout;
  • have filed an initial application for UC benefits;
  • are unemployed for a waiting period of one week after filing the initial application for benefits; and
  • file claims for weeks he/she is unemployed.
  • Effective with applications for benefits dated Jan. 1, 2012, and after with some exceptions, the claimant is required to register for employment search services offered by the Pennsylvania CareerLink®, apply for positions that offer employment and wages similar to those the individual had prior to becoming unemployed, and keep a weekly record of the efforts made to find work.

How do workers file for benefits?

In order to receive UC benefits, a worker is required to file an Application for Benefits. To file an application, workers may file online at www.uc.pa.gov or by calling the UC Service Center at 888-313-7284.
 
After an application is filed, a worker must file claims for weeks he or she is unemployed. In most cases, a claimant will be filing for two weeks at one time. This is called a biweekly claim. However, a claimant must certify eligibility for each week separately. A claimant cannot claim benefits for the first week until it is time to claim the second week. Thus, a claimant must file the claim only during the week immediately following the second week. If a claim is not filed in a timely manner, the claimant may not be eligible for benefits for the week or weeks that is being claimed.
 
Claimants may file their biweekly claims online at www.uc.pa.gov; or by telephone through Pennsylvania Teleclaims (PAT).

What is Form UC-1609P?

This form is designed for the employer's use to provide to their employees being separated so that that employee can have accurate employer information for their reference when filing an application for UC benefits. This can greatly assist in making certain that separating employers receive all of the necessary related mailings from the department after a claim is filed. In turn, having accurate information when the UC claim is filed and an informed employer can help reduce the number of inaccurate claims and, subsequently, incorrect charges to an employer's account. Employers can assist in the UC application process by always providing a copy of this form to their separating workers. This form can be found on our website at www.uc.pa.gov.

What is the Application for Benefits date?

The "Application for Benefits (AB) date" is the date of the Sunday that begins the week in which the application for benefits is filed. The AB date determines the base year and the benefit year.

What is the benefit year?

A "benefit year" is a 52 consecutive-week period beginning with the AB date. Claimants may file claims for their waiting week credit and for UC benefits for weeks of unemployment occurring within their benefit year.

What is the base year?

The "base year" is generally the first four of the last five completed calendar quarters prior to the AB date. The amount of money paid by all employers covered by the UC Law during the "base year" determines whether claimants qualify for benefits and for what amount.

What is the alternate base year?

Individuals who do not meet wage and credit week requirements as a result of being on workers' compensation during their base year may request a redetermination using an alternate base year. This alternate base year consists of the four completed calendar quarters immediately preceding the original date of the work-related injury. For the alternate base year rules to apply, the work-related injury must be compensable under the Pennsylvania Workers' Compensation Act. If claimants receive a Notice of Financial Determination indicating that they are ineligible for benefits and they want a calculation using the alternate base year rules, they must file a timely appeal from the financial determination and request a redetermination.

What is the 'Shared-Work' Program?

Effective upon publication in the Pennsylvania Bulletin, this program is an alternative method of unemployment insurance. Its goal is to reduce complete layoffs by paying partial unemployment benefits to employees who normally would not be eligible for regular UC. If an employer is facing temporary layoffs that would affect at least 10% of the employees in a designated work unit (which could be the employer's overall operation), the employer may seek approval for a shared-work plan. For more detailed information in regards to this program, please visit our website at www.uc.pa.gov.

When may workers be ineligible to collect benefits?

It is the responsibility of the claimant to be eligible and remain eligible for benefits. Workers may not be entitled to receive UC benefits or they may lose their eligibility to receive benefits if they fail to meet all the requirements of the UC Law and regulations. The following are some of the disqualifying provisions of the UC Law.
 
Voluntarily Quit Work — Workers may be ineligible for benefits if they voluntarily leave work without cause of a necessitous and compelling nature. The UC Law contains exceptions to this requirement. Among the exceptions are the following:
  • A claimant is permitted to exercise the option of accepting a temporary layoff from an available position under a labor-management contract agreement, or under an established employer plan, program or policy.
     
  • If a claimant is covered by a Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Program Certification, he/she may leave work to participate in training approved under the Trade Act of 1974, but only if that work is determined to be "not suitable," as defined by the Trade Act.
Fail to Submit to and/or Pass a Drug or Alcohol Test — Claimants may be ineligible for benefits if they fail to submit to and/or pass a drug or alcohol test conducted pursuant to the employer's established substance abuse policy, provided that the requested test is lawful and not in violation of an existing collective bargaining agreement.
 
Loss of Job Due to Willful Misconduct — Claimants may be ineligible for benefits if they lose their job because they willfully or negligently disregarded the employer's interests, violated rules, or disregarded appropriate standards of behavior.
 
Become Unemployed Due to Their Own Fault — Claimants may also be ineligible for benefits if they lose their job because of non-work-related misconduct that was contrary to acceptable standards of behavior and which directly affected their ability to do their assigned duties.
 
Strike — Claimants will be ineligible for benefits if they participate in a work stoppage that is determined by the department to be a strike.
 
Unable to Work or Unavailable for Work — Claimants may be ineligible for benefits if they are not able to work due to an illness or disability or due to not being available to work. However, claimants will not be ineligible if they are attending a training course approved by the Secretary of the Department of Labor & Industry and are otherwise eligible.
 
Active Search for Work — Failure to register for employment search services, and complete the active search for employment requirements, as instructed, pertaining to weekly claims on applications for benefits effective January 1, 2012, and thereafter.
 
Fail to Apply for or Accept Suitable Work — Claimants may be ineligible for benefits if they fail, without good cause, to accept an offer of suitable work or refuse a referral to a job opportunity. Offers of suitable work may be written or verbal. Employers must notify the department, in writing, within seven days of the offer of work regardless of how the offer was communicated, with the following information (1) rate of pay and period of time which such rate represents; (2) the scheduled working hours during each day of the week; (3) the location of work; (4) a description of the duties; and (5) any unusual requirements or conditions of work. However, they will not be ineligible if they are not required to accept the offer under the terms of a labor-management contract or agreement, or an established employer plan, program or policy. Also, claimants will not be ineligible for any week that they are in training approved by the Secretary of Labor & Industry, including training under the Trade Act of 1974.
 
In deciding whether a job is suitable under the UC Law, the Department of Labor & Industry considers the claimants' past training, experience, earnings, the rate of pay of the job offer, how long they have been unemployed, chances of finding a job in the same line of work, distance of the job from home, any risks to health and safety, whether full-time work was available instead of part-time or seasonal, and other factors.
 
Failure to Participate in Reemployment Services — Claimants may be ineligible for benefits if they fail to participate in reemployment services to which they have been referred through the claimant profiling system. The claimant profiling system has been designed to identify claimants who may benefit the most from reemployment services. If selected, the individual must participate in this mandatory program of reemployment services, unless:
  • the individual is already participating in or has already completed such services; or
  • there is a justifiable reason for the failure to participate in such services.
Withhold Facts or Give False Information — Claimants must file their claims timely and in the proper manner; that is, according to the instructions given by the UC Service Center. When filing claims, claimants must answer all questions completely and truthfully.
 
Claimants may be ineligible for benefits if they withhold facts or give false information to illegally receive or increase benefits. This includes, but is not limited to, the failure to report:
  • the gross earnings during the week for which benefits are being claimed even if paid later; or
  • hours absent when work was available.
  • A claimant who makes a false statement knowing it to be false or knowingly fails to disclose a material fact to obtain or increase benefit payments may be subject to a 15% surcharge of the amount of the benefits received.
Self Employment — Individuals may be ineligible for benefits if they are self-employed, setting up a business, or have ownership interest in a business. However, claimants may be entitled to benefits if they:
  • are engaged in a sideline business that existed prior to becoming unemployed from their regular employer;
  • report that they operate a business to the UC Service Center when filing the initial Application for Benefits;
  • do not substantially change their participation in the sideline business while unemployed; and
  • do not derive a primary source of livelihood from the sideline business.
Limit the Number of Hours Per Week — Claimants may be ineligible for benefits if they are working part-time and limit the number of hours they are working per week when there is additional work available.
 
Failure to Be Available as Instructed — Claimants may be ineligible for benefits if they fail to be available to be contacted by the UC Service Center when instructed to do so. It is the claimants' responsibility to inform the UC Service Center when they are unavailable for scheduled services. When they know that they will be unavailable to be contacted at the scheduled time, they will have to call the UC Service Center immediately.
 
Commit Fraud — If claimants are prosecuted and convicted of UC fraud, they may be ineligible to receive benefits for one year. If it is determined that they attempted to defraud the Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry, the employment security system of another state, or the Federal government, they may be ineligible for benefits for a penalty period related to the number of benefit payments.
 
Incarceration — Individuals are ineligible for benefits for weeks in which they are incarcerated following their conviction for a crime.

Do I have the right to appeal benefit determinations?

The claimant or employer may appeal a determination of eligibility issued by the Department of Labor & Industry. A contributing employer may appeal a relief from charges determination. The determination does not become final for 15 days after the mailing date of the determination. When the 15th day of the appeal period falls on a day on which the Department of Labor & Industry is closed (i.e., Saturday, Sunday, or holiday), the appeal period is extended to the next business day. If an appeal is filed after the 15-day appeal period has elapsed, the UC Referee will rule on the timeliness of the appeal.
 
Forms for filing an appeal may be obtained online, at a local Pennsylvania CareerLink, or an employer may send or fax a letter. If a letter is sent, the employer must state clearly that he/she wishes to appeal a determination. If an appeal is filed, an impartial UC Referee will conduct a hearing.
 
Should the employer disagree with the UC Referee's decision, the employer can file a further appeal with the UC Board of Review. The appeal must be filed within 15 days of the UC Referee's decision. Reconsideration of the UC Board of Review's decision may be requested within 15 days of that decision. In addition, the decision of the UC Board of Review may be appealed to Commonwealth Court. The appeal must be filed with the Prothonotary of the Commonwealth Court within 30 days of the mailing date of the Board's decision.
 
Failure to file an appeal within these time frames will result in the determination becoming final. It is extremely important that the employer act promptly if they wish to challenge an individual's receipt of benefits or a denial of a request for relief from charges. An appeal of the Department of Labor & Industry's determination on a claimant's eligibility is different from an employer's request for relief from charges and such appeals must be filed separately. An employer who does not appeal an eligible determination may not later dispute that determination in relief from charges proceedings or in a rate appeal.
 
An appeal to a claimant's eligibility determination must be filed directly to the UC Service Center handling the claim. An appeal to a denial of a request for relief from charges must be filed directly to the Employer Services Section.

UC TAX INFORMATION

The Pennsylvania Unemployment Compensation (UC) Law requires covered employers to make contributions into a pooled reserve known as the UC Fund. These contributions are used to pay benefits to jobless individuals who meet the claimant eligibility requirements of the UC Law.
 
In Pennsylvania, covered employers are required to report wages paid and remit contributions on a quarterly basis. The amount of contributions an employer owes is determined by multiplying the assigned contribution rate by the taxable wage base (see Appendix F) paid to each employee for each calendar year. In addition, the employer may also be required to withhold employee contributions from each employee's gross wages. The employee contribution rate is determined annually. Note: The annual contributory wage tax limit and employee contribution rate may be found by visiting our website at www.dli.state.pa.us, click "Employers", scroll and click "Unemployment Compensation", click "Tax Rate" and "Yearly Tax Highlights" or by contacting your nearest Field Accounting Service office or the Employer Contact Center.

DEFINITIONS

Employer — According to Section 4(j)(1) of the UC Law, an "employer" is defined as "the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, its political subdivisions, and their instrumentalities and every individual, copartnership, association, corporation (domestic or foreign), or other entity, the legal representative, trustee in bankruptcy, receiver or trustee of any individual, copartnership, association, corporation, or other entity, or the legal representative of a deceased person, who or which employed or employs any employee in employment subject to this act for some portion of a day during a calendar year, or who or which has elected to become fully subject to this act, and whose election remains in force."
 
Section 4(j)(3) specifies, "Where an employer maintains more than one place of employment within this Commonwealth, all of the employees at the several places of employment shall be treated, for the purposes of this act, as if employed by a single employer."
 
Employment — Employment is defined in Section 4(l) (1) of the UC Law as "all personal service performed for remuneration by an individual under any contract of hire, express or implied, written or oral, including service in interstate commerce, and service as an officer of a corporation."
 
Further classification regarding employment appears under Section 4(l)(2)(B) which states in part that "Services performed by an individual for wages shall be deemed to be employment subject to this act unless and until it is shown to the satisfaction of the department that —(a) such individual has been and will continue to be free from control or direction over the performance of such services both under his contract of service and in fact; and (b) as to such services such individual is customarlily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession or business."
 
Uniform Definition of Employment (Employment in Multiple States) — The various states have similar provisions regarding multi-state employment, in order to cover under one state law all the service performed for one employer by an individual, wherever it is performed.
 
It is necessary to determine whether the service is localized in any state. If the service is not localized, it then becomes necessary to determine in what state the individuals's base for operations is and whether the individual performs any service in that state. If the individual has no base for operations or if no service is performed in the state in which the base for operations is located, then it is necessary to look to the state from which the individual's service is directed and controlled. It is only when coverage is not determined by any of the tests above that residence becomes a factor.
 
In short, it may be necessary to apply four tests to determine the state of coverage:
  • localization of service;
  • base for operations;
  • place of direction or control; and
  • residence.
Additional information can be obtained by visiting our website www.uc.pa.gov, click "Employers Services", "PA Liability" and "Localized and Non-localized Employment". A downloadable UCP-7 pamphlet is also available on the department website www.dli.state.pa.us click "Publications" then "Employers".
 
Wages — Wages means all remuneration, (including the cash value of mediums of payment other than cash) paid by an employer to an individual with respect to his/her employment unless specifically excluded under Section 4(x) of the UC Law.
 
Agricultural Employment — An agricultural enterprise is liable for payment of contributions on wages paid to employees if the entity:
  • employs at least 10 full or part-time employees for any part of a day in 20 or more calendar weeks during the current or preceding calendar year; or
  • pays $20,000 in cash wages during any calendar quarter of the current or preceding calendar year.
Any questions regarding coverage of agricultural employment should be directed to the Employer Contact Center.
 
Domestic Employment — Individual homeowners, local college clubs, fraternities or sororities paying $1,000 or more in cash wages during any quarter of the current or preceding calendar year will be subject to the provisions of the UC Law.
 
Any questions regarding domestic employment should be directed to the Employer Contact Center.
 
Predecessor — An enterprise that transfers all or part of its organization, trade, business or workforce to another enterprise.
 
Successor — An enterprise that acquires by transfer all or part of the organization, trade, business or workforce from another enterprise.
 
Reserve Account Balance — An employer's reserve account is a record of contributions paid by an employer on taxable wages of employees and benefits paid to any former employees. Its sole use is in the computation of the contribution rate. The reserve account balance is the difference, positive or negative, between contributions paid by the employer and UC benefits paid to the employer's workers. A credit (positive) reserve balance does not represent an amount that would be refunded to an employer at any time.
 
An employer with a "negative" or "debit" reserve account balance (where the UC benefit charges assessed to his account exceed his contribution credits for amounts paid into the UC Fund) is not obligated to pay back such "excess" benefit costs.
 
If an employer terminates all or some of his business and then transfers it to a successor, his reserve account balance, whether positive or negative, may be transferred to that successor. This can be the result of either the successor's submitting a voluntary application for such a transfer or on a mandatory basis, in accordance with a bureau determination.
 
If an employer ceases to give employment, any reserve account balance that was not transferred to a successor remains on the employer's account until the account is deleted for four completed fiscal years. (For UC purposes, a fiscal year is July 1 to June 30 in any given year.)

REGISTRATION

PA EMPLOYER REGISTRATION

The commonwealth uses the Pennsylvania Enterprise Registration Form and Instructions (PA-100) to register an enterprise for certain services and taxes administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Labor & Industry and the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue. An enterprise is defined as any individual or organization, which is subject to the laws of the commonwealth of Pennsylvania. An enterprise may be a sole-proprietorship, partnership, corporation, association, etc. All enterprises that register with the commonwealth will be assigned an enterprise number.
 
Form PA-100 is available from the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue by calling 800-362-2050.

Information, online registration for a variety of services, and downloadable forms are also available at www.PABizOnline.com

REPORTING METHODS

Contributory Method — Liability is determined by multiplying taxable payroll by a contribution rate. Contributing employers pay on the first $8,500 of covered wages paid to each employee in calendar year 2013. (See Appendix F) Wages include not only salaries, commissions, bonuses and tips, but also the cash value of payment made in a medium other than cash, such as lodgings, meals, etc.
 
Reimbursable Method — Political subdivisions and Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 501(c)(3) nonprofit employers have a choice between the contributory and the reimbursable methods. For further information refer to UCP-16, UC Information for Reimbursable Eligible Employers.

TRANSFER OF EXPERIENCE

If a predecessor transfers its organization, trade or business to a successor who is continuing essentially the same business activity as the predecessor, the successor may apply for a transfer in whole or in part of the predecessor's UC experience record and reserve account balance, provided that:
  • the successor is continuing essentially the same business activity as the predecessor; and
  • the successor's risk of unemployment is related to the employment experience of the predecessor based upon the following factors:
    • Nature of the business activity of each enterprise;
    • Number of individuals employed by each enterprise; and
    • Wages paid to the employees by each enterprise.

Types of Transfer

Acquisition of an Existing Enterprise: Occurs when operations are continued by a new owner; for example, a purchase of all or part of the enterprise.
 
Change in Legal Structure: Occurs when the form of an organization changes; for example, when a sole proprietorship incorporates, or forms a partnership.
 
Consolidation: Occurs when a new corporation is formed by combining two or more corporations which then cease to exist.
 
Gift: Occurs when the title to the property is transferred without consideration.
 
Merger: Occurs when one corporation is absorbed by another. One corporation preserves its original charter or identity and continues to exist and the other corporate existence terminates.
 
IRC Section 338 Election: Occurs when a stock purchase is treated as an asset purchase under the Internal Revenue Code Section 338.

Applying for a Predecessor's Experience Record

To determine if it is advantageous to apply for a predecessor's UC experience record and reserve account balance, the enterprise should consider the following:
  • Comparison of the predecessor's rate for the year the transfer occurred to the applicable newly liable rate; and
  • Any adverse effect that the transfer of the predecessor's experience record and reserve account balance, and any potential benefit charges attributable to the predecessor, would have on future years' rate calculations.
An application for a transfer of experience record will be denied if the department finds that the business transfer was done primarily to obtain a lower UC tax rate.

When a Transfer Is Mandatory

The Department of Labor & Industry may determine that a transfer of experience from a predecessor to the successor will be mandatory if one of the following two conditions exists:
  • There is common ownership, control, and/or management, either directly or indirectly, between the predecessor and the successor by legally enforceable means or otherwise; or
  • An outside source controls both the predecessor and successor, either directly or indirectly, by legally enforceable means or otherwise.
Civil penalties will be imposed if the department finds that an employer willfully failed to report a transfer of experience from a predecessor to a successor account.

COVERAGE UNDER THE PA UC LAW

All employers providing full and/or part-time employment to one or more workers must be registered with the Office of UC Tax Services. Form PA-100 should be completed and returned to the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Revenue, Bureau of Business Trust Fund Taxes, Dept. 280901, Harrisburg, PA 17128-0901. The PA-100 form may be filed electronically at www.PABizOnline.com. The employment information furnished by the enterprise on Form PA-100 will provide the basis for determining whether such employment is covered under the UC Law.
 
If employment is covered under the UC Law, the employer is liable for payment of contributions on wages paid to employees. If an employer is determined to be liable under the UC Law, an employer UC account number is assigned in addition to the enterprise number. The UC account number facilitates the recording of contributions paid by and benefit payment charges assessed to each individual employer. It also acts as a mechanism to identify the employer in correspondence between the Office of UC Tax Services and the employer.

Who Is Not Covered

Certain types of employment are specifically excluded from coverage under the UC Law. Some examples of excluded employment are for services performed by:
  • an individual in the employment of a son, daughter or spouse; or
  • a child under the age of 18 in the employ of a parent
  • A student in the employ of an organized camp where the camp does not operate more than seven months in the preceding calendar year.
Any questions regarding excluded employment should be directed to the Employer Contact Center.

Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA) Coverage

Section 4(x)(6) and Section 4(l)(6) of the UC Law have been termed the "catch-all clauses." These provisions state that regardless of the exclusions in the UC Law, services and remuneration for services performed which are covered by the Federal Unemployment Tax Act will also be considered subject to coverage under the UC Law.

Who May Voluntarily Elect Coverage

Any employer not covered by the UC Law has the option of voluntarily requesting coverage, although the Office of UC Tax Services must approve the request before coverage is extended. Upon approval, the elected coverage is binding on the employer for not less than two years. To request coverage, an employer must file an application with the Office of UC Tax Services. Forms for requesting coverage can be obtained by visiting the department website at www.dli.state.pa.us, click "Downloadable Forms", "Unemployment Compensation" and "Coverage/Multistate Employment" or by contacting the Status Determination unit.

WHAT RECORDS MUST BE KEPT

All employers, whether or not liable for the payment of contributions, must maintain the following records so that they can be made available for review by the department, when necessary:
  • Employment and payroll records
  • Supporting documentation for employees and independent contractors
  • Cash disbursement records
  • Journals
  • Ledgers
  • Corporate minutes
These records must be retained for at least four years after contributions relating to such records have been paid (except daily attendance records, which need not be retained for more than two years). These records must be maintained at the place of employment or at a central location and must be available for inspection or audit by Office of UC Tax Services personnel.

REPORTS AND CONTRIBUTIONS

WHEN REPORTS MUST BE FILED

Employers covered by the UC Law are required to file reports and remit contributions on a quarterly basis. The reports and payment are due at the end of the month following the calendar quarter.
 
QUARTER
COVERING
DUE ON
OR BEFORE 
Jan, Feb, March  
April 30 
April, May, June 
July 31 
July, Aug, Sep 
October 31 
Oct, Nov, Dec  
January 31 
 
If a due date falls on a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, the report will become due on the next business day. Employers are required to report wages for the quarter in which the wages are paid. Conversely, credit weeks are reported for the quarter in which they are earned. Please note: Effective with the 4th quarter of 2011, a credit week is any calendar week in which the employee earned $100 or more in covered employment, regardless of when that week was paid.

FILING REPORTS BY INTERNET

Beginning with the first quarterly reporting period, due April 30, 2014, electronic reporting is required for all filers to submit UC wage and tax data to Pennsylvania via online reporting or file upload (through the employer portal at www.paucemployers.state.pa.us), or File Transfer Protocol (FTP). The electronic reporting requirement is for both current and past due reports. Physical media such as tapes, diskettes, cds, etc. will no longer be accepted.
 
For information on the available electronic filing methods go to www.dli.state.pa.us, select Employers from the left navigation, scroll down to select the Unemployment Compensation link, then select UC Management System from the left navigation.

HOW TO MAKE WAGE CORRECTIONS TO A PA UC ACCOUNT

The Pennsylvania Unemployment Compensation Correction Report (Form UC-2X) is prepared by an employer and/or their representative to make corrections to their account for previously reported wages and/or payments.
 
The Corrected Pennsylvania Gross Wages Paid to Employees report (Form UC-2AX) is prepared by an employer and/or their representative to make corrections to previously reported employee gross wages.
 
A separate UC-2X and UC-2AX is required for each quarter.
 
Employers may also make corrections electronically, through their UCMS portal at www.paucemployers.state.pa.us.

THE PENALTY FOR FILING LATE REPORTS OR FILING REPORTS IN PAPER FORM

A penalty will be assessed against any employer who fails to submit a quarterly contribution report when it is due or files any report in paper form. The penalty is 10 percent of the total contribution due for a quarter, not less than $25 or more than $250 per quarter or infraction.

THE INTEREST RATE FOR LATE PAYMENT

Delinquent contributions are subject to an interest charge as provided under Section 308 of the UC Law (43 P.S.§788) per month, or fraction of a month, from the date that they become due until paid. This includes any portion of the month in which payment is made. The rate of interest is determined annually under Section 806 of the fiscal code (72 P.S. §806), unless it is less than the 9% minimum established by Act 5 of 2005.

THE PENALTY FOR DISHONORED CHECKS

Any check or electronic payment dishonored by a bank will be subject to a penalty of 10% of the face value of the check or electronic payment, with a minimum charge of $25 and a maximum charge of $1,000 per occurrence.

THE PENALTY FOR NOT SUBMITTING REQUESTED REGISTRATION REPORTS

A 3% "Increase for UC Delinquency" will be added to the tax rate that would normally be assigned to any employer who fails to submit any part of a registration report when it is requested. Willful failure to provide this information could result in civil fines and criminal prosecution under section 802 of the PA UC Law.

THE EMPLOYEE’S CONTRIBUTION

Regardless of whether an employer pays contributions or elects to reimburse the UC Fund for benefit payments, all employers are required to withhold employee contributions, for applicable years, at the time wages are paid. Whether or not employee contributions are payable, the employee contribution rate is determined annually according to a formula contained in the trigger mechanism of the UC Law.
 
These monies are a trust fund obligation and must be remitted to the Department of Labor & Industry with quarterly contribution reports. Failure to withhold employee contributions and to promptly remit such contributions withheld in trust to the UC Fund can result in criminal prosecution of the employer and/or personal liability, including the filing of liens against the employer and officers and agents of the employer.
 
Employee contributions are based on an individuals's total (gross) wages. The employer's annual contributory wage tax limit ceiling does not apply to employee contributions. Employee contributions are not credited to an employer's reserve account, nor are they considered being" contributions" for the Federal certification purposes under the Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA).

THE EMPLOYER’S CONTRIBUTION

The amount of employer contribution due is based on a specified percentage of taxable wages. Pennsylvania employers pay unemployment contributions on the annual contributory wage tax limit for wages paid to each employee in a calendar year. Wages include not only salary, commissions, bonuses and tips, but also sick or accident disability payments (except workers' compensation payments) made by an employer or third party (insurance company) and certain fringe benefits. The cash value of payment made in a medium other than cash, such as lodgings, meals, etc., is also considered wages.
 
Nonprofit organizations exempt under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code (but not exempt under the UC Law) that elect to reimburse the UC Fund for benefits paid to former employees are billed monthly by invoice for the benefits allocated to their account. Political subdivisions are billed quarterly.

RATES

HOW EMPLOYERS ARE NOTIFIED OF THEIR RATE EACH YEAR

Each year, all factors are examined and analyzed to determine each individual employer's contribution rate. A Contribution Rate Notice (Form UC-657) showing the rate effective for the following year is sent to each employer by Dec. 31. This percentage is to be applied to taxable wages paid (for each employee's annual contributory wage tax limit) to determine the amount of employer contributions due.
 
This rate notice serves to notify employers of their contribution rate and explains each of the factors comprising the total rate. An employer may appeal a contribution rate (except for the State Adjustment Factor, Interest Factor, Surcharge Adjustment and Additional Contributions component).

RATES ASSIGNED TO NEW EMPLOYERS

Unless subject to a delinquent contribution rate, newly liable employers are assigned a new employer contribution rate. The rate new employers are assigned is effective for approximately two years. After two years, the employer may have sufficient experience to be entitled to a calculated rate.

WHEN STANDARD RATES ARE ASSIGNED

Contributory employers who have a sporadic employment history may be assigned a standard contribution rate. Examples:
  • A standard rate would be assigned to an employer who files "none" reports (no covered wages) during each quarter of one of the last four 12-month periods ending June 30 of the preceding year, because the employer would not have sufficient employment experience upon which to base a calculated rate.
     
  • A standard rate would be assigned to an employer whose account is deleted and less than five years later the employer provided employment again. The employer would be assigned a standard rate based on the balance in the reserve account at the time the account was deleted.
One standard rate is assigned to employers with zero or positive reserve account balances, while a higher standard rate is assigned to employers with negative reserve account balances. The additional contributions component and interest factor are added to the standard rates in accordance with the UC Law.

EXPERIENCE RATES

After an employer has provided covered employment and paid wages for approximately two years, the employer may then be eligible for an experience based calculated rate. An experience rating system allows for variations in the contribution rates assigned to individual employers through the assessment of each employer's unemployment risk. The Office of UC Tax Services reviews an employer's history of unemployment and calculates a rate each calendar year based on the employment experience through June 30 of the preceding year. Employers with high rates of unemployment can expect higher contribution rates, while employers showing a stable employment history can expect to receive reduced rates.
 
An employer's experience based contribution rate has six components:
  • Reserve Ratio Factor
  • Benefit Ratio Factor
  • State Adjustment Factor
  • Surcharge Adjustment
  • Additional Contribution
  • Interest Factor
The Contribution Rate Notice (Form UC-657) is mailed to employers prior to the first of each calendar year and shows the rate effective for the upcoming year.

Reserve Ratio Factor

An employer's reserve ratio is a lifetime measure of the employer's risk with unemployment. The ratio is determined by dividing the balance in the employer's reserve account (i.e., the lifetime UC contributions paid by the employer, including voluntary contributions, minus the lifetime benefits charged against the employer's account) by the employer's average taxable payroll for the three 12-month periods ending on the computation date. (The computation date is June 30 preceding the year for which the rate is being calculated.) This ratio (percentage) is then cross-referenced to the applicable table in the UC Law, which indicates the employer's Reserve Ratio Factor (see Reserve Ratio Factor Table in Appendix D). The Reserve Ratio Factor is part of the experience rate for covered employers. This factor ranges from 0% to 2.7%. The employer's Reserve Ratio Factor is identified on the Contribution Rate Notice (Form UC-657). In determining experience rates, the UC Law places employers into particular groups. These groups are based on the length of time that an employer paid contributions.
 
Group 1: An employer who paid contributions for at least one quarter during each of the two 12-month periods ending on the computation date (June 30) qualifies as a Group 1 employer. A Group 1 employer's Reserve Ratio Factor is equal to one-third of the Group 3 rate (see Appendix D).
 
Group 2: If an employer paid contributions for at least one quarter in each of the three 12-month periods ending on the computation date (June 30), the employer will be assigned to Group 2. An employer assigned to Group 2 has a Reserve Ratio Factor equal to two-thirds of the Group 3 rate (see Appendix D).
 
Group 3: An employer who paid contributions for one or more quarters in each of the four 12-month periods ending on the computation date (June 30) is classified as a Group 3 employer. (A Group 3 employer's Reserve Ratio Factor is shown in Appendix D).
 
Note: An employer who has sufficient employer experience to be classified in Group 3 cannot be classified in either Group 1 or Group 2, nor can an employer who has sufficient employer experience to be classified in Group 2 be classified in Group 1.

Benefit Ratio Factor

The Benefit Ratio Factor is a short-term comparison of the employer's taxable payroll and UC benefit charges. This factor is determined by dividing the employer's average benefit costs for the two or three 12-month periods ending on the computation date by the employer's average payroll for the same two or three periods. The divisor is determined based upon the employer's Group Number. The Benefit Ratio Factor ranges from 0% to 5%.
 
Note: Compute to a tenth of a percentage, with fractional parts rounded to the nearest tenth. If the computed factor is greater than 5% (.05), then decrease the factor to 5%.

State Adjustment Factor

The State Adjustment Factor finances benefit costs that are paid out of the UC Fund, but which are not charged to any specific employer account. This factor ranges from 0% to 1.5%. The State Adjustment Factor is the same for all experience rated contributory employers and is not subject to appeal. The State Adjustment Factor is identified on the Contribution Rate Notice (Form UC-657).

Surcharge Adjustment*

This component of the experience rate is the same for all employers and is not subject to appeal. The surcharge is factored into the contribution rate on contributions payable by multiplying the basic rate on the Contribution Rate Notice (Form UC-657) by the surcharge. The result of the computation is the Surcharge Adjustment.

Additional Contributions*

The Additional Contributions rate is the same for all (except those subject to newly liable contribution rates) contributory employers. The Additional Contributions rate component is identified on the Contribution Rate Notice (Form UC-657).
 
* Refer to the following section “Solvency Trigger”and Appendix E for further explanation.

Interest Factor

If the UC Fund balance is depleted, the commonwealth can borrow money from the federal government to enable it to continue to pay benefits to unemployed workers. The monies borrowed are subject to an annual interest charge. Federal law prohibits the use of state UC Fund monies to pay the annual interest charge; therefore, a separate contribution (Interest Factor) was created to generate the necessary revenues to satisfy interest payments on outstanding loans.
 
The Interest Factor is the same for all (except those employers subject to newly liable contribution rates) contributory employers and is not subject to appeal. The Interest Factor is not applicable for all years. Payments attributable to this Interest Factor, like employee contributions, are not credited to an employer's reserve account. Such amounts are not credited to the experience record or used for future rate computation purposes. In addition, the Interest Factor is not considered to be a "contribution" for federal certification purposes under the provisions of the Federal Unemployment Tax Act (FUTA).

SOLVENCY TRIGGER

As part of the 1988 Amendments, various solvency provisions were added to the UC Law. These provisions increase contribution revenues, decrease benefit payments, or both, to ensure that sufficient monies are available to meet benefit costs.
 
These solvency measures trigger on and off, depending on the "trigger percentage." This percentage is determined by dividing the UC Fund balance as of the computation date (June 30) by the average benefit costs for the three 12-month periods ending on that date.
 
On July 1 of every year, the Department of Labor & Industry will calculate the trigger percentage. This percentage will determine the adjustment to be made to contribution rates and benefits applicable for the following calendar year.
 
The trigger determination is a solvency measure that does not affect the employer's contribution rate. The two solvency measures that affect an employer's contribution rate are the surcharge adjustment and additional contributions.

DELINQUENT EMPLOYERS

Employers who, as of the computation date, fail to file required registration reports, quarterly tax reports or pay contributions, interest or penalties due through the second quarter of the prior year will have a 3% increase for UC delinquency included in their rate calculation. The increase for UC delinquency is added in before the surcharge adjustment calculation.

HOW TO APPEAL TAX RATES

Each employer is mailed an annual Contribution Rate Notice (Form UC-657) by the Office of UC Tax Services. This rate notice provides an employer with the UC tax rate for the calendar year. The rate notice includes information on how the rate was determined. If an employer disagrees with their rate notice, they must first appeal that notice to the Office of UC Tax Services by filing a rate appeal within 90 days from the date of the rate notice.
 
The Office of UC Tax Services will review the appeal and send the employer a letter either granting or denying the appeal. If the employer disagrees with the bureau's decision, they have 30 days to appeal to the Tax Review Office. The appeal letter must contain specific factual statements showing the nature of the appeal and the basis for disagreement. The employer's appeal letter should also include the business name, address, UC tax account number and the signature of an employer's authorized representative.
 
If a hearing is scheduled, the UC Tax Review Office will send a "Notice of Hearing" to the employer and the Office of UC Tax Services approximately six weeks before the hearing date. The purpose of the hearing, where testimony is taken under oath, is to gather all facts related to the appeal. This hearing is very important because this will be the only opportunity for the employer to present evidence for the record.
 
At the hearing, an employer has the right to:
  • be represented at their own expense by an attorney, accountant or other advisor;
  • present testimony and other relevant evidence; and
  • question opposing parties and witnesses.
Witnesses should have firsthand knowledge about the facts that will be the subject of their testimony.

DEBIT RESERVE ACCOUNT BALANCE ADJUSTMENT

An employer with a debit reserve account balance may submit a letter requesting that the reserve account balance be adjusted to a negative balance equal to 20 percent of the average annual taxable payroll. If an employer elects to do this and the election is approved by the Office of UC Tax Services, the maximum experience rate will be assigned for the current and the following two calendar years. The employer letter must be submitted between Jan. 1 and April 30 and shall not be revocable for any cause after 10 days from the date of the letter. The reserve account balance will be adjusted as of June 30 of the preceding year. A letter requesting a debit reserve account balance adjustment should be mailed to the Department of Labor & Industry, Office of UC Tax Services, Employer Account Services, Labor & Industry Building, 651 Boas Street, Harrisburg, PA 17121-0750.

VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS

For an experience rated employer, a Voluntary Contribution can be made to the UC Fund in order to improve their reserve balances, and thereby reduce the Reserve Ratio Factor of an employer's Tax Rate. The Voluntary Contribution is applied directly to an employer's Reserve Account Balance and cannot be applied towards contributions due. A relatively small Voluntary Contribution to an employer's UC account may cause their overall UC tax bill to go down significantly.
 
A Voluntary Contribution must be made within 30 days from the date of the Contribution Rate Notice (Form UC-657), but in no case later than 120 calendar days from the beginning of the calendar year, whichever is sooner. The Voluntary Contribution shall not be revocable for any cause, and is not subject to refund. A letter and accompanying Voluntary Contribution should be mailed to the Department of Labor & Industry, Office of UC Tax Services, Employer Account Services, Labor & Industry Building, 651 Boas Street, Harrisburg, PA 17121-0750.
 
Periodically, an employer may be contacted by the Department of Labor & Industry to schedule an audit. The purpose of the audit is to verify the accuracy of reports filed by the employer and to ensure the proper classification of employees. The auditor will coordinate a visit to the employer's place of business or to the location of the employer's records. If the auditor discovers additional tax liability and the employer disagrees with the auditor's findings, the employer has the right to appeal the determination through the assessment process.

EMPLOYER AUDITS

An assessment is a determination by the Office of UC Tax Services, that an entity is liable for UC taxes, interest and penalties due for employment and wages covered under the UC Law. When an employer and the bureau are unable to agree on a UC tax liability issue, the bureau will issue a "Notice of Assessment" along with a "Petition for Reassessment" form. The assessment contained in this notice is final, unless within 15 days of receipt of the notice the employer completes and files a "Petition for Reassessment" form with the UC Tax Review Office. This petition is the method of appealing an assessment. The employer's petition must contain specific and detailed factual statements showing the reasons the employer feels the assessment is erroneous and must be signed by the employer or their authorized representative. Approximately two weeks after the UC Tax Review Office receives a "Petition for Reassessment", the employer should receive an acknowledgement letter. When a hearing is scheduled, the Presiding Officer will send a "Notice of Hearing" to the employer and the Office of UC Tax Services approximately six weeks before the hearing date. The purpose of the hearing, where testimony is taken under oath, is to gather all facts related to the appeal. This hearing is very important because this will be the only opportunity for both sides to present evidence for the record.
 
At the hearing an employer has the right to:
  • be represented at their own expense by an attorney, accountant or other advisor;
  • present testimony and other relevant evidence; and
  • question opposing parties and witnesses.
Witnesses should have firsthand knowledge about the facts that will be the subject of their testimony.
  • time limits for filing a request for relief from charges, should be directed to:
    Employer Services Section
    P.O. Box 67504
    Harrisburg, PA 17106-7504

ASSISTANCE AND INFORMATION

Information regarding the contribution or coverage provisions of the Pennsylvania Unemployment Compensation Law can be provided by the nearest Field Accounting Service office listed in Appendix C, or writing to:
Office of UC Tax Services (OUCTS)
Labor & Industry Building
651 Boas Street
Harrisburg, PA 17121-0750
Employers can also call the Employer Contact Center at 717-787-7979 or 866-403-6163
Inquiries regarding benefit claims or benefit appeals should be directed to a UC Service Center at 866-233-4718 or, for established claims, the office handling the claim.

RELIEF FROM CHARGES

Employers requesting information for a specific employee(s) regarding:
  • under what circumstances relief from charges may be granted;
  • determinations, decisions and/or appeals relating to relief from charges,
  • benefit charges/credits to their reserve account contained on Form UC-640, Monthly Notice of Compensation Charged;
  • protests to benefit charges filed with the Bureau via Form UC-44FR, Request for Relief from Charges. If you do not have a UC-44FR Request for Relief from Charges, you may request "Relief from Charges" using your company letterhead. Please make sure that you include the following information:
     
    • Claimant's name and social security number
    • Employer name and account number
    • Last day of work
    • Reason for separation from employment
    • Authorized signature
     
    Please note: LACK OF WORK separations DO NOT QUALIFY for relief. Your company may request "Relief from Charges" for separations other than "LACK OF WORK".
     
    For more information on Relief From Charges, please visit our website at www.dli.state.pa.us or call 717-787-4677.
  • credits to their reserve account due to 1) a subsequent approval or relief from charges or 2) a claimant's ineligibility for UC and subsequent overpayment;
  • how to request relief from charges; and

CAREERLINK

Employers interested in Pennsylvania CareerLink programs and services should contact the nearest Pennsylvania CareerLink listed in a local telephone directory, or visit the Pennsylvania CareerLink website at www.pacareerlink.state.pa.us.

UC FRAUD

To report unemployment compensation fraud, call the toll-free Pennsylvania UC Fraud Hotline, 800-692-7496.

DISCRIMINATION PROHIBITED

Equal Opportunity is the Law: It is against the law for this recipient of federal financial assistance to discriminate on the following bases:
  • Against any individual in the United States, on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief; and
  • Against any beneficiary of programs financially assisted under Title I of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), on the basis of the beneficiary's citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States, or his or her participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity.
The recipient must not discriminate in any of the following areas:
  • Deciding who will be admitted, or have access, to any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity;
  • Providing opportunities in, or treating any person with regard to, such a program or activity; or
  • Making employment decisions in the administration of, or in connection with, such a program or activity.
 
What to Do If You Believe You Have Experienced Discrimination: If you think that you have been subjected to discrimination under a WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity, you may file a complaint within 180 days from the date of the alleged violation with either:
  • The recipient's Equal Opportunity Officer (or the person whom the recipient has designated for this purpose); or
  • The Director, Civil Rights Center (CRC), U.S. Department of Labor, 200 Constitution Avenue NW, Room N-4123, Washington, DC 20210
If you file your complaint with the recipient, you must wait either until the recipient issues a written Notice of Final Action, or until 90 days have passed (whichever is sooner), before filing with the Civil Rights Center (see address above).
 
If the recipient does not give you a written Notice of Final Action within 90 days of the day on which you filed your complaint, you do not have to wait for the recipient to issue that Notice before filing a complaint with CRC. However, you must file your CRC complaint within 30 days of the 90-day deadline (in other words, within 120 days after the day on which you filed your complaint with the recipient).
 
If the recipient does give you a written Notice of Final Action on your complaint, but you are dissatisfied with the decision or resolution, you may file a complaint with CRC. You must file your CRC complaint within 30 days of the date on which you received the Notice of Final Action.
 
For information or to file a complaint, contact:
Director's Office
Department of Labor & Industry
Office of Equal Opportunity
Room 514 Labor & Industry Building
651 Boas Street
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17121-0750
Telephone: 717-787-1182 or 800-622-5422
TDD/TTY: 800-654-5984
Fax: 717-772-2321

APPENDIX A

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION SERVICE CENTERS
 
UC Service Centers listed below have been established to serve all Pennsylvanians. Claimant services are provided through the Internet at www.uc.pa.gov or by UC Service Centers through a toll-free number at 888-313-7284. TTY service is provided for the deaf and hard of hearing at 888-334-4046.
 
Information on UC separation and eligibility issues is provided through a special employer services telephone number at 866-223-4718
 
OFFICE
ADDRESS
FAX
NUMBER 
Allentown UC Service Center  160 W. Hamilton Street 
Suite 500
Allentown, PA 18101-1994
610-821-6281
Altoona UC Service Center   1101 Green Avenue 
Altoona, PA 16601-3483 
814-941-6801
Duquesne UC Service Center 14 N. Linden Street 
Duquesne, PA 15110-1067
412-267-1475
Erie UC Service Center   1316 State Street 
Erie, PA 16501-1978 
814-871-4863
Indiana UC Service Center 630 Kolter Drive 
Indiana, PA 15701-3570
724-599-1068
Lancaster UC Service Center 36 E. Grant Street 
Lancaster, PA 17602
717-299-7557
Scranton UC Service Center  30 Stauffer Industrial Park 
Taylor, PA 18517-9625 
570-562-4385

PENNSYLVANIA TELECLAIMS (PAT) TELEPHONE NUMBERS

Please use the number listed below for a local call in your area. If all numbers listed are long distance from your area, use the toll-free number: 888-255-4728 (or TTY 888-411-4728*).
 
Dialing Area PAT Number   Dialing Area PAT Number
 
Allentown 610-821-6659   Harrisburg-Spanish 717-231-4056
Altoona 814-941-6849   Indiana 724-599-1004
Duquesne 412-267-1494   Lancaster 717-299-7560
Erie 814-878-5700   Scranton 570-562-4800
Harrisburg 717-231-4055   TTY Scranton 570-562-4870*
 
*Persons using a text telephone (TTY) may access PAT by dialing this number. This service can only be accessed if the call is made from a TTY device. If you do not have a TTY device, do not call PAT using any of the TTY numbers provided; instead, call PAT using your local number or the toll-free number (if you do not have a local PAT number).

APPENDIX B

OFFICE OF UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION BENEFITS
 
OFFICE
ADDRESS
PHONE
NUMBER
Employer Information Center Room 525 L & I Building 
651 Boas Street
Harrisburg, PA 17121-0750 
717-783-3140
717-787-4677
Employers Services Section P.O. Box 67504
Harrisburg, PA 17106-7504
 
Claimant Services Section Room 510 L & I Building 
651 Boas Street
Harrisburg, PA 17121-0750
 

APPENDIX C

ADDITIONAL CONTACTS
 
OFFICE
ADDRESS
PHONE
NUMBER
Status Determination Unit Room 824, L & I Building
651 Boas Street
Harrisburg, PA 17121-0750
717-772-4903
PA Relay Center (Hearing Impaired)  
800-654-5988
Then state the
TTY number you
wish to call
Commonwealth of PA website - PA PowerPort www.pa.gov
Pennsylvania Open for Business   www.PABizOnline.com
Department of Labor & Industry Website www.dli.state.pa.us
CareerLink Website www.pacareerlink.state.pa.us

APPENDIX D

RESERVE RATIO FACTOR TABLE
 
 
RESERVE RATIO FACTOR
EMPLOYER’S RESERVE ACCOUNT AS A
PERCENTAGE OF TAXABLE WAGES
GROUP 1
(1/3 OF GROUP 3 RATE)*
GROUP 2
(2/3 OF GROUP 3
 RATE)*
GROUP 3
Greater than 25% 
0.0% (.000)
0.0% (.000)
0.0% (.000)
Greater than or equal to 21% but less than 25%
0.1% (.001)
0.2% (.002)
0.3% (.003)
Greater than or equal to 18% but less than 21%
0.2% (.002)
0.3% (.003)
0.4% (.004)
Greater than or equal to 15% but less than 18%
0.2% (.002)
0.4% (.004)
0.5% (.005)
Greater than or equal to 12% but less than 15%
0.2% (.002)
0.4% (.004)
0.6% (.006)
Greater than or equal to 9% but less than 12%
0.3% (.003)
0.5% (.005)
0.7% (.007)
Greater than or equal to 7% but less than 9%
0.3% (.003)
0.6% (.006)
0.8% (.008)
Greater than or equal to 5% but less than 7%
0.3% (.003)
0.6% (.006)
0.9% (.009)
Greater than or equal to 3% but less than 5%
0.4% (.004)
0.7% (.007)
1.0% (.010)
Greater than or equal to 1% but less than 3%
0.4% (.004)
0.8% (.008)
1.1% (.011)
Greater than or equal to 0% but less than 1%
0.4% (.004)
0.8% (.008)
1.2% (.012)
Less than 0% but greater than – 1% 
0.5% (.005)
0.9% (.009)
1.3% (.013)
Less than or equal to – 1% but greater than – 2%
0.5% (.005)
1.0% (.010)
1.4% (.014)
Less than or equal to – 2% but greater than – 3%
0.5% (.005)
1.0% (.010)
1.5% (.015)
Less than or equal to – 3% but greater than – 4%
0.6% (.006)
1.1% (.011)
1.6% (.016)
Less than or equal to – 4% but greater than – 5%
0.6% (.006)
1.2% (.012)
1.7% (.017)
Less than or equal to – 5% but greater than – 6%
0.6% (.006)
1.2% (.012)
1.8% (.018)
Less than or equal to – 6% but greater than – 7%
0.7% (.007)
1.3% (.013)
1.9% (.019)
Less than or equal to – 7% but greater than – 8%
0.7% (.007)
1.4% (.014)
2.0% (.020)
Less than or equal to – 8% but greater than – 9%
0.7% (.007)
1.4% (.014)
2.1% (.021)
Less than or equal to – 9% but greater than – 10%
0.8% (.008)
1.5% (.015)
2.2% (.022)
Less than or equal to – 10% but greater than – 11%
0.8% (.008)
1.6% (.016)
2.3% (.023)
Less than or equal to – 11% but greater than – 12%
0.8% (.008)
1.6% (.016)
2.4% (.024)
Less than or equal to – 12% but greater than – 16%
0.9% (.009)
1.7% (.017)
2.5% (.025)
Less than or equal to – 16% but greater than – 20%
0.9% (.009)
1.8% (.018)
2.6% (.026)
Less than or equal to – 20% or lower 
0.9% (.009)
1.8% (.018)
2.7% (.027)
 
*If the reduced reserve ratio for group 1 and 2 employers was not a multiple of one-tenth of one per centum (0.1%), it has been rounded to the next higher multiple of one-tenth of one per centum (0.1%), as required by UC Law.

APPENDIX E

Beginning in 2013, solvency measures will be assessed if the solvency percentage on June 30 of the preceeding year is less than 250%. The following table shows projected solvency measure rates for 2013 through 2017.

SOLVENCY MEASURES 2013-20171

 
TRIGGER LEVEL
EMPLOYER ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTIONS2
EMPLOYER SURCHARGE3
EMPLOYMENT TAX4
BENEFIT REDUCITON
250% or more
None
None
None
None
Less than 250%
0.65%
5.1%
0.07%
1.7%
 
1 Solvency measures for 2013-2017 are based on contribution and benefit activity for calendar year 2011.
 
2 Assessed on employer contributions due and excludes reimbursable employers. The surcharge is not assessed on solvency additional contributions.
 
3 Added on to an employer's assigned rate and excludes new and reimbursable employers. The measure is not subject to the solvency surcharge on contributions due.
 
4 Assessed on all employee gross wages for a calendar year.

APPENDIX F

TAXABLE WAGE BASE INCREASES
 
YEARS
TAXABLE WAGE BASE
Prior to 1/1/2013 $8,000
1/1/2013 $8,500
1/1/2014 $8,750
1/1/2015 $9,000
1/1/2016 $9,500
1/1/2017 $9,750
1/1/2018 $10,000
 
 
 
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UCP-36 REV 1-14
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